Voice Expert: Anyone Can Be a Great Singer or Speaker

Roger Love, one of the world's leading authorities on voice, joined The Glenn Beck Program on Monday to talk about his fascinating career coaching singers, actors and executives --- and turning them into great singers and public speakers. His new book Set Your Voice Free: How to Get the Singing or Speaking Voice You Want, distills the best of his teachings and exercises, used successfully for over 15 years.

"What I realized after about 17 years of just working with famous singers was that there was no difference between singing and speaking, and that I could take someone's speaking voice and add a musicality to it and have it sound incredible," Love said.

The goal is to move people emotionally with your voice --- and no one is better equipped to teach that than Roger Love.

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors:

GLENN: Welcome to the program, Roger Love. Author of the new book Set Your Voice Free. Roger, are you there?

ROGER: I am here, and happy to be here.

GLENN: Will you do me a favor and just tell me quickly the story -- I think it's of Walk the Line, where the two actors, Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon were really having a hard time and there were six weeks left, and they walked into your office. Can you talk about that at all?

ROGER: Absolutely. The story starts with neither of them knowing when they accepted the roles to star in Walk the Line, to play Johnny Cash and to play June Carter Cash, that they were actually going to have to sing, because neither of them think of themselves at that point in time as singers.

So I get the call from Reese. And the two of them have to record about 30 some odd parts of songs. And so I start working every day. And trying to make Joaquin sing like the iconic Johnny Cash is no easy feet.

GLENN: Right.

ROGER: But thank gosh he is an amazing actor. And the discipline that both of them had to go from working with me and starting as not really singers to doing an incredible job in the film, I look at that as being one of the greatest collaborations in my life, something that I'm very, very proud of. Because the result was that she won an Academy Award for a singing role. And he won multiple awards for a singing role. And where we started three or four weeks ago was not very much great singing.

GLENN: Seriously, it was three weeks working with you?

ROGER: Three weeks. About every day for a few hours.

GLENN: Holy cow.

ROGER: Believe me, I wish some of these pictures that I do like Crazy Hard -- I wish they would give me more time, but quite often, I'm thrown in at the last minute to say, "Hey, Rodge, can you make this person who is not really a singer sound incredible?"

GLENN: So let me ask you this question: Over the weekend, I sat down with one of my daughters, and I said, "Let's draw mountains together. Let's just draw, you know, some things. Let me show you a picture."

And she said, "Dad, I don't have any talent at all."

And I said, "Yeah, you can draw."

And she said, "No, I can't. The gene didn't pass to me."

And I said, "Yes, it did. We're not talking about genes. Just paint what you see." Or, "Just draw what you see."

So she drew. And it was very simple mountains. And it looked like a kid's drawing.

Then I went back and I said, "Honey, just draw with me now. See this part over here? See, it looks like this. And here's how you can do it."

Her painting or her, you know, oil thing.

ROGER: Masterpiece.

GLENN: Yeah, masterpiece. It went from third grade to 12th grade, just by seeing the technique. And I contend that 80 percent of, you know, an artist is just learning how to do it. That 20 percent is what makes you a star.

But everybody can pretty much do what they don't think they can do. Is it the same with singing or not?

ROGER: Yes. We think that we are born with a particular voice. Singing, speaking. All of a sudden if we're singing happy birthday and we sound better than everybody else and we get the first piece of cake, we think we're born with talent. Or if we have this nasal voice or really soft or aggravated, some kind of a weird voice, we think we're stuck with it because that's the sound that is coming out of the mouth. But I've spent my life showing people how simple it is to take what you like about your voice and what you don't like about your voice and add a little bit of technique and then sound like however you want.

So even a singer who is born with an amazing ability that Mother Nature gave them, if they don't work on their voice -- if they don't decide, "I want to sing. I love to sing," then they never become great.

And those people that were maybe born with a little less from Mother Nature, if they work a little harder and have that technique, they can ofttimes end up sounding better than the people that were born with a gift.

GLENN: Okay. So let me take it one more step. We were talking about millennials and how nobody is learning how to talk to each other.

ROGER: Right.

GLENN: Everything is virtual. Certainly, nobody is learning how to stand up in front of a crowd and speak.

Your book talks about that as well. What's the difference?

ROGER: The difference is -- and this is crazy. Can you imagine in the world that we're living right now that the number one fear in America is still speaking in public?

What an amazing world we must live in, if everyone is the most worried about speaking in public.

And what I realized after about 17 years of just working with famous singers was that there was no difference between singing and speaking, and that I could take someone's speaking voice and add a musicality to it and have it sound incredible.

