Just Add Bacon? Here Are Some Simple Tricks to Making a Great Thanksgiving Turkey

How do you cook a turkey without drying it out? Doc and Chef Patrick swapped turkey-roasting tips in time for Thanksgiving on today’s show.

Something Doc has always wanted to try is making a bacon-wrapped turkey. In theory, wrapping the bird in bacon can help keep it moist if you do it properly. Chef Patrick explained why “tenting” is the trick to cooking your wrapped turkey while not completely drying out the bacon.

Want more Thanksgiving tips from Chef Patrick? Listen here for a simple, delicious stuffing recipe and more.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

DOC: This is the Glenn Beck Program. I'm Doc Thompson, in for Glenn today. Because Glenn is parts unknown, enjoying the time off on the holiday. We'll be with you on Friday as well. We're off tomorrow. Friday, we'll be with you. And don't forget, we're giving a free commercial with you. If you have a product, service, business you want to promote, you can't promote somebody else's -- not talking about something you found or discovered that's good. It has to be your business. We'll help you. Call up and give you roughly 60 seconds or so to promote it. If you're promoting a website, which, of course, you should have some sort of place you have -- (?) make sure you're prepared for a lot of people to click on it.

We've done this in the past, people have forgotten about that. And then you don't get the benefit. Be prepared Friday morning, during this broadcast. To call us up. 9:00 to noon Eastern, and we will put you on. If you have a Etsy (?) products or services, consider buying for $10 a domain name that is easy to remember. And then just forwarding that to your Facebook or your Etsy account. Because those get complicated to try to -- it's I sell bacon in favor of veterans plus soap on something with till day underscore. (?) it's a little hard to remember all that. Just do kal's website.com or something like that. And it will be easy to promote. Use the #buildingAmerica. You can start using that now on Twitter. And anybody you hear on the air, we'll tweet out a link in realtime, as they're like, okay. Here's my website. Here's what I do. So you can follow along that way.

And then after the fact, if you forget, oh, I want to find out -- what was that gun website they have? You can look it up later. If you don't get through, same thing. (?) people will begin to search through that as well. It's just something we like to do on Black Friday, promote capitalism, entrepreneurship, and hopefully encourage more and more people that in the coming years, you likely will not have one job that sustains you and your family. Glenn talks about this a lot. There will probably be multiple streams of income, making a little bit here and in respect and you'll just be charged with the task of finding a way.

VOICE: It's a gig economy.

DOC: It's a gig economy. It's a new world. Maybe you farm a little bit to take care of your produce news. You do this part-time job. That part-time job. Whatever. You have a side business. This is going to help you.

One of the hardest things today is to get promoted. One of the first -- one of the most significant things when starting a business is marketing. And yet, it's one of the things that people usually don't spend money on. So you have a great product and service, it's out there. It's ready to go. Nobody knows you're there. And if you're waiting for online, everybody else is doing, you know, social media now as well. So you're inundated. You won't break through. At least when you had a brick and martar (?) there's a new pizza place. Bob's TVs, or whatever it is. You're not seeing that now on the internet. Unless you find a way to break out, right?

VOICE: Absolutely. And that's one of the things I talk about to new businesses all the time. You may have an extremely unique product and a really great target audience, that's giant. That really needs your product. But you spend more on marketing, launching a product, than you do on product development and developing the name and everything. The brand. It's really difficult if you don't know what to do. And, again, we've talked about this before. This is a great format to get exposure, (?) to dial the number.

DOC: Oh. Do you know what it would cost, based on the reach of this broadcast? Millions of people. I mean -- I mean, it's worth it. But for the average person, if you don't have that money, while you're starting a business, if you don't have that capital to invest in -- I mean, it's an investment. It works. It's difficult for you, up front, to put that money out there. This is also a part of content. Where everybody wants that information. They're trying to hear products and services. They're happy to hear your business. So Friday morning. It's 888-727-BECK. Tell your friends and family right now. Dinner tomorrow. Say, listen, cousin Pete, you got that whatever business or whatever. (?) tomorrow morning he's going to give them free cherishes. You dial them up there. You can follow me on Twitter. @DocThompsonshow. I'll be promoting that tomorrow and Friday so you don't forget. Follow Glenn. It's at Glenn Beck. Two N's, by the way.

DOC: You'll give me (?) 60 seconds, Doc?

DOC: Yes, I will. I'll give you (?) business consultant. It's Patrick Mosher. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

PATRICK: Yeah, so I've been in the business about 29 years. The restaurant business.

