AP ignoring its own style guide in coverage of Ferguson shooting

The Associated Press Stylebook informs the stylistic practices of a large majority of news outlets in the United States. But it now appears as though the AP is violating its own rules in the coverage of the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri on August 9.

As TheBlaze reports, the stylebook states news reports should “use man or woman for individuals 18 and older.” Brown was 18-years-old at the time of his death, and yet the AP has routinely referred to him as a “teen” or “teenager” in its photo captions, headlines, and articles.

“So they're ignoring their own stylebook so that they can, you know, make it sound like he's younger and he's not, I don't know, accountable, he's not responsible, to add more empathy,” Pat said on radio this morning.

On Monday’s Mediaite’s Eddie Scarry published an article highlighting the AP’s inconsistencies. He cited two specific examples

Why, then, are AP reports on the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown solely referring to him as a “teen” and “teenager”?

“Don’t know’ if Missouri teen shot with hands up,” reads one AP headline from Monday. “County autopsy: Unarmed teen shot 6 to 8 times,” reads another.

According to an update on the story posted Monday night, the AP has since made changes to the two stories referenced in Scarry’s column:

UPDATE — 10:28 p.m. ET: Two of the AP stories referenced in this post were modified after this post published. One report changed the word “teen” in its headline to call Brown by his last name. The second removed the word “teen” from the body text and put “man” in its please. Neither report has an update on them with a reason for the alteration. Other reports still refer to Brown as a “teen.” We’ve once again requested comment from AP spokesman Paul Colford, who one other media reporter told us is “usually prompt” at returning media requests.

In light of the updates to the articles in question, one can’t help but wonder if the editors at the AP simply didn’t catch the errors or if they were hoping to not get caught. Regardless, it will certainly be worth keeping an eye on AP reports going forward.

“You got to ask the question: Why are [they] doing that,” Pat asked. “Why are [they] ignoring your own rules when that's what they call for? I don't know.”

Front page image courtesy of the AP

BIGGER than Tiananmen Square? Here's what the China protests are REALLY about

(Left) Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images/ (Right) Video screenshot

China has been locking its citizens down for over two years under its zero-COVID policy, and it's becoming more and more clear that this isn’t just about COVID but something much more serious: slavery and control. Now it looks like many citizens have had enough. Protests are currently spreading throughout China and, unlike during the Tiananmen Square protests, the word is getting out.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck looked into the protests' "real motivations," explained how they’re different from the 1989 protests at Tiananmen Square, and predicted how these events are a "game-changer for the entire world."

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

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The American Journey Experience is the new home of the car Orson Welles gave to Rita Hayworth. Orson Welles gave this car to his future wife Rita Hayworth for her 24th birthday.

George Orson Welles was an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter who is remembered for his innovative and influential work in film, radio and theatre. He is considered to be among the greatest and most influential filmmakers of all time and his work has had a great impact on American culture.

Every year as Thanksgiving approaches, the fear of politics being brought up at the dinner table is shared by millions around the country. But comedian Jamie Kilstein has a guide for what you should do to avoid the awkward political turmoil so you can enjoy stuffing your face full of turkey.

Kilstein joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to dissect exactly how you can handle those awkward, news-related discussions around the table on Thanksgiving and provided his 3-step guide to help you survive the holidays with your favorite, liberal relatives: Find common ground, don’t take obvious bait, and remember that winning an argument at the cost of a family member won’t fix the issue you’re arguing about.

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

On Friday, Mercury One hosted the 2022 ProFamily Legislators Conference at The American Journey Experience. Glenn Beck shared this wisdom with legislators from all across our nation. We must be on God’s side.