Observations of an Irishman: American Culture Is Different

A Phony Narrative

In a strict ideological sense, I share a lot of values with both conservatives and libertarians. All of my beliefs stem from the idea that our rights are God-given, and while it's government’s job to protect those rights, people should have as much control over their lives as possible.

There's one issue about which I find myself in full disagreement with a growing number of those on the “right” today. That is their dismissive treatment of young people and college students. It is so frustrating to see the narrative online that "young people suck" and that they are nothing more than precious "snowflakes." It is frustrating because this attitude goes against a founding principle that made America exceptional and different to other nations --- the principle of believing in the individual and that you judge people by the content of their character and not some label you think they belong to.

American culture is about lifting people up and not putting them down.

The second reason it is frustrating is this attitude is the exact opposite of the American culture I love so much. American culture is about lifting people up and not putting them down, inspiring people to be better and to reach for the stars, not condemning them and saying, "you are the problem."

I was honored to be invited to speak with several colleges during this trip and I was excited to learn the truth for myself. While speaking to a group called Young Americans for Liberty on the campuses of both Duke University and the University of North Carolina, I discovered the narrative that dismisses young people was exactly that --- a phony narrative.

I met with some amazing young people aged between 18 and 21 who knew more about free market economics than most people twice their age as they quoted Hayek, Von Mises and Smith to me. While we did not agree on every issue, it was clear to me that these young kids were well educated and well thought out on their positions, and they were humble enough to know that not everyone will agree with their positions.

Now, people will correctly point out that these students are in the vast minority on their campuses, but those kids standing for freedom on campuses need our support and encouragement, not our insults. We also need to encourage those brave young kids to speak out and try to grow their numbers. If we give that support, their numbers will grow and those young minds that survive college will be battle-tested and ready to take on more responsibility in the real world.

Lastly, if we owe younger people anything, it is a sincere apology. They cannot be blamed for the state of the debt, the size of government, advancement of government regulations, a society where innovation and entrepreneurship have lessened and socialism has become more acceptable. Young people today are the product of an environment where politicians on both sides, the media, the culture and Hollywood have advanced a phony narrative of their potential.

We need to help reverse this.

Count Your Blessings

America is such a unique and exceptional country and there is no other country you could compare it to. Sadly, I think a growing number of Americans don’t appreciate how many opportunities they have that others do not. I want to point out some differences in our societies that you may have never spent any time thinking about.

BIGGER Is Better!

When I arrive in America, one of the first things I notice is how big everyone's cars are, and how many people drive SUVs, Jeeps and trucks. It is not uncommon for the “average” American car to have a two-liter engine. In Europe, we have cars that are two-liter engines but they are not owned by many. The average engine size is around 1.6 and engines come as small as one-liter.

This also continues into the size of houses. It is not uncommon for an American home to be in excess of 2,000 square feet. In places like Ireland and the U.K., the average size is less than 1,000 square feet.

Choices Unlimited

In America, there are always multiple brands competing for your dollar. Capitalism grants Americans the opportunity to make choices in all aspects of their daily lives.

If you are reading this now, stop, take a moment out and think of the number of places you could eat at right now. Now think how far you would have to travel to get to your favorite outlet. How does that compare to Ireland, you might ask? Sure, we have places like McDonald's, Burger King, KFC and Subway, but they are few and far between and America has a lot more choices.

Believe it or not, Americans also experience significant competition in the area of religion. Growing up in Ireland, my choices were to be a Catholic or Atheist. Things have gotten better over the years as we now have several Protestant churches, a couple of Baptist churches and one Mormon church in Dublin. When I was stateside, though, I had my pick of those, with the addition of various non-denominational Churches and many other faiths.

