1916 Called and It Thinks 2016 Rocks: What a Difference 100 Years Made

What was the life expectancy for the average man 100 years ago? If you had a car, where could you buy gas? How much did the average worker make annually?

"One hundred years ago, if you had a car, the only place you could buy gasoline was at the drugstore. Only 14 percent of all homes in the United States had a bathtub. Only eight percent had a telephone," Glenn read Thursday on his radio program.

In addition, only six percent of Americans graduated from high school. The average worker made between $200 and $400 a year, and substances like marijuana, heroin and morphine were available over-the-counter at local drugstores.

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"Back then, your local pharmacist would say, Heroin will clean your complexion, and it gives you buoyancy of the mind," Glenn said.

"Fact," Jeffy chimed in without fact-checking.

Read below or listen to the full segment for answers to these ancient questions:

• What did 90 percent of all doctors not have?

• How often did women wash their hair?

• How many stars did the American flag have?

• What law did Canada pass about poor people?

• How many people lived in Las Vegas?

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors:

GLENN: This is how much times have changed in 100 years.

One hundred years ago, the life expectancy for the average man was 47 years. A hundred years ago, in the United States, the average man lived to 47.

PAT: Okay.

GLENN: That's incredible.

PAT: Is it longer than that now?

GLENN: I want to hit you.

(chuckling)

One hundred years ago, if you had a car, the only place you could buy gasoline was at the drugstore. Only 14 percent of all homes in the United States -- one hundred years ago -- had a bathtub. Only eight percent had a telephone. The maximum speed limit in most cities was ten.

The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower.

PAT: Wow.

GLENN: The average wage for a citizen in the US was 22 cents an hour. The average worker made between 200 and $400 a year. A competent accountant could expect to earn $2,000 a year. A dentist could make $2,500 a year. A vet could make between $1,500 and $4,000 a year. A mechanical engineer was making five grand a year.

More than 95 percent of births took place at home, where they never charged you to hold your baby.

Ninety percent of all doctors --

PAT: Uh-huh.

GLENN: -- didn't have this.

What do you think it was?

PAT: Leprosy.

GLENN: Good point. Probably.

STU: Probably in excess of 90. Yeah.

PAT: I would think so. Syphilis?

GLENN: Nope.

JEFFY: A degree.

GLENN: Degree.

JEFFY: Yeah.

PAT: Ninety percent of doctors!

GLENN: Ninety percent of doctors had no college degree.

STU: Wow.

JEFFY: Those were good times.

PAT: How'd they become doctors?

JEFFY: Because you got to say it.

PAT: No.

GLENN: You would go to a so-called --

PAT: A doctor trade school or something?

GLENN: Yeah, you would go to a doctor trade school. You would go to a so-called medical school, but those ended because the medical schools were pretty much a scam.

Sugar at the time cost 4 cents a pound. Eggs were 14 cents a dozen. Coffee, 15 cents a pound. Most women washed their hair how many times a month?

PAT: Once.

GLENN: Once.

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: Most women washed their hair once a month 100 years ago.

JEFFY: They would go down to the stream once a month.

PAT: Wow.

GLENN: And what did they use to wash it?

PAT: Soap.

GLENN: Uh-uh.

JEFFY: Lard.

PAT: Brylcreem.

GLENN: Egg yolks or borax.

PAT: Borax?

GLENN: Yep.

JEFFY: Lard would have been better.

GLENN: Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from entering into their country for any reason.

The five leading causes of death were pneumonia and the flue, tuberculosis, diarrhea, heart disease, and the stroke.

PAT: You died from diarrhea?

GLENN: Oh, yeah. That's -- what's that called?

PAT: Is that consumption?

GLENN: No, the consumption is tuberculosis.

PAT: Is it?

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: Okay.

GLENN: Diarrhea was --

PAT: Well, diarrhea, because they called it something else.

GLENN: Yeah, it's -- oh, crap. I mean, excuse the pun. Yeah, what is it? Say it out loud.

(laughter)

JEFFY: Dysentery.

GLENN: Yeah, dysentery. Dysentery. Yep. Dysentery.

The American flag only has 45 stars. The population of Las Vegas was 30 people, one hundred years ago.

PAT: Thirty?

GLENN: Thirty.

Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea had not been invented yet. There was neither a Mother's Day nor a Father's Day.

Only 6 percent of all Americans graduated from high school. Marijuana, heroin, morphine, all available over-the-counter at local drugstores.

PAT: Good times. Good times. Good times.

