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UK Death Panel Rules Baby Should 'Die With Dignity,' History Teaches Brutal Lesson of What Comes Next

Charlie Gard was born in England eleven months ago with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, a condition that leads to weakened muscles, organ dysfunction and other really awful symptoms. It's a poor prognosis for most patients, but there are some experimental treatments going on in the United States. Like any parent would, Charlie's parents raised all the money they could, $1.6 million to be exact, and tried to have him moved to America to keep up the fight.

Sadly, the hospital said he shouldn't be moved and went so far as to take the parents to court to keep him there. Why would the hospital do this? The answer is not only confusing, it's terrifying. They said he should be allowed to just "die with dignity."

Believe it or not, this isn't the first time in history this issue has come up --- and the first time, things didn't go well at all.

"If you can't justify yourself, if you can't say, I will, I will produce more than I eat, you're just a useless eater, and that hurts all of Germany," Glenn said on radio Wednesday.

"Baby Knauer was the first baby and the first victim of the Holocaust. It started with compassion. It started exactly the way it's starting now in the West, in England. And if we don't know history on this particular case, we will be destined to repeat it."

Enjoy the complimentary clip or read the transcript for details.

GLENN: Hmm. This is such a heartbreaking battle and one that we have warned was coming for years.

I gave a speech about seven years ago on euthanasia and how a very dark society goes to nationalized health, then to rationing, and then they begin what Germany began, which is the extermination of the inferior, the experimentation of those who don't have any quality of life. And they do it with compassion. And the courts will back them.

This has happened before. And I'm going to give you the history of it in a second. But let me tell you in case you don't know. There's an 11-month-old kid named Charlie Gard. He is at the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.

He has a condition that -- that leads to weakened muscles, organ dysfunction, and some really nasty other side effects and symptoms. It's a poor prognosis for most patients. Most patients, they can't do anything about. There are some experimental treatments that are going on. But the baby has been in intensive care since October.

The hospital has said, "We need to take him off life support." The parents said, "Let us take him out of this hospital. There is a hospital in America that is doing some experimental treatment." And the hospital took the parents to court.

Now, why would you do that?

Well, the hospital says, "The baby has die to with dignity." The baby is ten months old. He's crapping in his pants. There is no dignity at ten months old. You're drooling. You can't talk. You're naked half the time, and you're crapping yourself. And peeing in the face, literally, of the people who love you. What dignity do you have?

The dignity of the health care system. The control of the health care system. The setting of the standards and not letting people out of the health care system so we all understand who's in charge.

They went to court, the hospital won. The judge ruled that the hospital has the right and the parents have zero right to the care of their child now.

Now, I understand that the hospital says, "This is expensive, and we can't keep him alive. You don't have enough money." Imagine what intensive care for a 10-month-old baby costs.

I can understand. But this is what has always set the West apart from the rest of the world, that we didn't dispose of our children, that we fought the hardest for life -- all life. This is what Special Olympics is all about. That you're not somehow deformed or defective. Your life is special. Your life is sacred.

And anybody who has done any work with Special Olympics knows, I think those guys get a pass to heaven much faster than I'm getting one. There's a lot to learn from people of special needs. And there's a lot to be said by what a society does with its most vulnerable.

Now the Vatican has gotten involved. Pope Francis had the Bambino Hospital of the Vatican. The Vatican's Children Hospital reach out and say, "We'd like to transfer the child over to us. We'll take care of the child."

So now you have a hospital that wants to take the burden of this child. London said, "No. The Ormond Street Hospital said legal precedent says there is no way for this child to be transferred to any other hospital. The baby must die with dignity here.

PAT: The parents have also raised $1.6 million. 1.6 million. So they have the money for the treatment, either in the United States or in Italy. And they've got two willing recipients of this baby to try to help him.

GLENN: So how does a western society fight against the right of someone to fight for their life, when you have the money? How does the western society stand against the individual's right to fight for life?

This actually began last time, in a socialist nation. It began over in Sweden or Norway. And they were -- they were doing this kind of -- they were doing this kind of stuff. And they were talking about the -- the -- the children and the -- those with no quality of life. And Germans picked up on that.

Now, remember, America was doing the same thing here. You know, we were -- we were castrating people, sterilizing people here in the United States to make sure we had no undesirables. It was the progressive movement, the Human Betterment Society over in California that actually brought a lot of this crap over to Germany. And Germany just institutionalized it. But it was also the western nations of Sweden and Denmark and Norway that were also on this path.

STU: Another old-timey organization that really believed in eugenics that really wanted to make sure there was no undesirables as well, we give them about, what? 500 million a year today?

