Haters Beware! The New Hate Speech Requires a Special Decoder

Do you treat people the same way, based on the content of their character? Well, stop it, because you're a hater.

"That indicates that you're not respecting their cultural differences, if you treat everyone the same. I mean, what an amazing journey from Martin Luther King and, you know, take people on the content of their character," Co-host Stu Burguiere said Friday on The Glenn Beck Program.

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But if you think you can comment about cultural differences, think again. That's hate speech, too.

What's the solution? Get your special decoder or sit down and shut up. Or, here's a whacky thought: Treat everyone as uniquely wonderful and respectfully exercise your First Amendment rights.

Read below or listen to the full segment for answers to these First Amendment-protected questions:

• What is hate speech?

• If a hater hates in the woods is it still hate?

• Why is it hateful to treat people the same?

• If your ancestors were white abolitionists, are you still white privileged?

• What country are you from? (Oops, that's hate speech, sorry)

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors:

PAT: I treat all people the same.

STU: That's called -- that's basically hate speech. You're not supposed to say that.

PAT: Yeah.

STU: Because that indicates -- we tried to figure some of these out. I don't even know. That indicates that you're not respecting their cultural differences, if you treat everyone the same. I mean, what a -- what an amazing journey from Martin Luther King and, you know, take people on the content of their character and not --

PAT: Where are you originally from? You can't ask somebody that. If they have a pronounced accent, you can't say, "Oh, hey, it's great to have you. Where you originally from?" No, that's offensive. Because you're making them feel like I guess they're other than American. Well, they are, right? They might be citizens now. But that's not where they originated. Is that -- how can that be wrong? I wouldn't care if someone said, "Where's your ancestry?" I would be okay telling them it's mostly Ireland. I'd be all right with that. That doesn't bother me.

STU: If someone asks you -- came up to you today and said, Pat, "Where are you originally from," you would say --

PAT: Montana.

STU: Montana. Right? There's an answer to that question. If it's a foreign country, fine. Or I would say New York. Jeffy would say hell.

PAT: Yeah, or south hell --

STU: Or Michigan. I know it was Michigan. Was it hell?

PAT: South hell?

STU: Southern hell.

PAT: Right.

JEFFY: That's fine.

STU: The point being, that's an honest question. It doesn't indicate any hatred toward --

PAT: Here's another thing you're not supposed to say: The same thing happens to me too.

JEFFY: Oh, boy.

STU: No. All of our experiences are different, Pat.

PAT: They're totally unique. That's never happened to anyone. All of my experiences are uniquely mine. I guess that's the issue there.

I know exactly how you feel.

STU: No, you don't. My experiences are my own!

PAT: Some of my best friends are white, black, Hispanic. None of those are acceptable.

STU: See that indicates that you're trying to excuse your own racial intolerance by just claiming you have non-descript friends of another race.

JEFFY: I don't see color. I'm colorblind.

STU: I mean, think about that. That is on the list. I'm colorblind. I don't see color.

PAT: Isn't that what Martin Luther King said?

STU: The plea of the biggest civil rights hero in the last 100 years is the thing you're not allowed to say at James Madison University.

PAT: You are so articulate.

STU: Now, that is obviously bad --

PAT: That is -- wow, you might as well have said the N-word.

(laughter)

STU: Now, again, that is not okay to say, unless you're Joe Biden, who said it about Barack Obama. Said, oh, he's the first articulate black candidate ever. It's a storybook, man. Clean.

PAT: Clean.

STU: Like he was shocked the man was clean.

PAT: Yeah.

STU: You're shocked a black man took a shower and the guy is vice president of the United States. But yet, freshmen at James Madison can't say it.

PAT: Here's one we tried to figure out the other day on Pat & Stu, saying to somebody who is in the LGBTQ community, what you do in the privacy of your own bedroom, that's your business.

JEFFY: Oh, my gosh.

PAT: Why is -- what? How?

STU: How is that hateful?

PAT: I don't know. Or offensive in any way.

STU: And I guess the -- to try formulate the outrage -- because this is the issue here. None of us are offended by this, and the audience isn't offended by these things because we don't wake up every day searching for life meaning in outrage. We don't sit here and say, "Oh, gosh, please, let me today discover something that will make me so upset, I can try to ruin somebody's business over it." That's not how we run our lives.

JEFFY: Right. But by saying that, you're saying that you disagree with what they do in their bedroom.

PAT: How? When you're saying, I don't care what you do.

JEFFY: Exactly.

STU: Exactly. You should care, and you should honor it and respect it.

PAT: Yes. Is that what I'm supposed -- I love what you do.

Hey, dude, I love what you do in your bedroom with your partner. I love that. That is awesome.

STU: And, of course, any --

PAT: May I participate?

STU: Yeah.

PAT: May I --

JEFFY: I don't think you have to go that far.

PAT: May I join the two of you? Because that seems like a great -- a really wonderful experience. Is that what it has to be now?

JEFFY: You have such a pretty face.

PAT: Oh, you can't say that either, Jeffy, as you know. Because you know, you can't say that --

STU: If you were gay and someone came up to you and said, "Hey, by the way, I really love what you guys are doing in your bedroom," wouldn't you be like -- that would be the weirdest thing in the world. Get out of my space, man.

(laughter)

JEFFY: Make you put the camera away. How do you know what I'm doing in my bedroom?

STU: Right. How do you know?

PAT: Why are you even talking about that?

STU: Why would you bring that up? That's so weird.

PAT: Now, some of these you can kind of figure out. You're not supposed to say to anybody, "I never owned slaves." Well, that's because it doesn't matter if you owned slaves or not. The problem universal, anyway, right? Isn't that what they're kind of saying with that one?

JEFFY: Yes.

PAT: That that's not the issue whether you specifically owned slaves or whether your ancestors did. The problem exists whether you were part of it or not. And by your whiteness, you are part of it because of white privilege.

And I think you're denying white privilege if you say something like this. Is that right?

JEFFY: Okay. Okay.

STU: I guess. I guess.

JEFFY: Okay.

STU: I do not have my decoder --

PAT: Holy cow. It's unbelievable.

Featured Image: No Hate Speech movement logo

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(Left) Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images/ (Right) Video screenshot

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Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

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Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

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