Glenn's Predictions on Technology and AI for 2018

Here comes another round of predictions for 2018.

When he introduced the topic on his radio program Wednesday, Glenn made it clear these predictions are not like others he's made in the past.

"When I say something it's usually because I just feel it in my bones," Glenn said. "'The caliphate is coming.' I just knew that it was coming. I've never sat down during the holiday and said, 'okay, what do I [predict]?' This is not a prediction. It's more of a forecast."

While his "forecast" this time may have been based more on world trends than inspiration, Glenn added an important disclaimer.

"It's not me saying, 'you know what? Put your money here.' This is me saying, 'I could see this happening in the next 12 months,'" he said.

What's your reaction to these predictions on "technology and AI"? Upvote the ones you think will actually happen.

VOTE BELOW:

An AI-generated image and/or audio file will be used to hoax the public.

This may not be revealed or understood until after the midterms or election of 2020.

Stock art sites will begin allowing you to alter pictures using AI to custom-tailor photos to your needs.

For example, you could create a picture of a city at night from a photograph taken in broad daylight, or a road through the forest in the fall from a summer photo.

New evidence will be introduced that will take us one step closer to verifying intelligent alien life.

I have my doubts, but this may be connected to the China rover mission on the far side of the moon (see other prediction), as it offers the capability to listen for the first time to low frequency radio sky. This could be instrumental in understanding the early history of the universe (we currently cannot observe this due to the radio noise of earth, which will be blocked by the moon).

Quantum computers will for the first time compute something that could not be done by traditional computers.

The software development kit is already released, so it's possible now, implemented this year.

The first large-budget AI movie will begin production using Magic Leap.

This will likely be a Star Wars movie, but I doubt it will be out by the end of 2018.

Consumer AI that attempts to gauge our emotions will be introduced.

The software development kit is already released, so it's possible now, implemented this year.

Two major illnesses (hemophilia and sickle cell anemia) will be cured by new advances in medicine.

Deep-learning robots will begin become more important in medicine.

Deep Learning has already found a home on the Board of Medicine in New York to help diagnosis cancer. This will begin to broaden in 2018 at high levels to make diagnoses more accurate. Within 10 years, it will be the preferred way to diagnosis per the consumer.

Due to the shortage of nurses and the nursing crisis in the 2020s, medical robotics will continue to make progress.

The first computers or robots to successfully mimic or "fake" human emotion will be seen. This will be used effectively in the future for home care bots, but will also create future issues as we will have taught very narrow AI how to lie or merely mimic.

The world will still not engage in vital ethical conversations regarding AI and new medical technologies.

What scientific lines should be drawn around the creation of AI (life)? How should we value those predisposed or born with disabilities? What are the ethics of elective "bionic" limb replacement, neural enhancement, gene splicing and new "Franken-monsters"?


It is the most important discussion humans must have perhaps in the history of mankind and we may have less than 10 years to decide who we are and where we are headed. 

New foods and flavors of common food items through genetics or natural manipulation will be introduced to the public broadly.

Bubblegum grapes are already on the market in limited supply. I for one will eat apples when they taste like donuts. Don’t laugh, it is coming.

Personal assistants such as Alexa, Siri and Google Home will begin to penetrate the market.

Cost and general creepiness will give way to service/benefit and better prices.

The general population will begin to realize they can no longer trust what they hear, see, taste or touch as a test of something's authenticity.

As realtime digital manipulation of video and audio become more and more real, "non-sense” will be relied on by many. This will divide the country even more as we will not know how to judge the truth, even in video or audio recordings.

Cord-cutting will continue to pick up pace as Amazon and others begin to serve linear needs.

Skinny bundles will begin to play a role in OTT options.

Lithium-ion battery performance will show significant advancement next year, doubling or even tripling capacities.

Led by Tesla in the US as well as companies in Japan, South Korea and China, this will be most significant for the auto-industry, where electric cars will start to demonstrate true mainstream penetration in established markets like the US.


Countries where lithium is concentrated, such as Argentina, will experience localized economic booms as international investment from the US, China and Japan flow into these countries to expand mining and refinement operations.


There may not be major consumer benefit in 2018, but the promise of the technology breakthrough will be in the news next year, as companies begin to plan for the transition toward lithium-based energy storage technologies.

Stay tuned for more predictions this week.

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Reform Conservatism and Reaganomics: A middle road?

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Senator Marco Rubio broke Republican ranks recently when he criticized the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act by stating that “there's no evidence whatsoever that the money's been massively poured back into the American worker." Rubio is wrong on this point, as millions of workers have received major raises, while the corporate tax cuts have led to a spike in capital expenditure (investment on new projects) of 39 percent. However, the Florida senator is revisiting an idea that was front and center in the conservative movement before Donald Trump rode down an escalator in June of 2015: reform conservatism.

RELATED: The problem with asking what has conservatism conserved

The "reformicons," like Rubio, supported moving away from conservative or supply-side orthodoxy and toward policies such as the expansion of the child and earned income tax credits. On the other hand, longstanding conservative economic theory indicates that corporate tax cuts, by lowering disincentives on investment, will lead to long-run economic growth that will end up being much more beneficial to the middle class than tax credits.