And those sounds would move people emotionally when they heard someone speak. And once -- once you have those kinds of sounds come out of your mouth and you realize you have influence over people, that when you open your mouth, it's like you're singing someone's favorite song and all you're doing is speaking. You lose a lot of stage fright. You lose a lot of fear of speaking in public.

GLENN: You start to like it.

SIMON: Because you end up liking the sound of your own voice and you can't wait to show it off.

GLENN: I know that my son had to speak in church, so I worked with him on his talk. And I had him go find a joke that he wanted to tell at the beginning. You know, some sort of deal. And I worked with him on the joke. We practiced and practiced and practiced. And I knew, the minute he got that instant reaction that was positive back -- if he could just do that one thing right and really pull that off, he would like to speak.

He is terrified of speaking. Now, I could put him anywhere, and he would get up and start talking.

ROGER: So I love that story. If I go to a restaurant or you go to a restaurant and you don't think you're funny and you tell a joke and everyone laughs, then the next time you're having dinner the following week at a restaurant, maybe you'll bring out that same joke, maybe another one.

And if they laugh, by the next time you're at a restaurant, you think that you're the funniest person at the table, so you can't wait to be funny because you see how people react to you. And that's what I help people do just with speaking, to create sounds that people react to positively so that you can't wait to communicate, whether you're speaking to one person or whether you're speaking to 1,000 people.

GLENN: Okay. I have to be honest with the audience: The reason why Roger is on is because I believe in his work so much because I am a client of Roger's. He has brought me to a place to where, you know, I was in -- what the doctors would say is full vocal cord paralysis. And he has brought me out of that and helped me retain my voice. You have brought me from not being able to say a word, to being able to speak with my regular voice within 20 minutes.

And everybody I tell say, "That's not possible."

ROGER: Well, that is a joy that I could be a part of that and be a part of your family. So thank you for that opportunity.

The thing is that for years, I've been saying that the sounds you make are either making you healthy and happy, or they're making you unhealthy and unhappy.

GLENN: So how do you teach this in a book, Roger?

ROGER: Because it's not just a book. It's a book that goes along with a website that has 75 audio samples. And everything that I talk about in the book, you -- you also have me making the sounds, and then you're singing along with me and speaking along with me.

GLENN: So what you did for me -- and you made those little tapes for me, you've just used me as a guinea pig for your book.

(chuckling)

GLENN: So it's basically the same thing that you've done for me.

ROGER: Exactly right. The same thing that I've done for you and for singers like --

GLENN: Elton John.

ROGER: -- John Mayer and Selena Gomez this past year. And any -- and speakers like Anthony Robbins and Suze Orman, anyone that is having an issue with their voice and that I've realized that I could help them with a little bit technique that would make their voice healthy and then make it a lot more fun to use and a lot more fun to listen to.

GLENN: Okay. So I tried to explain what you do to a friend of mine who came up for Christmas. His name is David Osmond. I'm sure you recognize the name.

ROGER: Absolutely.

GLENN: Is David on the phone? Is David on the phone?

DAVID: Can you hear me?

GLENN: Yeah, David. Are you there?

DAVID: I'm here. Can you hear me?

GLENN: Yeah, can. David, meet Roger. Roger, meet David.

ROGER: Good morning, David.

DAVID: The man, the legend, the myth, Roger. What's up, buddy?

GLENN: So I asked David to come on because I could not explain to him what you do. David, explain your situation.

DAVID: Well, I've been performing my entire life, singing from so many different walks of life, as far as music goes, and continuing to do that. And now that I'm hosting TV shows and have a new big band going, music and voice is constant. And I noticed something was up this last fall. I could just feel something in my voice because I'm so connected to it.

And I approached my Uncle Donnie, who had some vocal challenges over the last couple years. He said, "Hey, check out this guy. Maybe you should just go get it looked at and see what's going on."

Sure enough, found on the left side of my vocal fold, this sizeable polyp that is just right on the underside and had vocal surgery to get that removed after different assessments and figuring out what I needed to do.

So I literally, about a month ago had vocal surgery to get that removed. And it is -- it is scary having to go down there and have this surgery procedure done, knowing that this -- this is my lifeblood. This is what I do.

STU: And they didn't know for sure if you would ever be able to sing again.

So I said to him, "You've got to talk to Roger Love." Not for a -- you know, not for physical stuff, but to -- to -- he -- I don't know how you do it, Roger, but you can hear it in somebody's voice when they sing.

