Observations of an Irishman: The Idea of America Is the Ultimate Experiment

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The Beginning of an Adventure

It's 5am.

I am not an early riser, so most mornings I struggle to get out of bed. It is especially harder in the winter --- it's dark, it's cold and the days are shorter.

I am also a believer that the snooze button is my best friend --- every time my alarm goes off, I am convinced just eight more precious minutes will refresh me. I forget logic and reason at this moment. I forget that I have been asleep for six hours and am still tired, but I know just another 480 seconds will make that big difference.

Today is different.

Today, I lie in my bed wide awake, refreshed and ready to take on the world. I am lying in my bed looking at my iPad, waiting for it to go off and wondering what’s taking so long. I watch as it goes from 4:58am to 4:59am and finally to 5am.

So why is today different? Today is the start of an exciting and a unique adventure. I feel like a child on Christmas morning, because today I will board a plane and head towards the only country I truly love, where I feel like I belong and that I long to call "home."

The idea of America is the ultimate experiment of mankind at its finest.

As I rise and finish my packing, it becomes easy for my mind to wonder about the adventures that await me. I am excited to see some old friends again, intrigued at making new friends, as well as the prospect of visiting new places and experiencing different parts of America’s vast culture.

America has changed my life so much by providing answers to how life should be and its history has provided so much inspiration. The idea of America is the ultimate experiment of mankind at its finest --- an example of freedom, hope and what people can achieve when they are free to pursue their dreams.

If I had to give America a slogan it would simply be:

America = making the impossible possible!

Behind all the excitement and joy is a sense of fear and apprehension. I experience these feelings every time I do a public speaking engagement, talk on my show or write a column.

What happens if I cannot give back to America by helping inspire someone as I have been inspired? What if I can’t reach Americans and help them see their own great history and the principles that made America exceptional? What if I can’t explain why both parties are on a path towards European-style big government, which has never and will never work? How can I make a connection with people and help them understand the only solution is America’s Founding Principles? This is my constant challenge.

Outrage of the Day

With the creation of social media, it is easier than ever before to learn the news of the day and share your reaction. Today, people on all sides love to get outraged, achieve social justice and destroy someone on the other side.

As I flew into JFK and had a five-hour layover before my flight to RDU, I came across the latest outrage, which was an attack on capitalism.

There was a report of price gouging as someone was charging $100 for a case of water during the hurricane season. As you can imagine, there was plenty of outrage --- calls for government regulation to make such practices illegal, demands for pricing controls, a resurgence of the narrative that all businesses are evil and probably a fancy hashtag campaign along the lines of #DownWithCapitalism.

(Before I continue, let me state clearly I am not defending or promoting this price for a crate of water.)

I know this may shock some people, but I believe in life, you are entitled to nothing, and you certainly do not have a right to any product regardless of your situation. If I own a crate of water (or any product or service), I can choose to sell it for any price I see fit, and you have a right to purchase it or decline my price.

If you understand economics, you know there are two ways this problem can be solved.

The only solution is less government, less regulation.

Firstly, the laws of supply and demand help determine the pricing of a product --- if there is a surplus, prices go down. If there is a shortage they go up. If a business puts a price of $100 on a crate of water and enough people say "no," eventually the business will have to reduce the price until enough people are happy and decide to purchase the water, because business cannot make a profit without sales.

The second way has to do with your personal mindset. A growing number of people today will look at a problem and that is all they will ever see. Others will see the problem and focus entirely on finding the solution and possibly get rewarded for their efforts.

In this case, if someone is charging $100 for a crate of water, it opens the door for a new or existing competitor offer a similar product for a cheaper price. Another business might still be profitable by selling crates of water for only $80 each, which would greatly disrupt the market. The original business would then have three choices, keep his pricing the same, match his competitor’s price or beat the price. This simple solution may result in a price war between the businesses, and generally, price wars lead to greater outcomes for the consumer.

If you truly care for the consumer and have their best interests at heart, the only solution is less government, less regulation and letting individuals innovate and compete with each other for the opportunity to make a profit.

That Time I Was Price Gouged at the Airport

There's another reason I was frustrated by the "outrage" of the day. While sitting in JFK, I suddenly realized I had a price gouging situation of my own to deal with, and government regulations were making matters worse.

If you have traveled through an airport recently, you know government regulations with the assistance of the TSA make it illegal for you to bring any fluids through security gates. As a result of this regulated market, I ended up paying $8.04 for two bottles of Powerade at Hudson on the inside of the security gates.

Crazy, huh?

If you are doing the math, that adds up to nearly $90 for a crate.

Photo by Jonathon Dunne.

The above price list is from Hudson, and as you can see, a crate of water would cost $72.

This happens every day to tens of thousands of passengers as they travel through JFK, and yet where is the outrage to fix this? Where is the fancy hashtag?

Thankfully, there is no outrage, because I was not really price gouged.

Nobody was beside me with a gun saying, "you must buy this product at this price," and I could have said "no," but I was thirsty and wanted a bottle of Powerade.

Hopefully one day, airports will be open to more competition, which will bring pricing down and then once again the consumer will win.

Until then, may the idea of America continue to see us through.

Jonathon Dunne is an Irishman with a lifelong dream of becoming an American citizen. After waiting for over 13 years, Dunne received a job offer from Glenn Beck so he could achieve his dream, but unfortunately, he did not meet the requirements to apply for a visa. Unless laws change or Dunne decides to break the law (he won't), his American dream is dead. Despite this setback, he still loves America and seeks to be a positive influence on society by promoting the idea of America and God-given freedoms. While on a recent vacation, Dunne delivered sixteen presentations (for free) in eight different states across the U.S. During this time, he kept notes and we asked him to share some of his experiences. As you read the column below, imagine the words are being spoken in a thick, Irish accent. If you're having trouble imagining how that sounds, you can hear it for yourself by tuning into Dunne's free weekly podcast, "Freedom's Disciple," on TheBlaze Radio, available on SoundCloud, iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play and Stitcher.

