Three Things You Need to Know - October 27, 2017

Is your cereal racist?

Do you find yourself inexplicably offended this morning? If so, I think I have the answer. Quickly, retrace your morning routine in your mind. I’m guessing you probably ate a big bowl of Corn Pops for breakfast. I know, I know. It’s uncanny. How could I possibly know this?!

On Tuesday, Marvel Comics writer Saladin Ahmed suddenly found himself feeling just as you are now. He was chowing down on his big bowl of Pops, and as he was wiping the sleep from his eyes, gazing at the back of the cereal box, something caught his eye. There, in the midst of a cartoon depiction of little corn pops playing and shopping in a mall, was a darker corn pop sweeping the floor.

Excelsior! He had found the reason why a sudden creep of offense had now ruined his morning routine. Ahmed sprang into action quicker than one of his superheroes. He needed to wield the power of Twitter! He tweeted:

“hey @KelloggsUS why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor? this is teaching kids racism.”

He sat by his phone. Furiously refreshing his timeline. The offense was boiling at this point! But at 3:26pm, a response came. There on Ahmed’s twitter feed, was a response from @KelloggsUS:

“Kellogg is committed to diversity & inclusion. We did not intend to offend – we apologize. The artwork is updated & will be in stores soon.”

Victory!! Cue the slow-motion superhero walk away from, what was now, an exploding twitter timeline.

So, if you suddenly find yourself offended this morning, pull out your phone and compose that tweet. Maybe you're not even offended by the same thing that triggered Ahmed. I mean, there’s just so much to get offended by on that cereal box. Not only is the slightly darker corn pop a janitor, he’s also the only one wearing clothes! Why does Kellogg hate clothes? And the janitorial arts?

There’s just so much to get offended over these days. I don't want that to kill your spirit though. Just like Ahmed, there’s a superhero in us all. Take to social media and cry racism, sexism, feminism, transgendersim, offense-ism, whateverelse-ism, and you too can manipulate a company just as powerful as Kelloggs. To arms everyone, to arms!

The opiod crisis is at a fever pitch.

21 people will be dead before this show is over.

Why?

In America, seven lives are lost every hour to drug overdoses.

It’s not hyperbole to say that the current opioid epidemic is the deadliest drug crisis in American history. It’s so bad that President Trump declared the crisis a national health emergency yesterday.

I am impressed with Trump and Melania’s dedication to this issue. It is an honorable cause that desperately needs to be addressed. The opioid addiction is suffocating this country. That stats are truly horrifying.

Overdoses killed more people last year than guns or car accidents, and are doing so at a pace faster than the H.I.V. epidemic at its peak.

In 2015, 2 percent of deaths, one in 50, in the United States were drug-related. Opioid addiction is so bad that it contributed to the US life expectancy dropping for the first time in decades. Trump’s plan to fight this epidemic is clunky, yet noble. Of course, he is going to produce “really tough, really big, really great advertising” to discourage people from getting hooked in the first place a la Nancy Reagan.

But he also said his plan would include a requirement that federally employed prescribers be trained in safe practices for opioid prescriptions, a new federal initiative to develop nonaddictive painkillers, and suspending a rule that currently prevents Medicaid from funding many drug rehabilitation facilities.

It’s a step in the right direction. But the government alone cannot end the opioid epidemic.

Only individuals have the true power to end their addiction.

Ultimately, it falls on us to dig ourselves and our loved ones out of this opioid mire.

Leave politics out of Halloween.

“Burn in Hell” read the tombstone.

It is a rather harsh epitaph.

You’d have to be a really despicable human being to deserve that on your grave. Just think, this person was so odious that someone actually spent money on the gravestone and the unforgiving engraving.

Thankfully, it only cost Fabian Vergara ten bucks at Party City. The tombstone is a Halloween decoration on his front lawn. The scene is complete with bright yellow caution tape and a fake corpse rolled up in garbage bags.