(sighing)

GLENN: Back then, your local pharmacist would say, "Heroin will clean your complexion, and it gives you buoyance of the mind."

JEFFY: Fact.

GLENN: "It regulates the stomach. It regulates the bowels. In fact, heroin is the perfect guardian of health."

JEFFY: Fact.

PAT: Wow.

GLENN: Can you imagine? I would have never left my drugstore.

PAT: I know.

(laughter)

GLENN: Eighteen percent of households had at least one full-time servant or domestic help. And there were how many murders in the entire United States a hundred ago in America? For the entire year, one hundred years ago, 1916, how many murders?

JEFFY: Reported.

GLENN: Yeah, were reported.

STU: Murders usually are a crime that's reported accurately because there's dead people or missing people. That's why the crime stat people like --

PAT: Well, you're leading us to believe that it's really low.

GLENN: Why am I leading you to believe that? Oh, because I'm for Hillary?

PAT: Yes.

GLENN: Does that also lead you to believe I'm for Hillary?

PAT: Yes, yes.

STU: You are?

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: And gun control.

GLENN: And gun control.

PAT: Fifty.

GLENN: Shut up, Pat.

(chuckling)

PAT: That's too low? Is that too low?

STU: I bet it's right around, what, the area of just what Chicago gets in a year now. Probably the entire country.

GLENN: Entire country of the United States.

PAT: 700.

GLENN: 700. What do you think, Stu?

STU: Yeah, I mean --

GLENN: Chicago --

JEFFY: There were 30 people in Vegas. So 9,225.

GLENN: Thank you, Jeffy. Thank you for playing along. Thank you.

JEFFY: You're welcome. You're welcome.

GLENN: 230.

STU: Wow.

PAT: 230?

GLENN: In the entire country, a hundred years ago.

PAT: That's pretty good.

GLENN: Well, there were no guns. Oh, wait.

PAT: Hold it.

GLENN: Hold it just a second.

JEFFY: What?

PAT: They were probably more prevalent.

GLENN: No, they couldn't have been.

PAT: Per capita.

GLENN: No, I think you're wrong. Don't even look at it. Don't even look at that stat. Because then you're probably wrong. And let's just assume that you are. Okay?

STU: On this front too -- this is kind of interesting in that, you know, capitalism does its work a lot of times in spite of Washington. And a lot of times, we sit here thinking about how bad everything is, but capitalism churns away, while Washington tries to screw it up.

And it's our job to push for Washington to screw it up as little as possible. But as it's churned away over the past 90 years -- in the mid-30s -- last past 80 years, mid-30s, you spent about 62 percent of your disposable income on home, cars, clothing, household furnishings, household and utilities, and gasoline. So, I mean, you look at that, it's pretty much nothing you're like enjoying. It's just stuff you need. Basic necessities of life. Food. How do you get around? It was 62 percent in the mid-30s. It's now 32 percent.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh.

STU: So you cut that in half, giving us all the rest of that income to do things that we might enjoy or that aren't base necessities of --

GLENN: Why doesn't it feel that way?

JEFFY: It doesn't.

STU: Well, because I think --

PAT: Debt for one thing.

STU: The messaging of the media is that everyone is getting behind. And I think debt is part of it. But, you know, credit card debt is probably part of it.

GLENN: And we're probably spending a lot of money on the things that we don't need. And so that puts us behind. And then we look at -- if it wasn't for our house being so expensive -- because we wouldn't think about cutting --

STU: But the central function of that, I don't think is any of those things. I think it's capitalism improving things.

GLENN: Yes.

STU: It's cutting costs on items that we used to have. It's improving items that we used to have. It's making those things more efficiently produced. And now we're able to afford things -- I mean, you told the story about the 10,000-dollar television recently on the air about how one of your big purchases --

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: My 40th birthday, my wife got me a -- the first Sony flat screen -- I still have it. First Sony flat screen television. It was I don't even know, 32 inches. Pat, do you think, maybe?

PAT: Yeah, maybe a little bigger than that.

GLENN: And it was $10,000.

STU: And that was?

GLENN: Twelve years ago.

STU: Twelve years ago. So mid-Bush administration -- this is not ancient history, right?

I was in Walmart two weeks ago and took a picture of a television display. And it was a brand I hadn't heard of, so it wasn't Sony. But it was a 40-inch -- it was LCD. It was a smart TV. So it had features that your TV couldn't even dream of, right?

GLENN: I know.

STU: $198.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh!

JEFFY: Oh, yeah.