DOC: Okay. Hold it right there. People don't know how to market. It's not 29. It's about 30. (?)

PATRICK: About 30. (?) is that a question?

DOC: So if it's 29. You say -- about when it's round numbers.

PATRICK: Yeah.

DOC: Like Kal is about 300 pounds. About. Right?

KAL: You know, give or take.

DOC: 100 pounds.

KAL: Forty or 60.

DOC: All right.

PATRICK: Yeah. During my career as a chef, I specialized in opening restaurants. I realized I have a real talent for that. And I went the consulting route about five years ago. Well, ten years officially. But five years full-time. And now I lend my expertise (?) looking to expand or improve their operations. And I try to bring a statistic approach to restaurants, that gives (?) that chains and large operators have in looking at their costs on a daily basis and understanding what they need. And (?)

DOC: Consults for nonfood industry businesses as well. Food industry. Go to foodbizpro.com. Foodbizpro.com. I'll tweet out a link.

All right. Let's talk turkey. Literally. These fads pop up from year to year. Some of them, the deep fried turkeys. And different ways to do turkey or whatever. Some of them work. Some of them are good. Some of them, maybe it's the effort is not really good at it. Turkey is pretty simple to cook. Sorry to let the cat out of the bag. (?) turkeys are pretty basic. Pretty simple to cook, right?

PATRICK: They are. Time, right? Twenty to 30 minutes per pound. Fifteen to 20 minutes per pound. And then a way to keep it moist. That's it.

DOC: And the moist would be either roasting pan. Basting.

PATRICK: Roasting bags.

DOC: You don't to have baste.

PATRICK: You may lose a little skin. (?) if you shake the flour in there, like the directions say, it really produces a moist (?)

DOC: You put the slits. That keeps it inflated. If you're worried about the skin. You can put a couple of toothpicks.

PATRICK: It allows some of the steam to escape. You're actually still roasting it in the bag. That picture -- what's that picture you have --

DOC: Okay. Here it is. One of the recent fads, and I have to ask you about this. Is a bacon-wrapped turkey. It's an intricate. (?) imagine you line up a dozen pieces of bacon one way, then a dozen piece the other way. And you weave it into like a basket pattern. You take that layer of bacon. Put it over the outside of the turkey. Wrapping it around. And roasting it like that. Is this a gimmick? Is this worth the effort? It looks awesome. (?)

VOICE: Do I dare suffer the wrath? The bacon wrath of Twitter.

DOC: Pat. (?)

PATRICK: I do love bacon.

DOC: Listen, you're either with us or against us.

PATRICK: I'm with you.

DOC: That's what I'm saying.

PATRICK: What's that website again? Celebrity apology.

VOICE: Generator.com.

DOC: Yeah. You're either with us or you're against us. There's no borderline with bacon.

PATRICK: It's just too much sometimes. After we we had this discussion last week about bacon and turkey, I actually was watching The Chew the other day. The television show. Which I don't watch very often. But I do like some of the recipes they come up with. And I saw them doing this. And, you know,it a good way to add (?) under the skin or inject it. Or season the heck out of the inside or the outside. I can see how this is a natural flavor enhancer. (?) it's rendering the fat from the breakon. It's not just dripping off. It's attached to the turkey. How can that not be a good thing?

DOC: Yeah, and it completely wraps around the turkey. So you have a natural way to keep the juice in. That works. Would the bacon become too crisp? Because I'll bake bacon sometimes. If I'm going to (?) 45 minutes or whatever it is to bake it up crisp like that, you're talking about a turkey that may be in the oven for three hours.

PATRICK: Yeah. What I would do is start out with it covered. Tent it with foil or the lid. (?) crisping the bacon. Maybe the last 30 to 45 minutes, remove that --

DOC: Will that keep it from crisping the bacon?

PATRICK: Yeah. Because it's keeping the steam inside.

DOC: All right. That was the first question I had. Now, part of the turkey would theoretically become a little bacon-flavored. And there's nothing wrong with that. It won't be enough (?) I would probably try a smoked bacon.

PATRICK: Yeah, I wouldn't use anything sweet like the apple wood smoked. Standard cured. (?) and if you don't like cured bacon because you don't like the sufficientlyitis. You can get uncured bacon. (?) it tastes like regular cured.

DOC: Let me pause and say, I've looked for uncured bacon and stuff. That doesn't have the nitrates. And even some without the sugar. And it is as good or better.

