Mike Rowe details the incredible history that built America

Glenn interviewed Mike Rowe on radio about the upcoming special tomorrow night at 8pm only on TheBlaze called Building America, presented by Caterpillar. Mike chronicles the major engineering and infrastructure feats that began rapidly rising in the 1800’s that eventually formed the foundation America currently operates on. As with many of the Mike Rowe conversations, the use of his Facebook page to respond to people's criticism was a topic of conversation. Watch his interesting, truthful responses and hear his opinion on the America who built the Empire State Building versus the America of today below. Also, don't miss the preview for Building America!

GLENN: I have to tell you, one of my favorite Facebook pages is Mike Rowe's Facebook page. And it's really becoming something — it's almost becoming ritualistic now, where you just kind of gather kids around and you're like, hey, somebody is going to be really rude to Mike and Mike is going to answer them in just the most polite way and yet eviscerate them. There was one that came out last week that Jim Green posted a series of inflammatory points about Republicans with a lot of, you know, caps locked words about the — you know, about how bad Christians were and how bad, you know, Republicans were. And then he used a series of exclamation points after each. How could anyone on earth vote Republican? A reptile has more decency than Republicans in Congress, blah blah blah blah blah. I just want to read just a little bit of Mike Rowe's responses. "Jim, greetings from somewhere over Colorado. It appears you're still trying to sell your books on my Facebook page. Personally I haven't read them and based on your marketing strategy, I suspect I'm probably not alone. Since part of your approach seems to involve me, I thought perhaps I might offer you some unsolicited marketing advice. One, consider starting each blurb off with a friendly salutation. In my experience, a little cordiality goes a long way especially when you're trying to persuade someone to give you money. Two, think about addressing your audience as something other than racist reptiles and toads."

PAT: What? That's revolutionary.

GLENN: "Three, reconsider your commitment to caps and exclamation points. These are excellent choices when warning people of a fire, volcanic eruption or an Ebola outbreak. But I'm afraid your use in the context of a book sale implies a level of urgency that may exist only in your mind." He goes on. He is brilliant. And I am — I'm proud to call him a friend of the program. Mike Rowe, welcome to the program.

ROWE: Hello, Glenn. I'm just so loving the image like a family gathered around the laptop in much the way they might have done in the 1930s. And actually —

GLENN: It's like —

ROWE: A Facebook page.

GLENN: Going to Facebook and to the Mike Rowe Facebook page is like — like in the 1800s gathering around a Mark Twain novel or a — or an Edgar Allan Poe. You're like, here come the murderers in Rue Morgue. Here comes —

ROWE: Look, here's the really humbling and ugly reality about how all this unfolds. That post you were reading, I wrote at about 37,000 feet, somewhere over Colorado. And I really laughed because I think the last time I was with you, I read an ad called — you know, that old ad for Jordan.

GLENN: Yeah, yeah.

ROWE: Somewhere out of Laramie.

GLENN: Right.

ROWE: And it made me laugh and I'm just scrolling through my Facebook page. And honestly, I think you and I are both fairly unoffendable at this point in our lives. You've heard about everything you can hear. But what really struck me is as offensive about the guy really wasn't his world view. It was his marketing strategy. I just — I just couldn't — why would you hit me with such an inflammatory blurb eight times in a row? It's sort of the opposite of persuasive. And just as I was pondering that, the captain walked out and give me a plastic set of wings, you know, like I was an 8-year-old, which just made me laugh hysterically. So I'm sitting there sipping a cocktail, holding my plastic wings looking at this lunatic on my Facebook page, and that's how the response happens. You can't — you don't think about it. You just happen to be on a plane one day holding a set of plastic wings.

(laughing).

ROWE: Addressing a marketeer. And that's the life we live.

GLENN: I want to talk to you about a couple things. First of all, how's the show on CNN doing?

ROWE: Apparently we're still on. There's a certain ambiguity in the news business to tell people to please tune in Wednesdays at 9:00. We're in a world of riots, Ebola, and endless calamity, so the word pre-emption has become sort of a routine thing in my world now. The show is doing very well when you can find it. Wednesday —

GLENN: You sound happy.

ROWE: Where it actually appears, it's a crap shoot.

(overlapping speakers).