TRUMP: The twilight hour of socialism has arrived

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The other day, at Florida International University in Miami, facing large American and Venezuelan flags, President Trump gave a rousing speech in Miami, including this line, the "twilight hour of socialism has arrived."

Trump went on to say:

Socialism is about one thing only—power for the ruling class. They want the power to decide who wins and who loses, who's up and who's down…and even who lives and who dies.

He then repeated a phrase that helped define his State of the Union address this year:

America will never be a socialist country.

Fittingly, Fox News posted an article yesterday exposing the overlooked evils of Che dangers of socialism that all too often disappear behind a flashy design on a t-shirt.

  1. Guevara said he killed people without regard to guilt or innocence. In an interview, Guevara said, "in times of excessive tension we cannot proceed weakly. At the Sierra Maestra, we executed many people by firing squad without knowing if they were fully guilty. At times, the Revolution cannot stop to conduct much investigation; it has the obligation to triumph."
  2. Humberto Fontova, author of "Exposing the Real Che Guevara," told Fox that Guevara created system that put gay people in labor camps. "The regime that Che Guevara co-founded is the only one in modern history in the Western Hemisphere to have herded gays into forced labor camps."
  3. Guevara opposed a free press: "In 1959, leftist journalist José Pardo Llada reported that Guevara told him: 'We must eliminate all newspapers; we cannot make a revolution with free press. Newspapers are instruments of the oligarchy.'"
  4. Guevara made racist statements: Guevara went on to write: "the black is indolent and a dreamer; spending his meager wage on frivolity or drink; the European has a tradition of work and saving."

These are just some of the many historical examples of the failure of socialism. President Trump is right. If the frivolities of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Saunders catch on and spread, we could have an unbelievable problem on our hands.

Poor Jussie: His narrative is falling apart completely

Tasia Wells/Getty Images for Espolòn

Here's how the media works now: Find a story that confirms their narrative, run it constantly and relentlessly. When the real story comes out, minimize exposure of the correction. Repeat.

We're seeing this pattern play out over and over again.

RELATED: John Ziegler isn't buying what Jussie Smollett's selling either

Here are some of the knee-jerk reactions that the media had to this Jessie Smollett hoax, from Insider Edition, CNN, E! News, Headline News, CNBC, TMZ, to name a few:


Montage: Watch the Media Uncritically Accept Another Outlandish 'Hate Crime' youtu.be


And those are just the reactions on TV. It was just as bad, at times worse, in print and online. I'll give you one special example, however. Because, you know the situation is bad when TMZ is connecting the dots and seeing through this guy's story:

The sources say there were red flags from the get go. Cops were extremely suspicious when Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera. And there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed 'This is MAGA country' because 'Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.''

Here's the man himself, in an interview just days after the alleged beating…I'm sorry, the alleged "modern day lynching." Here he is in an interview with ABC News, complaining about people making up stuff:



Strong words, spoken by a man who, allegedly, created the whole narrative to begin with.

This compromise is an abomination

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Three decades ago, "The Art of the Deal" made Donald Trump a household name. A lot has happened since then. But you can trace many of Trump's actions back to that book.

Art of the Deal:

In the end, you're measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.

People laughed when he announced that he was running for President. And I mean that literally. Remember the 2011 White House Correspondents' Dinner when Obama roasted Trump, viciously, mocking the very idea that Trump could ever be President. Now, he's President.

You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion and get all kinds of press, and you can throw in a little hyperbole. But if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.

This empire-building is a mark of Trump.

RELATED: 'Arrogant fool' Jim Acosta exposed MSM's dishonest border agenda — again.

The most recent example is the border wall. Yesterday, congress reached a compromise on funding for the border wall. Weeks of tense back-and-forth built up to that moment. At times, it seemed like neither side would budge. Trump stuck to his guns, the government shut down, Trump refused to budge, then, miraculously, the lights came back on again. The result was a compromise. Or at least that's how it appeared.

But really, Trump got what he wanted -- exactly what he wanted. He used the techniques he wrote about in The Art of the Deal:

My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I'm after.

From the start, he demanded $5.7 billion for construction of a border wall. It was a months' long tug-of-war that eventually resulted in yesterday's legislation, which would dedicate $1.4 billion. It would appear that that was what he was after all along. Moments before the vote, he did some last-minute pushing. A national emergency declaration, and suddenly the number is $8 billion.

Art of the Deal:

People think I'm a gambler. I've never gambled in my life. To me, a gambler is someone who plays slot machines. I prefer to own slot machines. It's a very good business being the house.

In a rare show of bipartisanship, Senate passed the legislation 83-16, and the House followed with 300-128. Today, Trump will sign the bill.

It's not even fair to call that a deal, really. A deal is what happens when you go to a car dealership, fully ready to buy a car, and the salesman says the right things. What Trump did is more like a car dealer selling an entire row of cars to someone who doesn't even have a licence. When Trump started, Democrats wouldn't even consider a wall, let alone pay for it.

Art of the Deal:

The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people's fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That's why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It's an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.

He started the wall on a chant, "Build the wall!" until he got what he wanted. He maneuvered like Don Draper, selling people something that they didn't even know they wanted, and convincing them that it is exactly what they've always needed.