PATRICK: It's really good.

DOC: There's a couple of brands. But the one I know is Peter sons. (?)

PATRICK: Path Patterson or peter son.

DOC: You can probably find it out there. They have a really good product. It will be more expensive than bacon. But it is awesome. And it's going to be pretty healthy for you. You don't have to worry about the nitrates in there.

PATRICK: Yeah. And something about the antibacterial (?) it cures the bacon in almost the same manor. Now, is it really good as the an in-house. (?) it's a close second.

DOC: I love it. So if you use the smoked bacon and you wrap the bacon that way, that will work. As long as the (?) you still will be able to slice this off. Or you can have the turkey or bacon together. So that will work. What other potential problems? If you're taking the drippings at the bottom of the pan, you'll have a pretty strong bacon-flavored gravy.

PATRICK: Yeah. You may (?)

DOC: It could work.

PATRICK: It would work.

DOC: Just as long as you're okay with a strong bacon-flavored gravy.

PATRICK: And turkey gives off half a gallon or more of liquid when you're baking it. So there's a lot of liquid. The ratio of fat to -- if you skim the fat off like you spoke about in the morning show, you could skim the fat off. (?) from the actual juices. From the turkey. There's not a lot of liquid that comes out of the -- (?) it's just fat.

DOC: All right. Patrick, I've talked myself in. I've talked myself in. I may do a second (?) to try it, to test it out. I think I'm going to try it.

PATRICK: Grab a chicken.

DOC: Yeah, it would be cool with the turkey.

PATRICK: 12-pounder.

DOC: And we like the (?) do you think I weave it flat on the counter and then lift it up -- (?)

PATRICK: I would just do it on the counter. Drape it over the top. Tuck it under, so it's tight underneath. Then cut a hole where the cavity would be where you can put your onion --

DOC: Do you think (?) I think I'm avoiding the stuffing.

PATRICK: Not with traditional stuffing. Because you're not supposed to do that anyway. Because the internal of the bird. (?) the interior never reaches 165. Which is what kills the salmonella. But I would stuff it with celery. (?)

DOC: I like the idea of the bird cooking much faster. You have to cook it longer. (?) the bacon wouldn't crisp up as much. Let me get a quick break in. Doc Thompson in for Glenn Beck.

DOC: Lots of -- lots of tweets coming in @DocThompsonshow. I've tweeted out a couple of things. I've tweeted out a picture to the bacon-wrapped turkey. You can see that for yourself. It's @DocThompsonshow. And I think Patrick @foodbizpro just tweeted out a link to Petersen's bacon.

PATRICK: Yeah. It's sugar-free. (?)

DOC: Seventy-five dollars for color books! Do you know how much whisky you could buy with that?

VOICE: I know how many of a lot of things I can buy with that. (?)

DOC: Seventy-five dollars for coloring to help you relax, because you just gave me a stroke. (?)

KAL: And hemorrhoids.

DOC: Oh, my gosh. Jim just tweeted something that is either one of the funniest (?) you'll likely get a divorce. He suggested you wrap up those unused color books, give it to her as prevents.

(laughter)

KAL: I don't think that will be a very good idea.

(laughter)

DOC: I think you should do it. And film her opening it up. You to do that.

Let's see here. Just tuned in to at Glenn Beck show. I swear I was listening (?) cooking my turkey, sorry. Yes, but you say that like it's a bad thing. It's not a butterball hotline. We don't just say butterballs. You know. Let's see, Wesley tweeting, turkey in a bag, 220 (?) no carving required.

22 hours. That seems long. 220 degrees. Is that a joke? I don't know.

JEFFY: 200 tent is smoking temperature (?)

DOC: All right. Have yourself a happy Thanksgiving. My best wishes to you and your family. I hope you will take a moment and count your blessings. I think that's the key to the future. And make sure to make your plans now to join us Friday morning on the morning Blaze.

Christians are conflicted when it comes to President Donald Trump. Some proudly support him and his policies, while others just can't accept the man behind the boorish language.

Ruth Graham, daughter of the late evangelist Billy Graham, joined Glenn Beck on "The Glenn Beck Podcast" this week to make a case for the president from a Christian's point-of-view.

Watch a the clip from the podcast below:

Watch the full interview below:


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Use code GLENN to save $10 on one year of BlazeTV.