DAVID: Well, first, let's tell the audience -- and I honestly, just talking again this week, this last week because I was silent for the last month. Just complete vocal rest.

GLENN: Right.

ROGER: Man, thank you for sharing that. Let me tell the listeners that -- so that they understand a little bit of what that is.

If you're a guitar player and you're always playing the guitar and you're rubbing your fingers against the springs --

DAVID: Hello?

GLENN: Hang on, David. Go ahead, Roger.

ROGER: What happens, if you're a guitar player and you're rubbing your fingers against the strings and you play a lot, you basically start to develop like callouses on your fingers so that the body thinks it's protecting you so that it doesn't rub off your fingers and you don't you don't get all bloody --

DAVID: I can't hear.

ROGER: So it's normal for guitar players. But what most people don't understand is, this happens all the time to singers. And if you're singing a lot or if you're doing any kind of straining or you're singing hard songs, or even if you're speaking in a way that creates a little bit of pressure on the vocal cords, the body can create these little lesions, these little growths on the vocal cords, thinking it's protecting you.

GLENN: It's actually destroying the voice.

Roger, I got to take a quick break. See if we can fix this technically because he can't hear you. But I had to put you two together because David is -- I just think David is remarkable and a really nice guy. You are remarkable and a really nice guy. I had to get you two together. If you want to learn from the guy who literally everybody who is anybody has worked with, how to speak, how to sing, his name is Roger Love. He's got a new book out called Set Your Voice Free. How to get the singing or speaking voice that you want. I work with him and have for years. He is truly remarkable. Roger Love, Set Your Voice Free, available everywhere now. Back in a minute.

First, have you noticed -- have you noticed what officials are saying? Officials are saying, "Gee, now, looks like rate hikes are going to come." Looks like maybe we're going to have stop all this printing.

Oh. Oh, okay. That was the headline in the Wall Street Journal over the weekend. Rate rises more of them coming. Officials suggest in 2017, they could see three more interest rate increases. This comes after the fed has already raised it once. This is the first time they've done it in a long time. Things could go unstable.

This is uncharted territory, unless you look to history. And every time in history this has happened, it hasn't gone well. Maybe this time is different.

I have a hard time with that. I'd like to look at history to see -- at least be able to gauge the percentages of being able to survive what you're currently doing. Has anybody else survived before? The answer to that is no.

Are you prepared for whatever may come your way is this call Goldline now. And look at your portfolio. In your IRA, maybe you can take 10 percent of your IRA and transfer that to gold. Physical gold that you can hold in your own hand. Call 866GOLDLINE. 866GOLDLINE or goldline.com.

[break]

GLENN: I blew it. I broke -- yeah.

Oh, hello. Welcome to the program. Sorry.

Got busy. I couldn't get the phones to work the way they were supposed to work. My apologies to David and Roger. But now they're on the phone with each other, and they're actually going to talk to each other. That's the important thing. The name of the book is Set Your Voice Free by Roger Love. And, you know, I sat there with David Osmond. And he just looked at me and, you know, just quietly said, "Scary. It's really scary to think I'll never sing again." You know, and he has MS and has been -- he has had a really, really tough year.

So his MS flares up. He gets a polyp on his vocal cords. He's got a new wife and family.

You know, it's not -- I mean, they're busting -- he's busting his butt to make ends meet.

PAT: He's got a new wife? He traded in the old one?

GLENN: Yeah. He traded -- yeah, yeah. She was getting some high miles on her.

No. She -- you know, but it's a young -- you know, they've been married, what? Seven years or so.

PAT: Yeah. Yeah.

GLENN: Yesterday, can you believe this, 17th anniversary for my wife and I.

STU: Wow.

PAT: Congratulations.

GLENN: Seventeen years has gone by so fast.

That's crazy.

JEFFY: It has gone by fast.

STU: I mean, that would have been a bet to take, she was going to stick around this long. I mean, what are the odds you'd got out of that? 2030 to one? You would have been very wealthy.

GLENN: Yeah, very wealthy. Very wealthy.

What about the next 25 years? Or next 20 years?

STU: I'd still take it.

GLENN: You'd still take it.

At some point -- at some point, she's got to -- you're saying, she's got to pull the chute.

STU: I think even Goldline would say even that's a better investment than --

GLENN: Yeah. Thank you for that, Stu.

STU: You're welcome.

GLENN: Thank you.

So let me go back to the millennial conversation that we were having, and that is millennials are walking into their job -- many of them with very low self-esteem. And safe zones. And never been challenged. And told they'll never be hurt. All lies. All of those things lies. Thinking that it's just going to be easy. You get the trophy. They're walking in with low self-esteem because they got the trophy and they know they didn't deserve the trophy.

