History of Texas Part I: Six Flags Over Texas

Six Flags Over Texas is recognized as one of the most popular theme park companies in the United States. But the name represents more than just thrills and rides. The six flags are from the sovereign nations that once few their flags over Texas: Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederacy, and the United States.

When most people think about the history of Texas, they start with the Alamo in San Antonio --- but Texas history began hundreds of years prior to that pivotal event. It began when Spanish explorer Cabeza de Vaca washed up on the shores of what is now Galveston Island in 1528.

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GLENN: Six Flags over Texas is the name of one of the most popular theme park companies in the country. Its name is derived from the flags of the various sovereign nations whose flags at one time flown over Texas. The nations are Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederacy, and the United States.

When most people think of the history of Texas, they only really think of the Alamo. But Texas history began hundreds of years prior to that pivotal event in San Antonio.

Spaniard Cabeza de Vaca had been exploring north Florida with about 300 men, his expedition badly battered by hurricanes and attacks from Indians.

And with his numbers depleted, de Vaca and his men built makeshift boats and rafts to replace the ship they had lost in storms, out of trees that grew near what now would be called Tampa. Then they set sail again. The intent was to link up with their countrymen in Mexico. But along the way, they encountered more hurricanes.

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GLENN: The explorers washed up on the shore of what is now Galveston Island, Texas, 1528.

De Vaca and his men were the first white men to set foot in what would become the Lone Star State. Hit with so many devastating hurricanes in such a short time, de Vaca must have been thinking, "In 500 years or so, someone would have to do something about these frequent, intense global warming-caused weather events. Don't you think?"

There were only about 80 people that survived with de Vaca. And by the time he discovered Texas, the group was starving, diseased and had no water to drink. Initially, he was welcomed to the state with a typical Texas hospitality by the natives. Their hospitality wore thin as the Indians began to catch the diseases the visitors brought with them, and they began to die in large numbers. By the time de Vaca left. Texas on foot to find his fellow Spaniards in Mexico, only three of his men had survived that had made the journey with him. Soon after, Spanish explorer Coronado followed in search for gold, claiming this region for Spain.

By now, the French were interested in it as well, and they arrived in 1687. Even though Spain was in full control of and colonizing Mexico, it mostly abandoned Texas for about a century and a half. Perhaps due to the lack of air-conditioning in the hot, humid region, when the Spanish realized that the French had attempted unsuccessfully to colonize part of Texas, they renewed their interest in the area, and that was the year 1690.

This went on with a lot of sweat and toil and stinky people, until about 1820, when a wealthy American businessman, Moses Austin, originally from Virginia, now living in Missouri, he had recently lost his mining fortune. And he used the Spanish citizenship he acquired while mining in Spanish Louisiana and petitioned the Spanish government for permission to colonize Texas with 300 American families. Permission was granted. However, before he could make the journey, Moses Austin contracted pneumonia and died. So the task fell to his son, who was not necessarily really interested in the undertaking of, "Hey, let's go to a place even more hot and humid than Louisiana." But he agreed to take it on since it was his father's last wish.

Stephen F. Austin eventually fell in love with the land and his father's vision. From father's of Texas...

VOICE: I've been accused of having magnificent schemes for Texas, and I confess that I have them. It is depopulated. I wish to people it. The population that is there is backward. I wish it to be advanced by the introduction of industrious farmers and liberal Republicans. I want the savage Indians subdued, the frontier protected, the lands cultivated. I wish to take from my native land and from every other country the best that they have and transplant it in my adoptive land. Stephen F. Austin.

GLENN: Stephen F. Austin was only 24 years old when he took upon himself this monumental task. When Austin reached Texas, it was 1821. And the Spanish had been overthrown. The territory was now Mexico. But Mexico was at first excited to see the Anglo-Americans coming to colonize Texas. For one thing, it meant that there was a group of people who could deal with the natives in the area so they wouldn't have to. So Austin reapplied to the Mexican government to immigrate 300 American families. His request was granted. And in 1825, Austin brought the American immigrants into Texas. But by 1829, it was Mexico that was having a problem with the border. The Americans had continued to pour into Texas, and the 8-year-old Mexican government was becoming alarmed. They sent one of their trusted generals to Texas to assess the situation developing there.

VOICE: He comes back and reports, "Either we take steps to keep these Americans out, or we lose Texas forever."

VOICE: General Tehran's report prompted Mexico to enact the hated law of April 6th, 1830.

VOICE: Among the important provisions of the law were a ban on further Anglo-American immigration, which of course strikes a mortal blow at the whole empresario system. Also, a law abolishing slavery in Texas and various other laws aimed at strengthening relationships between Texas and Mexico and weakening American influence.

GLENN: Well, the racist -- because that's the only reason why you would want to keep people out of your country, were very alarmed, and they decided to crack down. The crack down by Mexico, which I don't know if they were thinking about building a wall or a fence, but it strained relations. And they became incredibly intense, the tensions between Mexico and Texas.

