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Dems are taking off their masks, it’s not a problem to be radical anymore

Remember when President Barack Obama promised, “If you like your health care plan, you can keep it”? At the time, Democrats acted like single-payer healthcare or socialized medicine would never happen. Now, fast-forward about ten years and here’s the LA Times reporting: “Like passengers leaping for a departing train, leading Democrats are scrambling to support single-payer health insurance.”

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And remember when the left said they only wanted common-sense gun-reform? Well, now former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens has called for a full repeal of the Second Amendment, and a recent poll shows that more than a third of Democrats want an outright repeal of the Second Amendment.

Meanwhile, Chris Cuomo is tweeting, “No one [is] calling for 2A repeal.”

But, wait. What’s this tweet from the vice chair of the Democratic National Committee?

So, what’s going on here?

“We have to understand what these people who have taken control of the Democratic party, who they really are,” explained Glenn on the show today. “It’s not a problem to be radical … the masks are now coming off.”

Listen to Glenn explain more in the video clip above.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.
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WATCH: This is the Maybach Ultimate Luxury SUV (2020)

Mercedes-Benz is presenting the Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury. The design of the crossover, based on an exclusive high-end saloon and an SUV, follows the philosophy of Sensual Purity.

The show car combines the comfort and typical strengths of both body styles. These include the raised seating position and the athletic looks. The Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury is conceived as an electric car. Thanks to its four compact permanent-magnet synchronous motors, it offers fully variable all-wheel drive. The output from the powertrain is 550 kW (750 horsepower). The flat underfloor battery has a usable capacity of around 80 kWh, producing an NEDC range of over 500 kilometres (according to EPA: over 200 miles). The top speed is electronically limited to 250 km/h (155mph).

The fast-charging function is also convenient: thanks to DC charging based on the CCS standard, the system allows a charging capacity of up to 350 kW. In just five minutes, enough power can be charged to achieve an additional range of around 100 kilometres (62 miles).