There's a fight against religious freedom happening in suburban Dallas

Congregation Toras Chaim sits on the corner of a noiseless street, in an affluent neighborhood of Far North Dallas, a beige water tower looming over its shoulder. From the street, the home—which lawyers have termed "the Mumford House"—looks like any of the neighboring houses, a mid-70s family home, with an intricate garden full of elaborate succulents and blooming willows and giant decorative stones. A few houses down, two people shine a yellow Mustang at the curve of the cul-de-sac. A group of young boys practice coach-pitch baseball. Chirping birds. Smiling joggers and unconcerned dogs on walks, trotting along tree-lined streets that curve into cul-de-sacs.

It's a crime watch neighborhood; the signs stalk the foremost curbs as you pass the entrance gates and appear sporadically throughout the branching streets.

Many of these homes fetch half-a-million dollars, sometime more, backed by the Highlands of McKamy homeowners' association that makes sure the yards stay trim and the unsightly fences come down.

Source: First Liberty

Rabbi Yaakov Rich, the congregation's leader, lives nearby, in a house full of books. Books in Hebrew, books in Aramaic, books in English—leather-bound, paperback, and a mixture of something in between. Rows and rows of sacred texts line the walls of each room.

Rabbi Rich only wants to be a good neighbor.

He and the congregation have lived and worshipped within the Far North Dallas eruv, sectioned off by the PVC pipe markers, for at least a decade. The area has long been a hub for Orthodox Judaism.

As you might expect, the on-paper reason for the congregation's strife is as boring and convoluted as you'd expect, full of legalese and mundane letters and descriptions of petty interactions that sprawl over hundreds of pages. We reached out to both City neighborhood and officials in Far North Dallas, and the overwhelming response was the legalistic equivalent of a shrug or a nervous, long-winded explanation.

Terms like Texas home rule city and Certificate of Occupancy float around. Interestingly, zoning is not the issue here. Dallas zoning laws allow places of worship to exist within neighborhoods. As far as we can discern, the legal case hinges on the congregation's need for parking. (The Mumford House has abundant parking, in the front and the back—the cement driveway and parking lot that wind around the house is about the size of two basketball courts.)

The feeling that the case is motivated by something deeper, something far more personal, is unshakeable. That feeling is valid.

Source: First Liberty

Congregation Toras Chaim was founded in 2007. David Schneider moved into the house across from them in 2013. The congregation predates Schneider by a decade or so, although the Mumford Home is a recent addition to the congregation. Rabbi Rich had held congregation in the converted garage of his home for three years, without a single complaint from neighbors. That Toras Chaim's legal problems began in 2013 is no coincidence. From the start, Schneider took umbrage with his new neighbors.

The aggressiveness is disproportionate to the excuse he gives.

Claims of religious persecution are easy to believe. At the very least, Schneider is a cantankerous neighbor—the type of guy who would sue a neighbor for building a fence that blocked his view to the country club, which Schneider literally did In 2000, while living in West Plano, a city bordering Dallas. Tellingly, Schneider—the man who has largely led the charge against Toras Chaim for conducting a religious service in a home—held his marriage ceremony in his own backyard.

Here are a few of Schneider's in-court complaints: "One day, a huge pile of dirt appeared on the property that was visible from the street," and, "One time, a window air-conditioning unit, which is unscreened, appeared in the living room window."

If you, like us, can't understand what is motivating all of the hostility, you're not alone. And, hopefully nothing like this will ever happen to you, in a sunny neighborhood full of manicured lawns and shiny cars and Crime Watch Neighborhood signs.

On the radio program Monday, Glenn Beck, Pat Gray, and Stu Burguiere reacted to a recent Washington Post op-ed in which the author, Ron Charles, suggests that "as Confederate statues finally tumble across America, [and] television networks are marching through their catalogues looking to take down racially offensive content," perhaps the next items that should be up on the cancel-culture chopping block are "problematic books."

