Glenn Finally Has Something Nice to Say About Trump

Donald Trump gave the convocation at Liberty University on January 18, 2016. Glenn watched and listened, hoping to form a positive opinion he could share about Trump. It worked!

Proud and Protestant

The real estate mogul was loud and proud about his brand of religion: "I'm a Protestant. I'm very proud of it. Presbyterian to be exact. But I'm very proud of it. Very, very proud of it."

Two Corinthians Walk Into a Bar

Trump also quoted scripture, but it was a little awkward. His staff must have forgotten to prep him on the correct way to reference 2 Corinthians, so it came out "two Corinthians" and not "second Corinthians." The crowd responded with nervous laughter. Glenn thought Trump was telling a joke.

Let's Be Honest

A lot of people believe in God, but may not be regular church attenders or bible readers. It happens a lot, in fact, and that's okay---unless someone tries to make it sound like he is an active churchgoer or bible reader. Trump seems to fall into that category. It doesn't make him the devil or anything, but that whole honesty-is-the-best-policy thing is usually a good way to go.

Common Sense Bottom Line

After watching Donald Trump's convocation remarks at Liberty University, Glenn did some soul searching and realized he could actually say something positive about Donald Trump. Here's the good news according to Glenn: "I'm absolutely, positively sure that Donald Trump is not the Antichrist."

Enjoy this complimentary clip from The Glenn Beck Program:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors:

GLENN: Yesterday, Donald Trump was at Liberty University. And I was listening and watching what he had to say. And I thought to myself, "I have something good to say about him." And I want you to listen to this. Here it is.

DONALD: I'm a Protestant. I'm very proud of it. Presbyterian to be exact. But I'm very proud of it. Very, very proud of it. And we've got to protect -- because bad things are happening. Two Corinthians. Right? Two Corinthians 3:17. That's the whole ball game. Where the spirit of the Lord -- right?

(laughing)

GLENN: Stop. Stop. They're laughing. They're laughing at him. Because the first time I heard this, I thought he was saying, two Corinthians, you know, two Corinthians, they walk into the bar --

PAT: And there's three Thessalonians across the bar from him.

GLENN: Like, you three Thessalonians, us two Corinthians are going to kick your butt.

PAT: Then two Johns come in. Wait. I think it's 2 John, and I think it's 2 Corinthians.

GLENN: Yeah. So they're laughing. They're actually at his -- listening to him and they're laughing at him. You can hear them laughing in the background. And he doesn't know. And it's really bad because it shows that no one on his staff went before and said, "No, no. Don, it's 2 Corinthians. Remember, 2 Corinthians." I got it. I got it. Two Corinthians. "No, it's 2 Corinthians. That's really important. Everyone will know you've never picked up a Bible in your life if you say two Corinthians."

STU: Yeah. He's never looked at it before. Let's be honest about it.

GLENN: No, he's never heard anybody say, I want to read from 2 Corinthians.

STU: Which is fine.

PAT: Which is fine.

GLENN: No, it's totally fine. Totally fine.

PAT: It's only not fine when you're pretending.

STU: Yeah, when you're lying about it.

GLENN: Yeah, because I think there's a special I'm sorry place for you to go to if you're lying about the Bible. You know what I mean?

STU: Not if you're lying for your own personal benefit though. That's much better, right?

GLENN: If you're lying for personal gain, no. There's a special I'm sorry place where you're required to say I'm sorry.

STU: Really? So if you're lying about God for your own personal gain, that's somehow bad?

GLENN: That's somehow bad. I don't know all the ins and outs of that. Do you guys want to hear the good news?

STU: I thought that was it, like he actually pronounced Corinthians correct.

GLENN: No, I honestly was waiting for the joke. Two Corinthians, right? That's the whole ballgame. Two Corinthians, they walk into the bar -- I was expecting him to go there.

Here's the good news. I haven't been able to say this about Bill Clinton, although I was a little wishy-washy about Bill Clinton. I was more convinced on Barack Obama, all right? But I'm absolutely positively sure that Donald Trump is not the Antichrist.

STU: Really?

GLENN: Yeah, because I think the Antichrist would be more clever than saying two Corinthians. He knew both of them, am I right, Pat? He knew both the first Corinthian and the second Corinthian that wrote that thing.

(laughter)

STU: So I'm reading P-salms.

GLENN: P-salms is great. It's great.

STU: It's not as good as The Art Of the Deal.

GLENN: So you know the Antichrist is not going to say, I was reading P-salms.

STU: Right.

GLENN: You got that down. You got that down. So he's not the Antichrist. That's something we could say that's good.

STU: Though I would expect the Antichrist would come up with a trick to make you believe that he's not the Antichrist.

GLENN: I have thought about that. Because I thought about that with Clinton. And I thought about it deeply with this guy. I don't think so.

PAT: I think he's more suave too. I personally believe that the Antichrist will be more suave than Donald Trump. Don't you think so? He'll dress better even though he's a billionaire. He'll look better, even though this guy is a billionaire. I think he will.

GLENN: I don't think so. I think the Antichrist can look an awful lot like al-Baghdadi. I'm just saying could look like al-Baghdadi. Not necessarily al-Baghdadi.

PAT: Uh-huh.

STU: Hmm.

GLENN: That's starting his own army of Armageddon. I'm just saying.

PAT: Well, he certainly is not suave. So that wouldn't fit --

GLENN: No. No.

STU: I think people now will is he with us now? (?)

GLENN: I thought he was for Cruz.

STU: Yeah, no.

GLENN: Now, he's saying he's not the Antichrist. I don't know. Maybe he's for Trump.

STU: You're a political chameleon. You really are.

GLENN: I really am. Okay. All right. So we have that.

STU: I can't believe the actual two Corinthians thing happened, and it happened at liberty, Right?

GLENN: Yeah, listen to it again. And listen to the crowd. It's sad. (?)

DONALD: I'm a protestant. I'm very proud of it. Presbyterian to be exact. But I'm very proud of it. Very, very proud of it. And we've got to protect because bad things are happening. Two Corinthians, right? Two Corinthians 3:17. That's the whole ball game. Where the spirit of the Lord -- right? Where the spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. And here this is Liberty College, Liberty University, but it is so true.

STU: That's so sad. He's just trying -- somebody was like, what if you read this and it kind of sounds like liberty?

PAT: But, again, nobody in his camp knew it was 2 Corinthians. No one said that to him.

GLENN: Or they just expected him to know. Here is this.

STU: Yeah, they probably expected him to know.

GLENN: I mean, I quoted that, when I was at Liberty University. There is liberty.

STU: But you knew it was second --

GLENN: Well, it's two Corinthians. I don't know which one wrote it. Either the second Corinthian or the first Corinthian. Sure, one was great. But when they got their heads together and there were two of them. You should see what they said. Back in a minute.

Featured Image: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers the convocation at the Vines Center on the campus of Liberty University January 18, 2016 in Lynchburg, Virginia. A billionaire real estate mogul and reality television personality, Trump addressed students and guests at the non-profit, private Christian university that was founded in 1971 by evangelical Southern Baptist televangelist Jerry Falwell. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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George Orson Welles was an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter who is remembered for his innovative and influential work in film, radio and theatre. He is considered to be among the greatest and most influential filmmakers of all time and his work has had a great impact on American culture.

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Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

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Watch the video clip below or find the full podcast with Winston Marshall here.


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.