The horror at Beslan should be an eternal reminder of the evil power of corrupted minds

KAZBEK BASAYEV/AFP/Getty Images

It was Sept. 1st, the "Day of Knowledge", a national holiday, at School Number One in Beslan, Russia. It was a moderately cloudy day, with the darker parts hanging low over the town.

A town of just over 36,000, and there were nearly 900 students in the school, 1st through 11th grades.

Parents had gathered to accompany their children for the first day of school. The children carried elaborate bouquets of roses as they walked along in a procession. The festivity was charming, uplifting, joyful. The children were dressed in fanciful outfits. The girls wore red scarves and black-and-white dresses. The parents waved tiny flags and sang traditional songs.

RELATED: MEDIA MALPRACTICE: Key details about New Mexico terrorist camp omitted across the board

Meanwhile, 30 men and two women hid in the woods outside Beslan, 30 miles from Chechnya. Islamic militants, mostly Chechen. They had murder in them, and something darker, an unbridled malevolence.

At 9:20 AM, as the parents finished the celebratory songs and entered the building, the terrorists guided a large truck, full of guns and grenades and bombs, toward the school.

One group of terrorists herded shrieking children and parents into the front entrance, and killed two school security guards, the first victims of the attack. The first of many victims. A second group of terrorists flanked the backside of the school and rounded up parents and children, shoving them through the wooden plank doors and along a recently-cleaned hallway. The terrorist fired their guns in all directions, a red madness to their eyes, a deathly insanity, like drugged tyrants enamored of their power.

"We came here to die," they told the children, "and you will die with us."

Most of the older children had escaped when the terrorists arrived, so the hostages were mostly parents and young children, unable to run away. Imagine the children who had never been to school in their lives before that day. They must've wondered: Is this what school is? Why would we celebrate something as awful as this? And where are they taking us? And what will happen next? Are we going to die? Are we going to die?

The male terrorists wore green camouflage balaclavas, the women wore black hijabs, holes for their eyes, the searing black emptiness of their eyes, flared with something red, something deep and unhinged. Their faces were covered, but their cowardice was apparent.

Terrorist snipers took position in the school, and, as word spread through the town and armed citizens and police plotted storming the building, they fired at anyone who approached.

The terrorist swung their AK-47s at people to herd the parents and children into the gymnasium, where everyone crowded together, climbing over one another. It was unbearably hot, and within hours many of the children grew dizzy. The terrorists wired a grid of makeshift bombs around the gymnasium. Improvised explosives dangled above the huddled hostages, makeshift bombs slung together from basketball hoops like string lights. The explosives were rigged to a pedal on the floor, which one of the terrorists clamped down with his foot. The message was clear: If he lifted his foot, the bombs would explode, and people would die.

As a crowd formed outside, the terrorists began fortifying the school. They pulled all of the men from the gymnasium, and as one man tried to reassure everyone, the terrorists shot him in the back of the head. They yanked the man down along the hallway, and staged one man in front of every window, like decoys, like mannequins, like targets.

And each man was told to rip the doors from their hinges and shove them against the windows as barricades, shields. The terrorists warned that, if any of the barricades broke, the man who built it would be shot. The terrorists shot a few of the men anyway, after they'd built the barricades, of course.

The terrorists released a demand: "If anyone of us is killed, we'll shoot 50 people. If anyone of us is wounded, we'll kill 20 people. If 5 of us are killed, we'll blow up everything. If the light or communications are cut off for a minute, we'll shoot 10 people."

The two female terrorists were unaware that the target would be a school. They were uncomfortable with holding children as hostages. Both had suicide vests strapped to their waists. One day in, the belts exploded. It's unclear if the women had had enough and killed themselves, or if their male counterparts had grown sick of the women's dissent and murdered them. Parts of the women's bodies liquified throughout the gym. One of their heads rolled around next to a group of screaming children.

Starved and thirsty, cramped into the airless gym, the children ate the flowers they'd brought as part of the holiday, sharing so that everyone had something to eat. The terrorists wouldn't allow them to leave to use the bathroom.

Over the course of three days in September the 1,110 hostages remained cramped in the building.

Over the course of three days in September the 1,110 hostages remained cramped in the building.