You're not so special. You know, billion of people alive today. More tomorrow. And have come before you that were pretty special. You? No. It's what you do that is going to make you special, make you stand out.

Let's go to Josh in Indiana. Go ahead, Josh.

CALLER: Hey, thanks for taking my call.

GLENN: You bet. You're a millennial?

CALLER: Yeah, I'm 24 years old.

GLENN: Okay.

CALLER: So thanks for taking my call.

You know, I was to a certain degree coddled and didn't really know it at the time, and, you know, my parents were doing their best. But, you know, I think a lot of it was just afraid of real life. So it started off that they -- I'm sober three, almost four years now. So I did drugs. Failed out of college. Moved back home. Did the whole millennial thing.

PAT: Wow.

CALLER: But I finally looked up. And I'm a long-time listener of your program. And I had to learn a lot of lessons the hard way, but I think what, you know, millennials need is we need strong American values.

PAT: Hang on a second.

GLENN: Hold on, Josh. Hold on because I want to delve into your story a little bit more. Back in a minute.

(OUT AT 9:31AM) the

GLENN: Let's go back to Indiana and Josh who is a millennial. You're how old, 25, Josh?

CALLER: Hey, still here.

GLENN: Yeah, are you 25?

CALLER: Twenty-four.

GLENN: Twenty-four.

And you were raised like pretty much everybody else was raised. You know, you're special, and here's your trophy and everything else.

And then you said that caused a breakdown and you started into alcohol and drugs.

CALLER: Well, the thing about it is, you know, I was listening to you guys. A lot of the generation, the millennials, we are looking for our why and our purpose. And, you know, high school, that's not real life. And college, you know, that's also not real life. So it took me a lot of time to sort out what's reality and what's not reality.

GLENN: What do you mean by that? That it's not real life.

CALLER: Well, you know, in high school, it's a whole different system. And in college, it's a whole different system. And you get out in the real world and you start paying bills and you can't necessarily stay up till 2:00 a.m. on the weekends and party and live that kind of lifestyle. And so for me, I got into drugs and alcohol at a young age. Do that. And it really took -- go ahead.

GLENN: So then what turned you around? Because we were talking about this, that I don't believe that -- and this is a real -- a broad generation. Of course, there will be exceptions to every rule.

But generally speaking, people don't make a change in their life until there's a problem. And, you know, the millennials are walking into the world with the lowest self-esteem of any generation ever. And it's because they realize we're kind of a fraud. We didn't actually earn these trophies. We didn't really have to work for it. And so they are looking for something meaningful in their life.

What was the -- what was the turning point for you? And how did you grab a hold of your life?

CALLER: Sure, yeah. For me, it was hitting rock bottom. Getting kicked out of my parents' house and having to make it on my own. But it's tough love. That's what Americans need to provide for the millennials, whether it's the parents or the corporations. You know, it's a good shakedown. And for me, I had to fall back on good values, American values from my parents, that they tried to teach me. But I had to basically reject a lot of -- a lot of the stuff you hear in college and a lot of the stuff you hear in high school.

PAT: So your parents finally said, "Okay. You've been here long enough. You need to go."

CALLER: Yeah.

PAT: And where did you go?

CALLER: Well, I moved out into a halfway house myself.

PAT: Did you really?

CALLER: Yeah. Had to stay sober, go to AA meetings, get a job at Waffle House.

PAT: Wow. Wow.

CALLER: Get a job at Wendy's. Pay my own bills.

PAT: Wow.

STU: That's a lot of living for 24 years old.

GLENN: Good for you.

PAT: Yeah, you've been through some stuff.

GLENN: Good for you. Good for you.

PAT: So are you making it now? Are you doing well?

CALLER: I am. I'm in school full-time. I hold a full-time job myself. Self-employed. And looking to get my degree here and get a job in the health care career.

PAT: Good for you.

GLENN: Good luck with that.

What is -- how is your self-esteem?

CALLER: You know, I -- I had to find my own purpose. It's a lot better now, you know, now that I'm sober and not have cloudy judgment anymore. But I think it's just going to take some time for a lot of millennials to find their self-worth and to make it on their own. And definitely don't need to be coddled by anybody. A good shakeup is really what's needed.

PAT: That's great.

GLENN: Please check in with us again. I'd love to hear how you continue to do. Thanks so much, Josh.

CALLER: Sure thing. Thanks for having me.

PAT: Halfway house, man, that's tough.

