Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Four-Part Series

This week marks the 53rd anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s I Have a Dream speech. Most people know that MLK was a Baptist minister and civil rights hero. They know a holiday exists to honor him. But who was MLK, really, and what did he accomplish? This four-part series explores MLK's life and his legacy.

Listen to the full segment:

Martin Luther King, Jr. Part I

In 1760, the freedom of thought had not yet been born. It took courage to speak one's mind. So just a few years later, when Thomas Jefferson scribbled these words on paper, it was not only an act of courage, but of treason:

We find these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, with certain unalienable rights, given to them by their creator. Among them, life, liberty and property.

"Property" was later changed to "the pursuit of happiness" to ensure the slave trade would come to an end. Do Americans understand the impact of that change?

More than 200 years later, a black preacher from the South, Dr. Martin Luther King, courageously spoke out to make the promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness a reality for all Americans.

We will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholic will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!

---Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Part II

Who was civil rights icon Martin Luther King? Was he a social justice warrior who believed communism was the answer? Did he believe in Democratic or Republican principles? One need look no further than King himself for the answers.

MLK in his own words:

On Communism

"It so happens that communism is a system that I disagree with philosophically. I would not prefer to live under a communist system. I happen to feel that the great moments of history have been those moments when individuals have been left free to think and to act. And I feel that communism often stands in the way of certain First Amendment privileges that we have in America, for instance, that I just couldn't adjust to."

On Republicans

"Well, they're certainly for civil rights and calling upon the Republican Party to take a forthright and positive position on civil rights."

At the time of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, 80 percent of Republicans supported civil rights compared to only 64 percent of Democrats. Prominent Democrats like LBJ initially fought against the Civil Rights Bill, seeking to weaken it. Al Gore's father opposed it, along with Klan member and Democratic senator Robert Byrd, and Democratic governor George Wallace.

Martin Luther King's close childhood friend Bruce Bizard emphatically believed King was a Republican:

Martin Luther King, Jr. was Republican because his dad, first of all, was a Republican. He was the headshot. He was the head of the family. And if his dad was a Republican, then the entire household was Republican.

Bishop Jim Lowe of Guiding Light Church, who was injured in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four little black girls in 1963, had this to say about the ideology of Martin Luther King:

Dr. King would be conservative. Come on, now, there's no question about that. And he would be, he would be ostracized and condemned by many, many black people, because a lot of part of what was going on, they were turning against him then because they wanted a faster action. He had to deal with the thing. He had to deal with the Black Panthers then. He had to deal with the Stokten Carmichaels and the radicals that were there. But in spite of what he had to deal with his own people, he still held fast to the truth of the Word of God.

King's niece Alveda King believes her uncle wasn't a member of either party.

He was not a Democrat or a Republican during his lifetime. He said that himself. He calls, I think, during his lifetime, Democrats were Dixiecrats, you know. And so he says, "I'm not a Dixiecrat, nor a member of the Republican Party. I need to be able to speak to everybody."

King's legacy and message have been twisted and contorted by men conspiring to promote their own agendas of self-interest. Along the way, his simplest and purest message has been lost or scattered:

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.

It is the quintessential conservative message: Judge me by my actions, by my contributions, by my merit.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Part III

Martin Luther King, Jr. was a complicated man, both champion of equal rights and unfaithful reverend to his devoted wife. This dichotomy has made him a difficult figure to understand and label. The left has elevated him to near Mount Olympus status, while the right has told of his communist leanings and immoral activities.

While King railed against racial and economic injustice, he also denounced LBJ's Great Society. While many King supporters believe he wanted socialism, he spoke out against communism. While appearing the devoted husband, wiretaps approved by then Attorney General Robert Kennedy, revealed King's multiple affairs. He was accused of plagiarizing both his Ph.D. dissertation from Boston University and I Have a Dream speech. The former is true; the latter is not.