STU: Let me fill in the Mike Rowe details that he's not telling you. CNN's "Someone Gotta Do It" works up big ratings. TV ratings, CNN Mike Rowe, launched clobbers Rachel — I'm losing the headline. Mike Rowe's CNN premiere provides best original series Premier in x-amount of time. The show is huge, Mike.

PAT: And it's been re-upped, right, for another year?

ROWE: Yeah, they did pick it up. Very nice.

GLENN: May I just — your marketing strategy is a little confusing.

PAT: You might want to lead with that.

GLENN: You might want to use an exclamation point.

PAT: It's been re-upped! Wednesdays at 9:00.

ROWE: After that intro I'm scared to say anything about it. What network it is —

GLENN: You don't need to call yourself a reptile or toad here.

ROWE: My marketing strategy goes like this. Go ahead, find it, I dare you.

(laughing).

GLENN: All right. There's also something else that you have helped us with. "Building America," tonight, this is a — this is a project sponsored by Caterpillar and Mike is— is doing the voice-over work for it and actually appears on camera. Is that your house? Is that like a studio in your house or something?

ROWE: That's actually a guy that has a modest little studio down the street from me, so I just walked down and sat by a brick wall and told some stories. But this really goes back to — I think maybe the very first conversation you and I had when we met a couple years ago. And we were just kind of bemoaning the state of history. And by the state of history, I just mean the current enthusiasm for the wonder of it and for me, part of what's missing in the TV landscape is just a series of very simple shows that reminds people of the Herculean, if I can use the term, the Herculean tasks and the undertakings that the people who built this country faced. How they overcame them. You're not going to hear anything new in terms of, oh, gees, I didn't know there was a Golden Gate Bridge or Brooklyn bridge or the railroads. These are, you know, topics we all kind of probably remember from 8th and 9th grade but maybe we don't remember and maybe we've forgotten some key things and the people who were responsible for literally connecting the country in every single way that matters from an infrastructure standpoint. So when you guys said you were going to really approach that topic in a straightforward way, I talked to my buddies at Caterpillar and they said, look, we love it, too, obviously. We've got a hand in the infrastructure. So long story short, I said for God's sake, send me a script and I'll read it and I did and I think you're airing it —

GLENN: Tomorrow night at 8:00. And we won't be pre-empting for —

PAT: Any coverage.

GLENN: Any coverage.

ROWE: You spoil me.

GLENN: "Building America," Thursday at 8:00 p.m. That's tomorrow night with Mike Rowe only on TheBlaze TV. You know, when you hear the stories of — when you hear the stories of, for instance, the Empire State Building and how this thing was built in 11 months and how the steel —

PAT: Unthinkable now, right?

GLENN: It was poured in Pittsburgh. And it was still warm as the riveters were sitting on it trying in the rivets. It was still warm. It was moving that fast. That never would be done now. Never be done.

ROWE: Just the business of driving in a rivet is a thing that I bet 99% of the country doesn't really understand. We know what the words mean. We know driving in a — and most of us can visualize a rivet. But the rivets that held the bridge together, that held the Empire State Building together, these things weighed 20, 30 pounds apiece in some cases and just the business of moving them around and hammering them in. It's just — it's epic. It's — that's a word — that's thrown around all the time but it truly is epic.

GLENN: I can't get over the fact that these guys were throwing these rivets to each other.

ROWE: Yeah.

GLENN: I would be so afraid I would fall. OSHA would never let you do this.

ROWE: OSHA?

(laughing).

Listen, I mean, you simply couldn't have done the things that were done. Look, there was a pricee to pay, no doubt. Building, the transcontinental railroads was a bloodbath. The Brooklyn bridge was tough. You know, but the idea of construction under water.

GLENN: Oh, yeah.

ROWE: It was kind of primitive. Caissons, getting the bends. When we didn't know even when decompression sickness was or nitrogen narcosis or anything like that. It was a brave new world. And I think we're just disconnected from it today in a way that we probably shouldn't be.

GLENN: So here's — I want to see if you think this is good news or bad news. There's a story out today from La Figaro newspaper in France that says —

ROWE: Bad news.

GLENN: That says that — I think you're going to change your opinion. That says that the French Jihadists who are now writing letters to their parents from Syria who have joined ISIS are now saying they want to come home and I've got to just read a couple of these. One French Jihadist wrote to his parents, I'm fed up, mom and dad. My iPod doesn't work here anymore. I have to come back. So as we're talking about the rivets, as we're talking about hard work, and I think the same thing is happening with Ferguson. It's not yet, but I think the minute it starts to get cold, Jihadists, revolutionaries, pretty much everybody is like, you know what, it's cold.