STU: Yeah, that's tough love. That's real

GLENN: And the no offices and all of that.

STU: Oh, God.

JEFFY: Oh, God.

STU: We know you are willing to do the no offices. We are aware of this fact. We work with you. We got it.

GLENN: So I'm willing to do that. But I'm not willing to coddle -- I'm not as a company willing to coddle.

STU: No.

GLENN: We'll change with the times. I like that atmosphere much better as a creative atmosphere.

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: However, you still have to do it.

PAT: Right.

GLENN: You don't do it --

PAT: You can't -- you can't stay. Right?

GLENN: No, you can't stay. You hurt everybody else.

PAT: Right. Yeah.

STU: If you get upset, will you be able to maybe shut down for the day?

GLENN: No, you're pretty much -- get over it.

STU: There's some interesting --

PAT: And you treat everybody else like crap because you're having a bad day? Is that right?

GLENN: No, you're pretty much, get out. And leave the bean bag chair here.

STU: Let me give you a couple of examples.

How is the left dealing with the current environment?

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: This is difficult. And these aren't all millennials. Look at this. It's amazing to see this. And it's so easy to mock. But maybe there's something different here.

GLENN: Your first instinct was to mock?

STU: My first instinct was to mock. But I'm trying to be good here.

Eric Holthaus (phonetic), this is his Tweet storm from this weekend: I'm starting my 11th year working on climate change, including the last four in daily journalism.

Today, I went to see a counselor about it.

PAT: Oh, wow.

STU: I'm saying this because I know many people feel deep despair about climate, especially post election. I struggle every day. You are not alone.

PAT: How much did you struggle over the weekend when it was 11 degrees in Dallas, Texas?

STU: Really freaking cold.

PAT: It was so warm, it had got cold.

GLENN: Now, Pat's first instinct was to mock.

STU: Right.

GLENN: And I'm not saying that's not necessarily a healthy instinct.

PAT: I'm not ignoring that instinct right now.

GLENN: Right.

STU: All of these I want to mock and react viscerally to. I will admit.

GLENN: May I say my fifth instinct is to say you would feel that way had you been living in the last eight years in that bubble of, it's always going to be this way, our side won. Shut up everybody who disagrees with us.

STU: Right. The other party is a regional party that will never win another national election.

GLENN: Correct. And now you're feeling like we felt. So I can relate to you.

STU: So let me give you -- so this is one way of handling it. He says, "There are days when I literally can't work. I'll read a story and shut down for the rest of the day."

PAT: I mean, come on.

JEFFY: Come on.

PAT: How often do we read stories that piss us off, that offend us? Every day, all day.

GLENN: Okay. Let me ask you this. We're sitting here today. What is it? January 6th, 8th? Ninth?

JEFFY: Ninth. National championship day.

GLENN: January 9th.

PAT: That's a good point.

GLENN: We're sitting here January 9th, and we are just a few days away from the Hillary Clinton nomination.

PAT: January 9th. You mean -- like if she won.

GLENN: If she won --

PAT: Yeah.

GLENN: I bet you there would be a lot of people in our audience who would be like, "I can't function."

STU: I think that's true.

GLENN: I do. Look how we were in '12.

STU: They wouldn't go see a counselor.

PAT: We survived Obama twice. Nobody shuts down. I mean, nobody just stays home.

JEFFY: Right.

STU: Right. Republicans --

JEFFY: Barely go to work.

STU: Republicans -- conservatives deal with these problems in different ways.

GLENN: I agree.

STU: The liberal way to handle it is you go and you shut down and you see a counselor about it. That's not how a conservative is going to handle it.

PAT: Yes.

GLENN: I think there are a lot of conservatives, including me, that after Romney in '12, I was like, "I don't know this country. I don't want to look at the news."

STU: Yeah.

PAT: Sure.

JEFFY: But we did come into work every day.

GLENN: We forced ourselves to do it. But there was a lot of people who said, "I unplug. I'm out. I'm out." Now, that's not the same as shutting down and not being able to work, but honestly --

PAT: Not paying attention to the news for a while though. That's different than --

GLENN: But honestly, you work as a climate change activist. That's what you're doing every day. I can see you saying, "Well, why am I doing this?"

PAT: That's a stupid job to begin with. That's a dumb job to begin with.

GLENN: Okay. All right. That's bringing people together. That's good. Like it. Like it. Okay.

JEFFY: He knows it's dumb.

STU: He goes on to say, we don't deserve this planet. There are many days when I think it would be better off without us. And then he says, cue climate denier trolls, which I think is us.

