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Kentucky Is the First State to Require Medicaid Recipients to Work – Here’s What That Means

What’s going on?

The Trump administration has approved Kentucky’s plan to require some Medicaid recipients to work, making the Bluegrass State the first to necessitate work to qualify for Medicaid benefits.

How is Kentucky defining “work”?

Beginning in July, people on Medicaid aged 19 to 64 who are not disabled must put in 20 hours of work per week. Besides work hours, Kentucky will accept time spent volunteering, training for a job, searching for a job, going to class or caring for the elderly or disabled.

Does every Medicaid recipient have to comply?

No. People exempt from the work requirement include “pregnant women, full-time students, primary caretakers of dependents and the chronically homeless,” according to the New York Times. People “deemed medically frail” are also excused.

How many people will this affect?

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration expects around 350,000 people on Medicaid to be affected by the new guidelines; however, the administration also estimates that around half of those people are already working the required 20 hours per week.

Glenn’s take:

While critics are already slamming the new work requirements, Glenn thought it was reasonable to expect people to “better yourself in some way or another” in order to qualify for help.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

GLENN: To receive Medicaid in Kentucky, some will now have to work for it.

Kentucky is the first state to require that able-bodied Medicaid recipients will have to work to keep their benefits. Opponents of helping people help themselves are getting ready to sue.

Republican Governor Matt Bevin received federal permission last week to implement the work requirement. Other states had tried before to get permission from the Obama administration but were denied.

So what will this cruel Republican plan entail? Starting this July, if you’re not disabled, and you’re aged 19 to 64, you must work a minimum of 20 hours a week to receive Medicaid coverage. The work requirement is broad – it can be volunteer work, job training, taking classes, caring for the disabled, or even searching for a job. There will also be exemptions to the requirement – people with medical conditions, full-time students, etcetera.

Governor Bevin said around half of the 350,000 Kentuckians who must meet the work requirement are already employed. People will also have to earn dental and vision benefits through things like working toward a GED or taking a financial planning course.

Really, what is so wrong with this plan, other than it coming from Republicans?

“It will soon become the standard and the norm in the United States of America,” Governor Bevin said, “and America will be better for it.”

But critics are already pouncing, saying this plan will seriously harm people and that it violates Medicaid law. So, they’d prefer people stay unemployed and on government assistance?

Another politician had something to say about that: “We must make it a national principle that we will not tolerate a large army of unemployed, that we will arrange our national economy to end our present unemployment as soon as we can, and then to take wise measures against its return. I do not want to think that it is the destiny of any American to remain permanently on relief rolls.”

What insensitive Republican jerk said that? None. That was Franklin D. Roosevelt. Apparently, not even the godfather of the American nanny state himself wanted people permanently on government relief.

Why do Americans seem to value the best ideas in all areas of life except government? Maybe because in politics we’re too concerned with who gets the credit.

Good for you, Kentucky. I hope this experiment works.

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