Clearly, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a complex and deeply flawed man. Whatever MLK believed ideologically, whatever his moral flaws, his success in moving a nation forward on civil rights --- with love and nonviolence --- should be admired and emulated.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Part IV

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X shared a common goal: Civil rights for black Americans --- but they had very different philosophies about how to reach that goal. Malcolm X embraced violence and openly attacked MLK's strategy of non-violent resistance, calling it "psychologically insecure." However, King's philosophy did include resistance in a "very strong and determined manner" without the use of violence.

King never wavered from this belief, and his methods worked. In 1964, Congress, led by Republicans, finally passed the Civil Rights Bill, which had been delayed repeatedly, as well as opposed and voraciously fought against by Democrats for decades. But the tide had turned to side with reason and right.

After listening to Congress debate the bill, Martin Luther King made his way through the throngs of admirers on Capitol Hill when a tall, lanky man stepped out of the crowd.

"Well, Malcolm, it's good to see you," said Martin Luther King.

"It's good to see you too," replied Malcolm X.

Those were virtually all the two icons ever said to each other, in their only face-to-face meeting. Many have said that Malcolm X was beginning to moderate his views, eventually appreciating King's successful, non-violent approach.

In February 1965, violence visited Malcolm X when he was assassinated by members of the Nation of Islam. Three years later, the peacemaker Martin Luther King, Jr. would also be assassinated. Robert F. Kennedy, the man who had approved wiretapping MLK's activities, made the announcement to a stunned and horrified crowd.

I'm only going to talk to you for just a minute or so this evening because I have some very sad news for all of you, and I think sad news for all of our fellow citizens and people who love peace all over the world. And that is that Martin Luther King was shot and was killed tonight in Memphis, Tennessee.

While Martin Luther King, Jr. was not able to fully realize his dreams, he did inspire a nation to dream on:

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."

Listen to all serials at glennbeck.com/serials

Shortly after appearing on "The Glenn Beck Radio Program" last Thursday, Los Angeles-based emergency medicine specialist Dr. Simone Gold got a call saying she was fired for speaking out about the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine in a now-banned viral video.

Dr. Gold returned to the radio program Monday to detail exactly what happened, the reason the hospitals gave for her firing, and how they threatened to fire her colleagues as well if she "didn't go quietly."

"Most emergency physicians work at more than one [hospital], as I do, and I've actually been fired from both," she told Glenn. "They told me that I appeared in an embarrassing video, and therefore, I would no longer be welcome to work there ... then they said, if I didn't go quietly and I made a fuss, they would have all the doctors in the group, you know, they'd have to go and they'll get a whole new doctor group."

Dr. Gold said she does not regret speaking out about hydroxychloroquine during the controversial "White Coat Summit" news conference held in Washington, D.C., last week. A video of the news conference quickly went viral on social media before being removed by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others for allegedly making false claims related to COVID-19.

"Bring it on," she said. "I want to continue to live in America. I want my children to continue to live in America. I don't want them to grow up in a place like China. When you get to a point where, not only can I not speak as a scientist, as a doctor, for what I know to be absolutely true, but you then want to cancel me and my colleagues, this is not okay. I would much rather fight than not fight ... and I want everybody to know that there are literally millions and millions of Americans who are on our side. Millions. I believe it's the majority."

Glenn then asked Dr. Gold to weigh in on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's new guidelines encouraging schools to reopen in the fall and the left's relentless drive to keep them closed.

"There's no actual scientific debate whatsoever if schools should open. None. There's no scientific debate. There's no serious person who thinks schools shouldn't open. Now, [through] some governors and policy makers, there's pressure being brought to bear on school districts, but there's no actual scientific debate. So it's going to come down to parents pressuring their local school districts to act in a responsible fashion."

Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation:


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Fox News host Greg Gutfeld joined Glenn on "The Glenn Beck Podcast" this week to talk about his new book, "The Plus: Self-Help for People Who Hate Self-Help."

Greg admits he is probably the last person who should write a self-help book. Nevertheless, he offers his offbeat advice on how to save America during what has become one of the most tumultuous times in history, as well as drinking while tweeting (spoiler: don't do it).