PAT: Climate denier trolls. It's definitely me. Yeah.

GLENN: I don't think the world would be better off without humans.

PAT: It's just so insane.

STU: Yeah, and it goes -- it's a fairly lengthy thing. But, "I don't feel like I make a difference," which is what you were talking about with millennials.

GLENN: And what we felt like. Nobody is listening to me. I can't make a difference.

STU: You feel powerless. You feel like nothing matters. Your relationships suffer. You feel guilty for not doing more, but what the hell am I supposed to do? Write another blog post?

Our Secretary of State is the F-ing Exxon CEO.

Now, as funny as that is to mock, think of how we felt when people like Jeremiah Wright were associating with Barack Obama and they won somehow, and the country embraced that regime.

GLENN: Yes. Yes. Yes.

STU: And you had this guy who was saying, "We need to cling to our God and our guns as president of the United States."

GLENN: How many times did I say seriously, "I'm going to the mountains. What we're doing is not making a damn bit of difference. I'm going to the mountains." There's nothing different from what he's saying, except it's the other side and so we can laugh.

STU: Right.

GLENN: Which we shouldn't do. Because it's the other side.

Pat's like, I know we shouldn't, but I'm going to.

PAT: Exactly.

GLENN: So we may spend the last hour just mocking that guy.

(laughter)

STU: There's two other approaches too that we should get to as well.

GLENN: All right. Hang on just a second. Let me -- I want to read a -- I got a Christmas card from somebody. And I -- this is just the nicest -- this is just the nicest thing.

Dear Glenn, I can't believe it's the end of another year. For SimpliSafe, this year has brought continued growth, both from our loyal customers and our headquarters here in Boston. Eight years ago this month, we sold our first three SimpliSafe systems. I remember taking those orders myself, programming those systems, packing and shipping those first three orders myself. Today, I'm proud to say that this Black Friday, we sold 20,000 systems. It took 200 full-time UPS trucks to deliver those systems

PAT: In one day.

GLENN: Over 200 people on the phones to keep up with all of the orders.

As I watched the UPS trucks leaving our warehouses and walked the call center floor, I was reminded that we wouldn't be here without you and your audience.

As a thank you for your continued partnership, we made a donorship in your honor to Operation Underground Railroad.

Wishing you peace, success, continued joy. Blah, blah.

PS, I thought you might appreciate holding on to a little piece of our shared history. Enclosed is the first fully functioning camera prototype. You helped us build it. Thanks again.

STU: Oh, wow.

GLENN: So they sent me this prototype of their security camera that is now out.

I remember them bringing this to my office years ago and saying, "This is what we're working on. We're going to change the way home security is done." And I remember saying, "So what are you -- no wires. Everything is Bluetooth. Everything, you'll be able to do yourself and then explaining the vision to me and thinking, "This is fantastic."

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(OUT AT 9:49AM)

GLENN: Let me go to Rebecca in Ohio. Hello, Rebecca, you're on the Glenn Beck Program.

CALLER: Hey, Glenn.

GLENN: How are you?

CALLER: Good. How are you?

GLENN: Very good.

CALLER: So I wanted to call in because actually the interview that you had been sharing, I had actually seen a few days ago. And not only am I a millennial. I'm 25 years old. But I'm also a senior photographer. And I think many of the issues that you guys covered today, I guess I didn't notice them until it was brought to my attention.

Over the last few years, I've been doing senior photographer. And it seems like year after year, the communication during the sessions, when I'm trying to talk with my client, has become less and less.

And so when I'm, you know, photographing them, I'm trying to get to know them, they kind of stare down at their feet. They don't know what to say. They're becoming more awkward.

And at first, I thought, maybe it was just me. Maybe, you know, I'm not catering to them in a certain way.

But then afterwards, they would contact me on social media and go, "Oh, my gosh, I loved my session. And they would write these amazing reviews."

And I'm thinking, "Oh, my gosh, well, I thought that went horrible," but I guess that they find their confidence in the technology, and they find themselves expressing themselves better through technology and social media, more than even in person. Like, I can rarely get eye contact.

JEFFY: Oh, yeah.

GLENN: Wow, that's disturbing.

PAT: Interesting. And, yeah.

GLENN: Yeah, disturbing.

CALLER: Yeah, and it's gotten worse.

Like, you know, I started in 2010. And it seems like this year has been the worst.

Now, I love them to death. They're all very sweet. They're actually a lot better than the teenagers that I grew up with, when we were their age.