It’s a half-hearted attempt as far as Halloween decorations go, but his yard has had some scary reactions so far. In fact, it’s tearing the neighborhood apart.

Why? Above the “Burn in Hell” part on the tombstone, Fabian wrote President Trump’s name. Fabian’s neighbor Theresa was so disgusted by the scene that she called the town officials to see if they could force Fabian to remove the foam headstone.

"I want to know how far freedom of speech goes…Fabian needs to be removed from the neighborhood," she said.

Fabian responded to his neighbor’s threats by saying, “I'm doing it for fun. It was a joke. I like Halloween, so I don't see anything wrong with that. It's a free country."

This little rift in small-town America over stupid Halloween decorations is a microcosm of what is happening in this country.

Fabian and Theresa are both wrong here.

Look, it’s just distasteful to make a display about any President’s death—let alone call for him to “Burn In Hell.” It’s not cool. But Fabian is entitled to be as repugnant as he wants. As he said, it is a free country.

Theresa is wrong because you don’t have the power to eject someone from your neighborhood just because you don’t like them. Our first amendment protects Fabian’s free speech and that’s the way it should always be.

And I hate that I even have to tell you this story.

Can we please leave politics out of a kid’s holiday? Let’s remember Halloween is for them and they don’t give a Pixy Stick about your political agenda. Just give them the candy.

MORE 3 THINGS

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

The American Journey Experience is the new home of the car Orson Welles gave to Rita Hayworth. Orson Welles gave this car to his future wife Rita Hayworth for her 24th birthday.

George Orson Welles was an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter who is remembered for his innovative and influential work in film, radio and theatre. He is considered to be among the greatest and most influential filmmakers of all time and his work has had a great impact on American culture.

Every year as Thanksgiving approaches, the fear of politics being brought up at the dinner table is shared by millions around the country. But comedian Jamie Kilstein has a guide for what you should do to avoid the awkward political turmoil so you can enjoy stuffing your face full of turkey.

Kilstein joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to dissect exactly how you can handle those awkward, news-related discussions around the table on Thanksgiving and provided his 3-step guide to help you survive the holidays with your favorite, liberal relatives: Find common ground, don’t take obvious bait, and remember that winning an argument at the cost of a family member won’t fix the issue you’re arguing about.

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

On Friday, Mercury One hosted the 2022 ProFamily Legislators Conference at The American Journey Experience. Glenn Beck shared this wisdom with legislators from all across our nation. We must be on God’s side.

Winston Marshall assumed that he would be playing banjo with Mumford & Sons well into his 60s, but one tweet — simply recommending Andy Ngo's book — was all it took for the woke mob to attack. At first, Winston apologized, saying he "was certainly open to not understanding the full picture." But after doing some research, not to mention a whole lot of soul-searching, his conscience "really started to bother" him.

On the latest episode of "The Glenn Beck Podcast," Winston opened up about the entire scandal, what he discovered in the wake of his cancellation, and why he's decided to put truth over career.

"I looked deeper and deeper into the topic, and I realized I hadn't been wrong [when] I'd called the author brave," Winston said of Ngo. "Not only was he brave, he'd been attacked by Antifa mobs in Oregon, and he was then attacked again ... he's unquestionably brave. And so my conscience really started to bother me ... I felt like I was in some way excusing the behavior of Antifa by apologizing for criticizing it. Which then made me feel, well, then I'm as bad as the problem because I'm sort of agreeing that it doesn't exist," he added.

"Another point, by the way, that I found it very frustrating, was that that left-wing media in this country and in my country don't even talk about [Antifa]. We can all see this footage. We see it online," Winston continued. "But they don't talk about it, and that's part of my, I think, interest initially in tweeting about Andy's book. Because I think people need to see what's going on, and it's a blind spot there. ... CNN and MSNBC, they don't cover it. Biden in his presidential election said it was just 'an idea' that didn't exist. I mean, did he not see the courthouse in Oregon being burnt down?"

Watch the video clip below or find the full podcast with Winston Marshall here.


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.