Competitive Advantage in Gas Prices

America and its people have one major competitive advantage over a large part of the rest of the world and that is the price of gasoline. The average price of gas in Ireland right now is roughly $6.50 a gallon (€1.39 per liter), but that is cheap because of a favorable exchange rate. Can you imagine the reaction in America if gas was even $5 a gallon? Can you imagine the impact on your economy? Yet this is cheaper than what Irish people and most of Europe pays every day.

On this trip, I drove a lot of miles (in the thousands) and drove cars much bigger than my Irish one and the most expensive trip to the pump I had was $31, and that was because the tank was empty. Several years ago when oil prices when at their highest in Ireland, it used to cost me nearly $100 to fill my car, which made it hard to have a full tank of fuel.

Making a Difference

I always love hearing stories about successful people; especially those where the people involved came from nothing or overcame a big obstacle. They inspire me to be better and give me hope that maybe one day with hard work I will have some of the success they achieved.

According to a recent study, America is the second most charitable nation (beyond Myanmar) in terms of donating time and money. It is always inspiring to hear about “ordinary” people seeing a need in society and stepping up to make a difference through fundraising or awareness.

American culture at its finest.

But the perfect combo, in my opinion, is when you can mix business with charity.

During this amazing trip, I found one of these amazing combos. I was given the opportunity to speak in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and wanted to meet with some dear friends for food beforehand. They introduced me to a restaurant called Mission BBQ. This is a company that serves amazing BBQ food with incredible staff at affordable prices and donates some of their profits to both police and military charities. While I was there, they were raising money for a 9/11 charity by selling branded hats and cups. During the Christmas season, they helped lay wreaths at the graves of those who had paid the ultimate price for freedom.

I am officially a fan. I don’t the next time I will get the opportunity to get stateside, but I know if I am near a Mission BBQ I will be there, and hopefully more than once.

It's just one example of American culture at its finest.

Jonathon Dunne is an Irishman with a lifelong dream of becoming an American citizen. After waiting for over 13 years, Dunne received a job offer from Glenn Beck so he could achieve his dream, but unfortunately, he did not meet the requirements to apply for a visa. Unless laws change or Dunne decides to break the law (he won't), his American dream is dead. Despite this setback, he still loves America and seeks to be a positive influence on society by promoting the idea of America and God-given freedoms. While on a recent vacation, Dunne delivered sixteen presentations (for free) in eight different states across the U.S. During this time, he kept notes and we asked him to share some of his experiences. As you read the column below, imagine the words are being spoken in a thick, Irish accent. If you're having trouble imagining how that sounds, you can hear it for yourself by tuning into Dunne's free weekly podcast, "Freedom's Disciple," on TheBlaze Radio, available on SoundCloud, iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play and Stitcher.

TRUMP: The twilight hour of socialism has arrived

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The other day, at Florida International University in Miami, facing large American and Venezuelan flags, President Trump gave a rousing speech in Miami, including this line, the "twilight hour of socialism has arrived."

Trump went on to say:

Socialism is about one thing only—power for the ruling class. They want the power to decide who wins and who loses, who's up and who's down…and even who lives and who dies.

He then repeated a phrase that helped define his State of the Union address this year:

America will never be a socialist country.

Fittingly, Fox News posted an article yesterday exposing the overlooked evils of Che dangers of socialism that all too often disappear behind a flashy design on a t-shirt.

  1. Guevara said he killed people without regard to guilt or innocence. In an interview, Guevara said, "in times of excessive tension we cannot proceed weakly. At the Sierra Maestra, we executed many people by firing squad without knowing if they were fully guilty. At times, the Revolution cannot stop to conduct much investigation; it has the obligation to triumph."
  2. Humberto Fontova, author of "Exposing the Real Che Guevara," told Fox that Guevara created system that put gay people in labor camps. "The regime that Che Guevara co-founded is the only one in modern history in the Western Hemisphere to have herded gays into forced labor camps."
  3. Guevara opposed a free press: "In 1959, leftist journalist José Pardo Llada reported that Guevara told him: 'We must eliminate all newspapers; we cannot make a revolution with free press. Newspapers are instruments of the oligarchy.'"
  4. Guevara made racist statements: Guevara went on to write: "the black is indolent and a dreamer; spending his meager wage on frivolity or drink; the European has a tradition of work and saving."