They aren't caddy anymore. They're not so critical. They're actually very loving, and they're very understanding and stuff. But it seems like, you know -- like you guys had been saying, they get their confidence through social media. And it seems like maybe they can express themselves better that way.

GLENN: Well, it's a safe zone.

CALLER: Yeah, absolutely.

GLENN: They know they won't encounter any kind of pushback, and they don't know how to say the things to people's faces.

JEFFY: Yeah, they haven't developed that at all.

GLENN: None. There's --

PAT: So when they get the pushback, they don't want to hear that. And that's why they're developing safe zones in colleges and all of that.

JEFFY: Right.

GLENN: But that's being empowered. I think they would take it if the adults in the classroom would say, "Sorry, dude, that's the way it is. Now, fight back. Come on. Deal with it. Show me the other side."

PAT: That's the way it is. That's life. Right. Deal with it.

CALLER: Yeah, you're not making it okay anymore to be wrong and to listen and to be understanding. It's like that's an embarrassment and that's awkward. It's like you have to be perfect in all aspects. And that's why on social media, they can delete that picture. They can, you know, backspace on their message before they send or post or anything like that.

GLENN: Yep.

PAT: Uh-huh.

GLENN: You know, it's amazing, I got a picture book from my daughter, who has my two grandchildren, for Christmas.

CALLER: Aw.

GLENN: And I looked at all the pictures, and they were beautiful. It was perfect. Then I went back and looked at some of the pictures, you know, from our family.

PAT: Uh-huh.

GLENN: Very few of them are perfect.

JEFFY: Oh, yeah. No way.

GLENN: I mean, they're usually somebody looking very dorky in the picture. That's real life. You know, that is what we are failing to teach is, there isn't a PhotoShop for life.

I think we can all agree, both on the Left and the Right, that children who have been caught up in illegal immigration is an awful situation. But apparently what no one can agree on is when it matters to them. This past weekend, it suddenly — and even a little magically — began to matter to the Left. Seemingly out of nowhere, they all collectively realized this was a problem and all rushed to blame the Trump administration.

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Here's Rachel Maddow yesterday:

I seem to remember getting mocked by the Left for showing emotion on TV, but I'll give her a pass here. This is an emotional situation. But this is what I can't give her a pass on: where the heck was this outrage and emotion back in 2014? Because the same situation going on today — that stuff Maddow and the rest of the Left have only just now woken up to — was going on back in July 2014! And it was arguably worse back then.

I practically begged and pleaded for people to wake up to what was going on. We had to shed light on how our immigration system was being manipulated by people breaking our laws, and they were using kids as pawns to get it done. But unlike the gusto the Left is using now to report this story, let's take a look at what Rachel Maddow thought was more important back in 2014.

On July 1, 2014, Maddow opened her show with a riveting monologue on how President Obama was hosting a World Cup viewing party. That's hard-hitting stuff right there.

On July 2, 2014, Maddow actually acknowledged kids were at the border, but she referenced Health and Human Services only briefly and completely rushed through what was actually happening to these kids. She made a vague statement about a "policy" stating where kids were being taken after their arrival. She also blamed Congress for not acting.

See any difference in reporting there from today? That "policy" she referenced has suddenly become Trump's "new" policy, and it isn't Congress's fault… it's all on the President.

She goes on throughout the week.

On July 7, 2014, her top story was something on the Koch brothers. Immigration was only briefly mentioned at the end of the show. This trend continued all the way through the week. I went to the border on July 19. Did she cover it? Nope. In fact, she didn't mention kids at the border for the rest of the month. NOT AT ALL.

Do you care about immigrant kids who have been caught in the middle of a broken immigration system or not?

Make up your minds. Is this an important issue or not? Do you care about immigrant kids who have been caught in the middle of a broken immigration system or not? Do you even care to fix it, or is this what it looks like — just another phony, addicted-to-outrage political stunt?

UPDATE: Here's how this discussion went on radio. Watch the video below.

Glenn gives Rachel Maddow the benefit of the doubt

Rachel Maddow broke down in tears live on her MSNBC show over border crisis.

Progressives think the Obamas are a gift to the world. But their gift is apparently more of the metaphorical kind. It doesn't extend to helpful, tangible things like saving taxpayers money. Illinois has approved $224 million to pay for street and transportation upgrades around the planned site of the Obama Presidential Center. The catch is that Illinois taxpayers will have to cover $200 million of that cost. For a presidential museum.

Eight years of multiplying the national debt wasn't enough for Barack Obama. Old fleecing habits die hard. What's another $200 million here and there, especially for something as important as an Obama tribute center?