He also shares his "evolution" on President Donald Trump, his prediction for the election, and what it means to be an agnostic-atheist.

In this clip, Greg shares what he calls his "first great epiphany" on how dangerous cancel culture has become.

"I believe that cancel culture is the first successful work-around of the First Amendment," he said. "Because freedom of speech doesn't protect me from my career being ruined, my livelihood being destroyed, or me getting so depressed I commit suicide. Cancel culture is the first successful work-around of freedom of speech. It can oppress your speech with the scepter of destruction. We don't have freedom of speech anymore."

Watch the video clip below or find the full Glenn Beck Podcast with Greg Gutfeld here.

Want to listen to more Glenn Beck podcasts?

Subscribe to Glenn Beck's channel on YouTube for FREE access to more of his masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, or subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Use code UNMASKED to save $20 on one year of BlazeTV.

Dr. Simone Gold joined Glenn Beck on the radio program Thursday to set the record straight about hydroxychloroquine -- what it is, how it works, and the real reason for all the current controversy surrounding a centuries-old medication.

Dr. Gold is a board certified emergency physician. She graduated from Chicago Medical School before attending Stanford University Law School. She completed her residency in emergency medicine at Stony Brook University Hospital in New York, and worked in Washington D.C. for the Surgeon General, as well for the chairman of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. She works as an emergency physician on the front lines, whether or not there is a pandemic, and her clinical work serves all Americans from urban inner city to suburban and the Native American population. Her legal practice focuses on policy issues relating to law and medicine.

She is also the founder of America's frontline doctors, a group of doctors who have been under attack this week for speaking out about hydroxychloroquine during a news conference held outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington D.C.

On the program, Dr. Gold emphasized that the controversy over hydroxychloroquine is a "complete myth."

"Hydroxychloroquine is an analogue or a derivative of quinine, which is found in tree bark. It's the most noncontroversial of medications that there is," she explained.

"It's been around for centuries and it's been FDA-approved in the modern version, called hydroxychloroquine, for 65 years. In all of that time, [doctors] used it for breast-feeding women, pregnant women, elderly, children, and immune compromised. The typical use is for years or even decades because we give it mostly to RA, rheumatoid arthritis patients and lupus patients who need to be on it, essentially, all of their life. So, we have extensive experience with it ... it's one of the most commonly used medications throughout the world."

Dr. Gold told Glenn she was surprised when the media suddenly "vomited all over hydroxychloroquine", but initially chalked it up to the left's predictable hatred for anything President Donald Trump endorses. However, when the media gave the drug Remdesivir glowing reviews, despite disappointing clinical trial results, she decided to do some research.

"[Remdesivir] certainly wasn't a fabulous drug, but the media coverage was all about how fabulous it was. At that moment, I thought that was really weird. Because it's one thing to hate hydroxychloroquine because the president [endorsed] it. But it's another thing to give a free pass to another medicine that doesn't seem that great. I thought that was really weird, so I started looking into it. And let me tell you, what I discovered was absolutely shocking," she said.

Watch the video below for more details:


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

According to the mainstream media's COVID-19 narrative, the president is "ignoring" the crisis.

On tonight's "Glenn TV" special, Glenn Beck exposes the media's last four months of political theater that has helped shape America's confusion and fear over coronavirus. And now, with a new school year looming on the horizon, the ongoing hysteria has enormous ramifications for our children, but the media is working overtime to paint the Trump administration as anti-science Neanderthals who want to send children and teachers off to die by reopening schools.

Glenn fights back with the facts and interviews the medical doctor Big Tech fears the most. Dr. Simone Gold, founder of America's Frontline Doctors, stands up to the media's smear campaign and explains why she could no longer stay silent in her fight against coronavirus fear.

Watch a preview below:


In order to watch tonight's episode, you must be a BlazeTV subscriber. Join today to get a 30-day free trial, and get $20 off a one-year subscription with code UNMASKED.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.