ROWE: Nobody told me it was going to be cold. Where is my fleece.

PAT: I'm going home.

ROWE: You know what? You should turn your satirical cannons toward — I don't know if your audience remembers. You will, Allan Sherman I think wrote, "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh."

GLENN: Yeah, yeah.

ROWE: You should write the Jihadist —

GLENN: That sounds totally politically correct. Totally safe. Non-boycottable.

ROWE: I don't see what could possibly go wrong.

(laughing).

PAT: Mike, we understand that you're still getting — are you still getting flack from the one voice-over thing you did for the WalMart commercial where they announced a quarter of a trillion-dollar initiative to bring back manufacturing to America? Are you still getting flack for that?

ROWE: Yeah, it pops up once in a while. In fact, it did yesterday. I had another rant on a plane that I put up yesterday. But a kid from Solon wrote an article just, you know, the usual stuff. Very upset that — you know, I'm a hypocrite.

PAT: That you would do such a thing.

ROWE: That and the other and WalMart is bad for this, that, and the other. Of course it's still out there. It has nothing to do — you know, people are looking for things to pivot off of in order to come back and make whatever point ultimately they need to make. This thing was so convoluted, I mean, it's actually worth looking at just because it's a study in dubious rhetoric. But I had done an AMA, which is an Ask Me Anything, on Reddit, which is a big website that people go to and they'll ask you anything over the course of an hour. And this writer really took offense to the fact that of the 4,500 questions I was asked, I only answered about 60, which is you know, like one a minute. But one of the ones I didn't answer was a question that said, would you work a shift at a WalMart on a Black Friday. And so he wrote about 700 words, maybe a thousand, based on the fact that my failure to answer that question was indicative of my deep-steeded tacit disdain for the everyday worker and my quiet nefarious association with my evil overlords in corporate America.

GLENN: Well, I will tell you this. And I think — it's what I heard and I think all of America heard. You'll notice he still did not answer the question. He still has not answered that.

PAT: Still won't. Still won't.

GLENN: And it's really what America wants to know. Will Mike Rowe work at a WalMart on Black Friday.

ROWE: The short answer is my plans for Black Friday included a list of activities that precluded me from leaving my apartment. So no —

GLENN: So wait a minute, you're telling me you wouldn't work at WalMart and you wouldn't fight over panties at Victoria's Secret?

ROWE: I wouldn't want to be in involved in the selling of undergarments on Black Friday in any establishment for really any amount of recompense.

GLENN: When you see what happens on Black Friday, what the hell have we turned into, Mike?

ROWE: That's it, right? The pursuit of happiness has become the pursuit of spending and our relationship with debt really is about as disconnected as our relationship from the people who built the icons we were talking about a couple of minutes ago. We just don't know our butt from a hot rock. And it reality is — it's an extraordinary thing to see that level of excitement matriculate in a grown-up over the prospect of saving 40 or 50% on some shiny toy that is doomed and destined to malfunction within two years of its purchase and occupy valuable space in the garage which is attached to the home which is too large and is probably too difficult to afford anyway. And so around and around we go. We buy stuff because it fills a hole somewhere.

GLENN: Talking to Mike Rowe, one last question. I believe my grandfather was, you know, World War II, greatest American generation. I think he would have wanted to beat 70% of this population to death with a shovel. How about your grandfather?

ROWE: If the shovel was made in the USA, my guess is he would not only have used it to subdue the masses. He would have helped dig their necessary —

GLENN: Bury the wealth. And then deep so you know, they wouldn't be dug up by dogs. He was respectful.

ROWE: It is a heck of a thing to watch what happens, you know. I mean, there's nothing new to say about consumerism, but it is alarming the way the events get stacked up, you know, from Black Friday to Cyber Monday and whatever the weekend in between is and. It really doesn't seem to stop.

GLENN: Check out the latest on Mike Rowe at ProfoundlyDisconnected.com. His Facebook page is the best. He's on CNN tonight, assuming that there's not a rainstorm or a rain shower or a sprinkle someplace.

(laughing).