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: Planned Parenthood.

GLENN: Planned Parenthood.

STU: Yeah, they were in that too.

GLENN: So what happened over in Germany is the Germans were fighting over socialized medicine. Remember, there was no money. And socialism had started. Remember, the first thing the Nazis did was they started welfare programs. Socialized welfare programs. And retirement and medicine and hospitals on ships. And if you belonged to the party, you would get dental care and everything else.

So it came disguised as help. The question was, how do we afford all of this? And when the war broke out, how do we afford all of these things and build up the nation? How many potatoes is this baby going to eat in its lifetime, compared to how many potatoes -- literally, how many potatoes is this going to help grow and bring to market?

If you can't justify yourself, if you can't say, I will, I will produce more than I eat, you're just a useless eater, and that hurts all of Germany.

Baby Knauer was the first baby and the first victim of the Holocaust. It started with compassion. It started exactly the way it's starting now in the West, in England. And if we don't know history on this particular case, we will be destined to repeat it.

I had some disturbing conversations with American citizens over the weekend. Really, very disturbing. And I want to share the history and those disturbing conversations. And then tell you a little bit about the philosophy of Nietzsche that we are now repeating. And why the comparison of Rome and Israel is important for you to understand.

This is some meatier stuff. I mean, if you want to talk about Trump and his tweet and the kid, I guess we're going to talk a little about the supposed kid that CNN is supposedly harassing

STU: Which they completely deny.

GLENN: Right. We think we have a couple theories that explain what exactly is happening. And I think it's a really good teaching lesson for our kids. We'll get into that a little next hour. But let's put a little meat on the bone here and talk about, how do we save the west from being destroyed, in a second.

GLENN: So in Germany, in tying this to the baby in London, Charlie Gard, the reason why they are saying this about this child is because they don't want -- they're taking the burden away from the family, and they want the child to die with dignity because the child will have no life of dignity. That's what they're saying. Who are you to decide what life has dignity and is worth living?

I cannot imagine being a parent and staying loyal to my country, if this was happening. I -- I would disavow my citizenship. I could not live in a country that did this to my child

STU: And this is the problem with their setup there. Which is, who are they to make this decision? The ultimate authority, that's who they are.

PAT: Yeah, in medical.

GLENN: You have no choice. They tell you what you'll do. You have no recourse.

What? Are you going to go to the media? The media is preaching how great socialized medicine is. And we all have to do our part.

What? Are you going to go to another doctor? The doctor has nothing else to do. It's all through the government. So you have no recourse when you have bad treatment.

So now, in the spirit of taking care of this child, they're going to kill this child. Baby Knauer was a baby that was born in Germany and blind -- blind, deaf. I don't think had any arms. And was in excruciating pain all the time, crying. And the doctors didn't know what to do. And the family was overwhelmed.

And the parents -- or at least this is the way it was spun -- the parents wanted the baby to die because there was no -- I mean, there was no life for this child. None, in their opinion.

At the time, you couldn't just kill a child. So the new furor got involved because the parents and the hospital wrote to the furor and said, "Out of compassion, can you allow this to happen?"

Well, the furor sent his own doctors to the hospital, to visit Baby Knauer. And the furor's own doctors came back and said, "It's the compassionate thing to do."

And so Hitler wrote a long editorial about compassion and about the quality of life and how we owe it to people who don't have any quality of life, to be able to relieve them of this life and pain.

So the first victim, at least in my book, the first victim of the Holocaust was a little baby, who was in exactly this same state.

At that time, that I know of, there was no other hospital -- the pope hadn't intervened and said, "We'll take the child." The argument was, there was no one that would take this child. The pope has now intervened and said, "Let us take -- let us take him to the Vatican." I would hope that one of our hospitals here in America would stand up.

If you work at a hospital, ask your hospital why they're not standing up for little Charlie Gard. The parents have the money. They've raised over a million dollars. If it takes money, this show will raise the money to help this child get to a good hospital so we fight for life.

Why aren't the American hospitals -- now, Donald Trump has tweeted about this, in support of the child. I hope that he is working behind the scenes. I hope that one of our hospitals here are standing up and saying, "We would like to take this child."

But this is a test for us. And it is a test for us to see who we really are. Have we gone the way of Rome, or are we still the children of Israel?

And there's a big difference. And it's what Nietzsche wrote about in the 1880s. And Nietzsche's philosophy kind of, in many ways, was the precursor to the Holocaust and to the rise of the German philosophy of nationalized socialism and communism. There's an important lesson to be learned. And we need to learn it and answer the question, right now.

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