"Monuments celebrating racist traitors, which were erected to fabricate history and terrify black Americans, are not works of art that deserve our respect or preservation. Similarly, scenes of modern-day white comedians reenacting minstrel-show caricatures are not ironical interrogations of racism that we have to stomach any longer. But complex works of literature are large, they contain multitudes," Charles wrote.

He goes on to argue that "calibrating our Racism Detector to spot only a few obvious sins" is but an insidious source of self-satisfaction when compared to the process of critical debate on the values and intentions of history's literary legends.

"If cancel culture has a weakness, it's that it risks short-circuiting the process of critical engagement that leads to our enlightenment," Charles wrote. "Scanning videos for blackface or searching text files for the n-word is so much easier than contending with, say, the systemic tokenism of TV rom-coms or the unbearable whiteness of Jane Austen."

Could cancel culture really spiral all the way down to book burning? In the clip below, Glenn, Pat, and Stu agreed that this radical progressive movement is really about erasing America's history and overturning the foundation of our country. The fundamental transformation of America is happening now.

Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation:


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It's been a tough year, America. Our news media is inundating us with images of destruction, violence, and division in attempts not only to desecrate our nation, but to make us turn our backs on it. That's why now, more than ever, we need to take an up-close look at America's history to remember what it is we're fighting for and how to fight for it with practical action.

Join Glenn Beck, broadcasting from Standing Rock Ranch, as he takes us to Plymouth, Gettysburg, and Federal Hall on an important journey through America's remarkable history to inspire a brighter future. Glenn asks the hard questions of every American. Is this system worth saving? Is there a better way? Where do we go from here, and how do we answer those questions?

Featuring performances from the Millennial Choirs and Orchestras, David Osmond, a very special children's choir, and guests Bob Woodson, Tim Ballard, David Barton, Burgess Owens, Kathy Barnette, Anna Paulina Luna, and Tim Barton.

Watch the full special presentation below:


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"Restoring Hope" has been a labor of love for Glenn and his team and tonight is the night! "Restoring the Covenant" was supposed to take place in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Gettysburg and Washington D.C. but thanks to COVID-19, that plan had to be scrapped. "Restoring Hope" is what was left after having to scrap nearly two years of planning. The Herald Journal in Idaho detailed what the event was supposed to be and what it turned into. Check out the article below to get all the details.

Glenn Beck discusses patriotic, religious program filmed at Idaho ranch

On July 2, commentator Glenn Beck and his partners will issue a challenge from Beck's corner of Franklin County to anyone who will listen: "Learn the truth, commit to the truth, then act on the truth."

Over the last few weeks, he has brought about 1,000 people to his ranch to record different portions of the program that accompanies the challenge. On June 19, about 400 members of the Millennial Choir and Orchestra met at West Side High School before boarding WSSD buses to travel to a still spring-green section of Beck's ranch to record their portion of the program.

Read the whole article HERE

The current riots and movement to erase America's history are exactly in line with the New York Times' "1619 Project," which argues that America was rotten at its beginning, and that slavery and systemic racism are the roots of everything from capitalism to our lack of universal health care.

On this week's Wednesday night special, Glenn Beck exposed the true intent of the "1619 Project" and its creator, who justifies remaking America into a Marxist society. This clever lie is disguised as history, and it has already infiltrated our schools.

"The '1619 Project' desperately wants to pass itself off as legitimate history, but it totally kneecaps itself by ignoring so much of the American story. There's no mention of any black Americans who succeeded in spite of slavery, due to the free market capitalist system. In the 1619 Project's effort to take down America, black success stories are not allowed. Because they don't fit with the narrative. The role of white Americans in abolishing slavery doesn't fit the narrative either," Glenn said.

"The agenda is not ultimately about history," he added. "It's just yet another vehicle in the fleet now driven by elites in America toward socialism."

Watch a preview of the full episode below:


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Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.