GLENN: And for sure he will be on TheBlaze tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m. "Building America," new series sponsored by Caterpillar, tomorrow night 8:00 p.m. only on TheBlaze TV. Mike, thanks a lot. Appreciate it, man.

ROWE: Hey, all kidding aside, watching building America with your kids is probably a better snapshot than you're gonna get in most schools right now of what mattered and what happened in terms of our infrastructure. It's a good thing and I'm glad you guys did it.

GLENN: Thank you very much, Mike. Appreciate your help. God bless.

5 SURPRISING ways space tech is used in your daily life

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Is your vacuum cleaner from SPACE?

This week, Glenn is discussing his recent purchase of a Sputnik satellite, which has got many of us thinking about space and space technology. More specifically, we've been wondering how technology initially designed for use outside Earth's atmosphere impacted our lives down here on terra firma. The U.S. spent approximately $30 billion ($110 billion in today's money) between the Soviet launch of Sputnik in 1957 and the Moon Landing in 1969. What do we have to show for it besides some moon rocks?

As it turns out, a LOT of tech originally developed for space missions has made its way into products that most people use every day. From memory foam to cordless vacuums here are 5 pieces of space tech that you use every day:

Cellphone camera

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Have you ever seen a photograph of an early camera, the big ones with the tripod and curtain, and wondered how we went from that to the tiny little cameras that fit inside your cellphone? Thank NASA for that brilliant innovation. When you are launching a spaceship or satellite out of the atmosphere, the space onboard comes at a premium. In order to make more room for other equipment, NASA wanted smaller, lighter cameras without compromising image quality, and the innovations made to accomplish this goal paved the way for the cameras in your phone.

Cordless vacuums and power tools

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When exploring the moon, NASA wanted astronauts to use a drill to collect samples from the lunar surface. The problem: the moon has a severe lack of electrical outlets to power the drills. NASA tasked Black & Decker with developing a battery-powered motor powerful enough to take chunks out of the moon. The resulting motor was later adapted to power cordless power tools and vacuums in households across America.

Infrared ear thermometer

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What do distant stars and planets have in common with your eardrum? Both have their temperature read by the same infrared technology. The thermometers that can be found in medicine cabinets and doctors' offices across the world can trace their origins back to the astronomers at NASA who came up with the idea to measure the temperature of distant objects by the infrared light they emit.

Grooved pavement

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This one may seem obvious, but sometimes you need a massively complicated problem to come up with simple solutions. During the Space Shuttle program, NASA had a big problem: hydroplaning. Hydroplaning is dangerous enough when you are going 70 miles an hour in your car, but when you're talking about a Space Shuttle landing at about 215 miles per hour, it's an entirely different animal. So what was NASA's space-age solution? Cutting grooves in the pavement to quickly divert water off the runway, a practice now common on many highways across the world.

Memory foam

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If you've ever slept on a memory foam mattress, it probably won't come as a shock to find out that the foam was created to cushion falls from orbit. Charles Yotes was an astronautical engineer who is credited with the invention of memory foam. Yotes developed the technology for the foam while working on the recovery system for the Apollo command module. The foam was originally designed to help cushion the astronauts and their equipment during their descent from space. Now, the space foam is used to create some of the most comfortable mattresses on Earth. Far out.

5 most HORRIFIC practices condoned by WPATH

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Whatever you know about the "trans movement" is only the tip of the iceberg.

In a recent Glenn TV special, Glenn delved into Michael Schellenberger's "WPATH files," a collection of leaked internal communications from within the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). Glenn's research team got their hands on the WPATH files and compiled the highlights in Glenn's exclusive PDF guide which can be downloaded here. These documents reveal the appalling "standards" created and upheld by WPATH, which appear to be designed to allow radical progressive surgeons to perform bizarre, experimental, and mutilating surgeries on the dime of insurance companies rather than to protect the health and well-being of their patients. These disturbing procedures are justified in the name of "gender-affirming care" and are defended zealously as "life-saving" by the dogmatic surgeons who perform them.

The communications leaked by Schellenberger reveal one horrific procedure after another committed in the name of and defended by radical gender ideology and WPATH fanatics. Here are five of the most horrifying practices condoned by WPATH members:

1.Trans surgeries on minors as young as 14

One particular conversation was initiated by a doctor asking for advice on performing irreversible male-to-female surgery on a 14-year-old boy's genitals. WPATH doctors chimed in encouraging the surgery. One doctor, Dr. McGinn, confessed that he had performed 20 such surgeries on minors over the last 17 years!