These are just some of the many historical examples of the failure of socialism. President Trump is right. If the frivolities of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Saunders catch on and spread, we could have an unbelievable problem on our hands.

Poor Jussie: His narrative is falling apart completely

Tasia Wells/Getty Images for Espolòn

Here's how the media works now: Find a story that confirms their narrative, run it constantly and relentlessly. When the real story comes out, minimize exposure of the correction. Repeat.

We're seeing this pattern play out over and over again.

RELATED: John Ziegler isn't buying what Jussie Smollett's selling either

Here are some of the knee-jerk reactions that the media had to this Jessie Smollett hoax, from Insider Edition, CNN, E! News, Headline News, CNBC, TMZ, to name a few:


Montage: Watch the Media Uncritically Accept Another Outlandish 'Hate Crime' youtu.be


And those are just the reactions on TV. It was just as bad, at times worse, in print and online. I'll give you one special example, however. Because, you know the situation is bad when TMZ is connecting the dots and seeing through this guy's story:

The sources say there were red flags from the get go. Cops were extremely suspicious when Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera. And there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed 'This is MAGA country' because 'Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.''

Here's the man himself, in an interview just days after the alleged beating…I'm sorry, the alleged "modern day lynching." Here he is in an interview with ABC News, complaining about people making up stuff:



Strong words, spoken by a man who, allegedly, created the whole narrative to begin with.

This compromise is an abomination

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Three decades ago, "The Art of the Deal" made Donald Trump a household name. A lot has happened since then. But you can trace many of Trump's actions back to that book.

Art of the Deal:

In the end, you're measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.

People laughed when he announced that he was running for President. And I mean that literally. Remember the 2011 White House Correspondents' Dinner when Obama roasted Trump, viciously, mocking the very idea that Trump could ever be President. Now, he's President.

You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion and get all kinds of press, and you can throw in a little hyperbole. But if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.

This empire-building is a mark of Trump.

RELATED: 'Arrogant fool' Jim Acosta exposed MSM's dishonest border agenda — again.

The most recent example is the border wall. Yesterday, congress reached a compromise on funding for the border wall. Weeks of tense back-and-forth built up to that moment. At times, it seemed like neither side would budge. Trump stuck to his guns, the government shut down, Trump refused to budge, then, miraculously, the lights came back on again. The result was a compromise. Or at least that's how it appeared.

But really, Trump got what he wanted -- exactly what he wanted. He used the techniques he wrote about in The Art of the Deal:

My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I'm after.

From the start, he demanded $5.7 billion for construction of a border wall. It was a months' long tug-of-war that eventually resulted in yesterday's legislation, which would dedicate $1.4 billion. It would appear that that was what he was after all along. Moments before the vote, he did some last-minute pushing. A national emergency declaration, and suddenly the number is $8 billion.

Art of the Deal:

People think I'm a gambler. I've never gambled in my life. To me, a gambler is someone who plays slot machines. I prefer to own slot machines. It's a very good business being the house.

In a rare show of bipartisanship, Senate passed the legislation 83-16, and the House followed with 300-128. Today, Trump will sign the bill.

It's not even fair to call that a deal, really. A deal is what happens when you go to a car dealership, fully ready to buy a car, and the salesman says the right things. What Trump did is more like a car dealer selling an entire row of cars to someone who doesn't even have a licence. When Trump started, Democrats wouldn't even consider a wall, let alone pay for it.

Art of the Deal:

The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people's fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That's why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It's an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.

He started the wall on a chant, "Build the wall!" until he got what he wanted. He maneuvered like Don Draper, selling people something that they didn't even know they wanted, and convincing them that it is exactly what they've always needed.