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That's all well and good except Illinois can't even fund its pension system. The state has a $137 billion funding shortfall. That means every person in Illinois owes $11,000 for pensions, and there is no plan to fix the mess. Unless Illinois progressives have discovered a new kind of math, this doesn't really add up. You can't fund pensions, but you're going to figure out a way to milk the public for another $200 million to help cover the cost of a library?

It's hard to imagine who in their right mind would think this will be money well spent. Well, except for maybe Chicago Mayor and former Obama Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel who said, "The state's… investment in infrastructure improvements near the Obama Center on the South Side of Chicago is money well spent."

Some presidential overreach lasts longer than others.

The spending has already been signed into law, even though the Obama library has not received construction approval yet. Part of the holdup is that the proposed site is on public land in historic Jackson Park. That doesn't seem very progressive of the Obamas, but, you know, for certain presidents, you go above and beyond. It's just what you do. Some presidential overreach lasts longer than others.

Here's the thing about taxing the peasants so the king can build a fancy monument to himself – it's wrong. And completely unnecessary. The Obamas have the richest friends on the planet who could fund this project in their sleep. If the world simply must have a tricked-out Obama museum, then let private citizens take out their wallets voluntarily.

As the Mercury Museum proved this weekend, it is possible to build an exhibit with amazing artifacts that attracts a ton of visitors – and it cost taxpayers approximately zero dollars.

'The fool builds walls': China blasts Trump over tariffs

NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images

I can picture it now: Thousands of years ago, Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China, standing before hordes of his followers, in the Qin Dynasty, with a bright red bamboo hat on, and chanting, "Build that wall!"

It took a couple centuries to build the thing, but it got built. And it has been carefully maintained over the last 2,000 years, but, today, the Great Wall of China is so massive that astronauts can see it during good weather conditions from the lower part of low Earth orbit. The wall boasts over 3,000 miles of towers and brick embankments, with over 1,200 miles of natural defensive barriers. It's worth mentioning that the Chinese government is also exceptionally good at imposing digital walls, so much so that China ranks worst in the world for internet freedom.

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So it's a little strange to hear an editorial run by a major news network in China criticized President Trump for his proposal to build a large wall along the southern border of America.

"Following the path of expanding and opening up is China's best response to the trade dispute between China and the United States, and is also the responsibility that major countries should have to the world," the author wrote. "The wise man builds bridges, the fool builds walls."

Similarly, the Pope told reporters in 2016, "A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian. This is not the gospel."

Don't throw stones at people who want to build walls when you live in place surrounded by walls.

If you've been to the Vatican, you know that it is surrounded by enormous walls. The same goes for all the celebrities who live in heavily walled compounds—a safety measure—but who have also vehemently criticized President Trump's plans to build a wall.

You know the adage: "People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones at other people's glass houses." Perhaps the phrase needs an update: Don't throw stones at people who want to build walls when you live in place surrounded by walls.

An immaculate Nazi doctor hovers over newborn. He probes and sneers at it. "Take it away," he says. This is the very real process that Nazi doctors undertook during the era of Nazi Germany: Nazi eugenics, the studious, sterile search to find children who would define a pure breed for the German lineage. The Übermensch.

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During a speech to a delegation of Italy's Family Association in Rome on Saturday, Pope Francis referred to this cruel Nazi practice, which he used as a comparison to the increasingly popular process throughout Europe of "ending" birth defects, by offering abortions to women who have babies with chromosomal defects.

Here are two passages from the Pope's remarks:

I have heard that it's fashionable, or at least usual, that when in the first months of pregnancy they do studies to see if the child is healthy or has something, the first offer is: let's send it away.

And:

I say this with pain. In the last century the whole world was scandalized about what the Nazis did to purify the race. Today we do the same, but now with white gloves.

When CNN got the quote, and it shocked them so much that they had to verify the quote with the Vatican—in other words, it didn't fit the usual narrative.

It didn't fit the usual narrative.

The Pope also addressed claims that he has dedicated himself to LGBTQ causes:

Today, it is hard to say this, we speak of "diversified" families: different types of families. It is true that the word "family" is an analogical word, because we speak of the "family" of stars, family" of trees, "family" of animals ... it is an analogical word. But the human family in the image of God, man and woman, is the only one. It is the only one. A man and woman can be non-believers: but if they love each other and unite in marriage, they are in the image of God even if they don't believe.

The media have largely seen Pope Francis as the cool Pope, as the Obama of Catholicism. It'll be interesting to see how abruptly and severely that perspective changes.