VOICE: In the wake of this law of April 1830, many American colonists in Texas are alarmed. What it means is that they're cut off from friends and relatives back in the United States who now can't join them in Texas. They had intended, of course, to grow with the land, with this new province, but now it seems that they have been relegated to a second class status.

VOICE: Land speculators, including Stephen Austin, became increasingly nervous. They petitioned for redress in the Mexican government. But this only added to the suspicions of the Mexicans. Finally, it was decided by the central government in Mexico that Texas must be garrisoned.

GLENN: The die had been cast. In a matter of just a few years, things had turned very quickly adversarial between the Texans and the Mexicans.

It's interesting to note here that even though Spain conquered the Aztecs in the region now known as Mexico all the way back to 1521 and Mexico didn't gain its independence from Spain until 300 years later, in 1821, the popular belief among so many people is that the long-time owner of that area that included Texas was Mexico. However, that's just not true.

The region was Spanish for 300 years. It's why Mexicans speak Spanish. 300 years with Spain, compared to just 15 years for Mexicans. And that's before Texas gained its independence. That struggle for Texas independence is the focus of our next episode.

Eric Weinstein, managing director of investment firm Thiel Capital and host of "The Portal" podcast, is not a conservative, but he says conservative and center-right-affiliated media are the only ones who will still allow oppositional voices.

On "The Glenn Beck Podcast" this week, Eric told Glenn that the center-left media, which "controls the official version of events for the country," once welcomed him, but that all changed about eight years ago when they started avoiding any kind of criticism by branding those who disagree with them as "alt-right, far-right, neo-Nazi, etc.," even if they are coming from the left side of the aisle. But their efforts to discredit critical opinions don't stop there. According to Eric, there is a strategy being employed to destroy our national culture and make sure Americans with opposing views do not come together.

"We're trifling with the disillusionment of our national culture. And our national culture is what animates the country. If we lose the culture, the documents will not save us," Eric said. "I have a very strongly strategic perspective, which is that you save things up for an emergency. Well, we're there now."

In the clip below, Eric explains why, after many requests over the last few years, he finally agreed to this podcast.

Don't miss the full interview with Eric Weinstein here.

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Glenn Beck: Why MLK's pledge of NONVIOLENCE is the key to saving America

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Listen to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s pledge of nonviolence and really let it sink in: "Remember always that the nonviolent movement seeks justice and reconciliation — not victory."

On the radio program, Glenn Beck shared King's "ten commandments" of nonviolence and the meaning behind the powerful words you may never have noticed before.

"People will say nonviolent resistance is a method of cowards. It is not. It takes more courage to stand there when people are threatening you," Glenn said. "You're not necessarily the one who is going to win. You may lose. But you are standing up with courage for the ideas that you espouse. And the minute you engage in the kind of activity that the other side is engaging in, you discredit the movement. You discredit everything we believe in."

Take MLK's words to heart, America. We must stand with courage, nonviolently, with love for all, and strive for peace and rule of law, not "winning."

Watch the video below for more:

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Conservatives are between a rock and a hard place with Section 230 and Big Tech censorship. We don't want more government regulation, but have we moved beyond the ability of Section 230 reforms to rein in Big Tech's rising power?

Rachel Bovard, Conservative Partnership Institute's senior director of policy, joined the Glenn Beck radio program to give her thoughts and propose a possibly bipartisan alternative: enforcing our existing antitrust laws.

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Dan Bongino, host of The Dan Bongino Show, is an investor in Parler — the social media platform that actually believes in free speech. Parler was attacked by Big Tech — namely Amazon, Apple, and Google — earlier this week, but Bongino says the company isn't giving up without a fight. In fact, he says, he's willing to go bankrupt over this one.

Dan joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to detail what he calls a "smear" campaign behind the scenes, and how he believes we can move forward from Big Tech's control.

"You have no idea how bad this was behind the scenes," Dan told Glenn. "I know you're probably thinking ... well, how much worse can the attack on Parler have gotten than three trillion-dollar companies — Amazon, Apple, and Google — all seemingly coordinated to remove your business from the face of the Earth? Well, behind the scenes, it's even worse. I mean, there are smear campaigns, pressure campaigns ... lawyers, bankers, everyone, to get this company ... wiped from the face of the earth. It's incredible."

Dan emphasized that he would not give up without a fight, because what's he's really fighting for is the right to free speech for all Americans, regardless of their political opinions, without fear of being banned, blacklisted, or losing jobs and businesses.

"I will go bankrupt. I will go absolutely destitute before I let this go," he said. "I have had some very scary moments in my life and they put horse blinders on me. I know what matters now. It's not money. It's not houses. It's none of that crap. It's this: the ability to exist in a free country, where you can express your ideas freely."

Watch the video below to hear more from Dan:

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