But asking people to choose between free market economic orthodoxy and policies guided towards addressing inequality and the concerns of the middle class is a false dichotomy.

Instead of advocating policies that many conservatives might dismiss as redistributionist, reformicons should look at the ways government action hinders economic opportunity and exacerbates income inequality. Changing policies that worsen inequality satisfies limited government conservatives' desire for free markets and reformicons' quest for a more egalitarian America. Furthermore, pushing for market policies that reduce the unequal distribution of wealth would help attract left-leaning people and millennials to small government principles.

Criminal justice reform is an area that reformicons and free marketers should come together around. The drug war has been a disaster, and the burden of this misguided government approach have fallen on impoverished minority communities disproportionately, in the form of mass incarceration and lower social mobility. Not only has the drug war been terrible for these communities, it's proved costly to the taxpayer––well over a trillion dollars has gone into the drug war since its inception, and $80 billion dollars a year goes into mass incarceration.

Prioritizing retraining and rehabilitation instead of overcriminalization would help address inequality, fitting reformicons' goals, and promote a better-trained workforce and lower government spending, appealing to basic conservative preferences.

Government regulations tend to disproportionately hurt small businesses and new or would-be entrepreneurs. In no area is this more egregious than occupational licensing––the practice of requiring a government-issued license to perform a job. The percentage of jobs that require licenses has risen from five percent to 30 percent since 1950. Ostensibly justified by public health concerns, occupational licensing laws have, broadly, been shown to neither promote public health nor improve the quality of service. Instead, they serve to provide a 15 percent wage boost to licensed barbers and florists, while, thanks to the hundreds of hours and expensive fees required to attain the licenses, suppressing low-income entrepreneurship, and costing the economy $200 billion dollars annually.

Those economic losses tend to primarily hurt low-income people who both can't start businesses and have to pay more for essential services. Rolling back occupational licenses will satisfy the business wing's desire for deregulation and a more free market and the reformicons' support for addressing income inequality and increasing opportunity.

The favoritism at play in the complex tax code perpetuates inequality.

Tax expenditures form another opportunity for common ground between the Rubio types and the mainstream. Tax deductions and exclusions, both on the individual and corporate sides of the tax code, remain in place after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Itemized deductions on the individual side disproportionately benefit the wealthy, while corporate tax expenditures help well-connected corporations and sectors, such as the fossil fuel industry.

The favoritism at play in the complex tax code perpetuates inequality. Additionally, a more complicated tax code is less conducive to economic growth than one with lower tax rates and fewer exemptions. Therefore, a simpler tax code with fewer deductions and exclusions would not only create a more level playing field, as the reformicons desire, but also additional economic growth.

A forward-thinking economic program for the Republican Party should marry the best ideas put forward by both supply-siders and reform conservatives. It's possible to take the issues of income inequality and lack of social mobility seriously, while also keeping mainstay conservative economic ideas about the importance of less cumbersome regulations and lower taxes.

Alex Muresianu is a Young Voices Advocate studying economics at Tufts University. He is a contributor for Lone Conservative, and his writing has appeared in Townhall and The Daily Caller. He can be found on Twitter @ahardtospell.

Is this what inclusivity and tolerance look like? Fox News host Tomi Lahren was at a weekend brunch with her mom in Minnesota when other patrons started yelling obscenities and harassing her. After a confrontation, someone threw a drink at her, the moment captured on video for social media.

RELATED: Glenn Addresses Tomi Lahren's Pro-Choice Stance on 'The View'

On today's show, Pat and Jeffy talked about this uncomfortable moment and why it shows that supposedly “tolerant" liberals have to resort to physical violence in response to ideas they don't like.

President Donald Trump has done a remarkable job of keeping his campaign promises so far. From pulling the US from the Iran Deal and Paris Climate Accord to moving the US Embassy to Jerusalem, the president has followed through on his campaign trail vows.

RELATED: The media's derangement over Trump has me wearing a new hat and predicting THIS for 2020

“It's quite remarkable. I don't know if anybody remembers, but I was the guy who was saying he's not gonna do any of those things," joked Glenn on “The News and Why it Matters," adding, “He has taken massive steps, massive movement or completed each of those promises … I am blown away."

Watch the video above to hear Glenn Beck, Sara Gonzales, Doc Thompson, Stu Burguiere and Pat Gray discuss the story.

Rapper Kendrick Lamar brings white fan onstage to sing with him, but here’s the catch

Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for American Express

Rapper Kendrick Lamar asked a fan to come onstage and sing with him, only to condemn her when she failed to censor all of the song's frequent mentions of the “n-word" while singing along.

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“I am so sorry," she apologized when Lamar pointed out that she needed to “bleep" that word. “I'm used to singing it like you wrote it." She was booed at by the crowd of people, many screaming “f*** you" after her mistake.

On Tuesday's show, Pat and Jeffy watched the clip and talked about some of the Twitter reactions.

“This is ridiculous," Pat said. “The situation with this word has become so ludicrous."