WATCH: Dem goes to Trump rally and realizes Dems are screwed in 2020

Image source: BlazeTV screenshot

On Thursday's radio program ,Glenn interviewed Dr. Karlyn Borysenko, who described what it was like attending a President Trump rally as a Democrat. She told Glenn Beck that crossing party lines is nearly forbidden in liberal circles but she branched out anyway — and learned quite a bit about the other side.

Watch the video below for more on this story.

youtu.be

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Ryan: Bernie at the airport Holiday Inn

Photo by Sean Ryan

(Part One) . (Part Two). (Part Three).

Some poor guy booked a hotel at the Holiday Inn Airport Conference Center in Des Moines on February 3, 2020, assuming it would be a harmless Monday night. Only to find himself in the middle of an overflowing Bernie rally on the night of the caucuses.

For the record, the man was not a Bernie Sanders supporter. Far from it. He popped his head backward when I told him where I work, smiling. Well, grinning, to be precise.

*

After her speech, Klobuchar wandered into the crowd, immediately submerged. Selfies. Everybody wanted them. A minute later, the other candidates began to appear on screen, giving speeches.

"Bernie," asked Justin Robert Young, host of Politics Politics Politics.

"Bernie," I said, and we paced to the car and lurked out onto the depopulated streets and the trenchant cold. But we were both bright with excitement, a couple of detectives. The valet attendants in their satin outfits saw two oddities, and they were right.

Justin Young and I had just left the Des Moines Marriott Downtown for Amy Klobuchar's "Amy for America caucus night party." She gave her speech, in a brilliant maneuver. I skated the Nissan down empty streets, quietly listening to Bernie's speech on the Iowa Public Radio station.

"I love this, what we're about to do," I said, gripping the wheel, words hurried, leaning forward, tapping my left boot. "We're going to hear Bernie talking, then we'll park, then walk through some doors and we will stroll into that very room as Bernie is giving the speech that's being broadcast to millions of people."

It was like how in the game Mario Bros., Mario can jump into giant green storm drains, occasionally. Like leaping into the television and joining the cast.

"There's nobody out on the roads," one of us said. "Holiday Inn, right up there." As broad-winged commercial airplanes floated overhead. We scoured for a parking spot and each second felt wasted. Urgent. We needed to be inside that hotel. But there was nowhere to park. Even the illegal spots were taken. Cars had creviced every inch of parking lot and curb and all that, had even jammed into dark pyramids of sludge.

*

Rita Dove wrote, "I prefer to explore the most intimate moments, the smaller, crystallized details we all hinge our lives on."

*

There were so many more journalists press at Bernie's event that the only media spots left were in the overflow room, which itself seemed at capacity. Dank, too. With a heavy vibe, like a sinister library.

The entire hotel exuded gloom. A quietness you hear in locker rooms after a game that should have ended differently.

Bernie supporters, dazed, stomped out into the snow, or to the bathrooms, or just in need of a bit of stomping.

*

Back to Beechwood Lounge, where we watched the Super Bowl a day earlier. Although it felt like a week had passed since then.

Approaching midnight, by that point.

Because Justin consumes politics with an all-encompassing urgency. As if it's a duty. He's clearly studied history and politics for years. Part historian, part political scientist, but also part reporter and part comedian. On one hand, he's guided by the old school approach to journalism. Objectivity. Solemnity. Accuracy.

An American has the right to tell nobody who they voted for. Or maybe it's a cultural thing.

Snow everywhere you look, piles of it full of gas and oil, and rubbish as well. That day was unseasonably warm. The next would plummet us into literal freezing. The kind of day that slows everyone down. With all that ice, you have to be cautious about every step.

Shame is for the uninitiated.

Thanks for reading. New stories come out every Monday and Thursday. Next week, a look at Socrates' sarcasm and Cardi B's political aspirations. Check out my Twitter. Send all notes, tips, corrections to kryan@blazemedia.com

In 1990 Michael Bloomberg's employees created a short book full of crude, sexist, and shocking quotes he allegedly said at work, including one story that has him telling a female employee to "kill it" after she announced she was pregnant. Sadly, that story has him fitting right in with the Democratic party in 2020.

The booklet, titled, 'Wit & Wisdom of Michael Bloomberg,' has resurfaced to haunt the Democratic presidential candidate after "The Washington Post" published the full text on Saturday.

On the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" Monday, Pat Gray and Stu Burguiere (filling in for Glenn) shared some of the less colorful (many were too lewd to be repeated on radio,) but no less disgusting quotes.

Watch the video below:

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