STU: $198.

PAT: Wow.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh.

STU: And there were just stacks of them. And it's like, how do you account for, to people, that change? Because people will say, well, look, if you look at the incomes, you know, after tax and after health care expenses, we haven't improved things at all for the middle class.

What about that change? The thing that only Mr. Rich Television Personality could even dream of affording -- and if I remember correctly, you opposed the purchase because it was too crazy.

GLENN: Yeah, no. I wouldn't have gotten it -- if it wasn't for my birthday --

STU: It was only a birthday present.

GLENN: She surprised me with it. And I thought it was insane. And it was so insane that I would bring you guys over. You guys came over to my house. And you said, "Can I come over and see it?"

STU: It was a museum piece. Okay?

GLENN: It was. And it was in my bedroom. I said, "Okay." And we would all sit on the bed and go, "Wow."

PAT: We traveled 2,000 miles to see it.

STU: Yeah. It was that amazing.

PAT: I was in Houston at the time.

GLENN: That's right. That's right.

PAT: Yeah.

STU: So this is actually -- I think back before even when you were on TV. But it was a time -- that changed.

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: So now a person who makes, you know, $30,000 a year and has a nice job and --

GLENN: Has a flat screen --

STU: Has a flat screen TV of better quality --

GLENN: For 198 -- yes.

STU: Even from some no-name brand, better quality with features that didn't even exist when you bought yours, in about a decade.

GLENN: For $198.

STU: Yeah, for 99 percent off. Or 98 percent off.

GLENN: Unbelievable.

STU: And that stuff happens all the time with products all the time.

GLENN: All the time.

STU: And it's lost because the media focuses on things that make capitalism look evil. Those things are happening to us all the time. And it's the -- it is the miracle of America.

Featured Image: Photograph of three women spinning wool to knit socks for soldiers during World War I, circa 1915. (Wiki Commons)

There are new curriculum standards being implemented into schools throughout the nation for health classes that not only go far beyond what's appropriate for young children, but are entrenched in clear political biases, too. Under the standards, third-graders are taught about hormone blockers and endless gender identities, and topics get shockingly graphic for kids as young as 11. Some schools are even teaching their teachers and kids to ignore what parents have to say about these topics. And the worst part may be that many parents are completely unaware what their children are being taught.

Tina Descovich, co-founder of Moms for Liberty, joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to explain exactly what you can ask at your next school board meeting to ensure this "horrifying" curriculum isn't being taught in your kid's school.

Watch the video clip below:

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It should come as no surprise that a newsworthy story receives more media coverage when released on a Monday than a Friday. The reason is in part due to a large number of news-consuming Americans checking out for the week to focus on their weekend plans rather than the news.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck shared information that President Joe Biden decided to release on Friday — when fewer people would notice — regarding the Climate Finance report. This report is marketed to Americans as "A Roadmap To Build a Climate-Resilient Economy." But Glenn believes the report to be Biden's Great Reset warning shot to banks.

In this clip, Glenn warned that if Americans don't stand together, in eight years we all indeed will own nothing. Watch the clip for the full story. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.



Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

On today's radio program, Glenn Beck was joined by Bill O'Reilly to discuss the top stories of the week.

For O'Reilly, the biggest story this week centered around someone mysteriously missing from mainstream media news reports today: Mark Zuckerberg. Specifically, O'Reilly said it's the 'scandalous' way the Facebook CEO spent nearly $420 million to influence the 2020 election — and did so successfully.

Watch the clip to hear the full conversation. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

On Thursday's radio program, Grace Smith and her father, Andy, joined Glenn Beck on the phone and provided a first-hand account of Grace's refusal to wear a mask at school.

Smith, 16, began a maskless protest after her school district in Laramie, Wyoming, decided to implement a mask mandate. As a result, Grace received three suspensions, was issued two $500-citations, and was eventually arrested.

"How long were you in jail?" Glenn asked.

Grace said was taken to jail but was never booked nor was she was placed in a jail cell.

Glenn commended Grace's father, Andy, for raising such a "great citizen" and asked if it was Grace's idea to protest. Andy said it was Grace's idea, explaining that they took the position of arguing on the grounds of civil rights rather than the efficacy of wearing a mask.

Grace has since withdrawn from public school and started a home school program. She also told Glenn that she will continue to fight the school district, legally.

You can donate to Grace's legal fund here.

To hear more from this conversation click here.

Disclaimer: The content of this clip does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID-19 and/or COVID vaccine related questions & concerns.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.