2.Amputation of healthy, normal limbs

BIID, or Body Integrity Identity Disorder, is an “extremely rare phenomenon of persons who desire the amputation of one or more healthy limbs or who desire a paralysis.” As you might suspect, some WPATH members are in favor of enabling this destructive behavior. One WPATH commenter suggested that people suffering from BIID received "hostile" treatment from the medical community, many of whom would recommend psychiatric care over amputation. Apparently, telling people not to chop off perfectly healthy limbs is now considered "violence."

3.Trans surgeries on patients with severe mental illnesses

WPATH claims to operate off of a principle known as "informed consent," which requires doctors to inform patients of the risks associated with a procedure. It also requires patients be in a clear state of mind to comprehend those risks. However, this rule is taken very lightly among many WPATH members. When one of the so-called "gender experts" asked about the ethicality of giving hormones to a patient already diagnosed with several major mental illnesses, they were met with a tidal wave of backlash from their "enlightened" colleges.

4.Non-standard procedures, such as “nullification” and other experimental, abominable surgeries

If you have never heard of "nullification" until now, consider yourself lucky. Nullification is the removal of all genitals, intending to create a sort of genderless person, or a eunuch. But that's just the beginning. Some WPATH doctors admitted in these chatlogs that they weren't afraid to get... creative. They seemed willing to create "custom" genitals for these people that combine elements of the two natural options.

5.Experimental, untested, un-researched, use of carcinogenic drugs 

Finasteride is a drug used to treat BPH, a prostate condition, and is known to increase the risk of high-grade prostate cancer as well as breast cancer. Why is this relevant? When a WPATH doctor asked if anyone had used Finasteride "to prevent bottom growth," which refers to the healthy development of genitals during puberty. The answer from the community was, "That's a neat idea, someone should give it a go."

If your state isn’t on this list, it begs the question... why?

The 2020 election exposed a wide range of questionable practices, much of which Glenn covered in a recent TV special. A particularly sinister practice is the use of private money to fund the election. This money came from a slew of partisan private sources, including Mark Zuckerberg, entailed a host of caveats and conditions and were targeted at big city election offices— predominantly democratic areas. The intention is clear: this private money was being used to target Democrat voters and to facilitate their election process over their Republican counterparts.

The use of private funds poses a major flaw in the integrity of our election, one which many states recognized and corrected after the 2020 election. This begs the question: why haven't all states banned private funding in elections? Why do they need private funding? Why don't they care about the strings attached?

Below is the list of all 28 states that have banned private funding in elections. If you don't see your state on this list, it's time to call your state's election board and demand reform.

Alabama

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Arizona

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Arkansas

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Florida

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Georgia

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Idaho

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Indiana

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Iowa

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Kansas

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Kentucky

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Louisiana

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Mississippi

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Missouri

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Montana

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Nebraska

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North Carolina

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North Dakota

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Ohio

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Oklahoma

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Pennsylvania

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South Carolina

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South Dakota

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Tennessee

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Texas

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Utah

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Virginia

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West Virginia

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Wisconsin

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POLL: Was Malaysia Flight 370 taken by a WORMHOLE?

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It's hard to know what's real and what's fake anymore.

With the insanity that seems to grow every day, it is becoming more and more difficult to tell what's true and what's not, what to believe, and what to reject. Anything seems possible.

That's why Glenn had Ashton Forbes on his show, to explore the fringe what most people would consider impossible. Forbes brought Glenn a fascinating but far-out theory that explains the decade-old disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 along with riveting footage that supposedly corroborates his story. Like something out of a sci-fi novel, Forbes made the startling claim that Flight 370 was TELEPORTED via a U.S. military-made wormhole! As crazy as that sounds, the video footage along with Forbes' scientific research made an interesting, if not compelling case.

But what do you think? Do you believe that the U.S. Government can create wormholes? Did they use one to abduct Flight 370? Is the government hiding futuristic tech from the rest of the world? Let us know in the poll below:

Does the military have the capability to create wormholes?

Is the U.S. military somehow responsible for what happened to Malaysia Flight 370?

Is the military in possession of technology beyond what we believe to be possible?

Do you think American military tech is ahead of the other superpowers?

Do you think there would be negative consequences if secret government technology was leaked?