At 1:06 PM on the third day, an explosion shook the ground. The townspeople gathered outside recoiled in fear, many broke into tears. An eerie pause hung over them. Some of the hostages had escaped, sobbing and blood-soaked and delirious.

Inside the gymnasium, the explosion had scattered the hostages against the walls, flung them onto bodies. Most of the survivors described the blast as subsuming them with enormous heat which overtook the air, an endlessly gasping heat. A gun battle erupted between the terrorists and the Russian special forces who were moving in on the building. Some of the townspeople had joined the military, firing their machine guns in shorts and flip-flops.

It was difficult for parents or family to tell who was who. In the smoke and ash, dehydrated and gaunt, stripped to their underwear because of the unbearable heat of the gymnasium, all the children looked the same.

The terrorists herded the survivors who hadn't escaped into the cafeteria, and used the women and children as human shields, firing at Russian troops from behind them, as the women and children screamed, "Don't shoot me, don't shoot me."

Another explosion in the gymnasium. A fire ravaged through the building. The firefight lasted 10 hours.

People drove wounded children in their cars because there weren't enough ambulances. Bodies lined the grass outside, only some covered by blankets. Tiny faces disfigured yet peaceful. In total, 330 people died. 18 Russian soldiers. 186 children. 200 had burns, 100 of them were burned alive.

Today, the building is a ghost of a building, derelict and gutted. A reminder that corrupted minds and poisonous ideas can lash into the real world in the worst imaginable ways.

TRUMP: The twilight hour of socialism has arrived

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The other day, at Florida International University in Miami, facing large American and Venezuelan flags, President Trump gave a rousing speech in Miami, including this line, the "twilight hour of socialism has arrived."

Trump went on to say:

Socialism is about one thing only—power for the ruling class. They want the power to decide who wins and who loses, who's up and who's down…and even who lives and who dies.

He then repeated a phrase that helped define his State of the Union address this year:

America will never be a socialist country.

Fittingly, Fox News posted an article yesterday exposing the overlooked evils of Che dangers of socialism that all too often disappear behind a flashy design on a t-shirt.

  1. Guevara said he killed people without regard to guilt or innocence. In an interview, Guevara said, "in times of excessive tension we cannot proceed weakly. At the Sierra Maestra, we executed many people by firing squad without knowing if they were fully guilty. At times, the Revolution cannot stop to conduct much investigation; it has the obligation to triumph."
  2. Humberto Fontova, author of "Exposing the Real Che Guevara," told Fox that Guevara created system that put gay people in labor camps. "The regime that Che Guevara co-founded is the only one in modern history in the Western Hemisphere to have herded gays into forced labor camps."
  3. Guevara opposed a free press: "In 1959, leftist journalist José Pardo Llada reported that Guevara told him: 'We must eliminate all newspapers; we cannot make a revolution with free press. Newspapers are instruments of the oligarchy.'"
  4. Guevara made racist statements: Guevara went on to write: "the black is indolent and a dreamer; spending his meager wage on frivolity or drink; the European has a tradition of work and saving."

These are just some of the many historical examples of the failure of socialism. President Trump is right. If the frivolities of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Saunders catch on and spread, we could have an unbelievable problem on our hands.

Poor Jussie: His narrative is falling apart completely

Tasia Wells/Getty Images for Espolòn

Here's how the media works now: Find a story that confirms their narrative, run it constantly and relentlessly. When the real story comes out, minimize exposure of the correction. Repeat.

We're seeing this pattern play out over and over again.

RELATED: John Ziegler isn't buying what Jussie Smollett's selling either

Here are some of the knee-jerk reactions that the media had to this Jessie Smollett hoax, from Insider Edition, CNN, E! News, Headline News, CNBC, TMZ, to name a few:


Montage: Watch the Media Uncritically Accept Another Outlandish 'Hate Crime' youtu.be


And those are just the reactions on TV. It was just as bad, at times worse, in print and online. I'll give you one special example, however. Because, you know the situation is bad when TMZ is connecting the dots and seeing through this guy's story:

The sources say there were red flags from the get go. Cops were extremely suspicious when Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera. And there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed 'This is MAGA country' because 'Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.''

Here's the man himself, in an interview just days after the alleged beating…I'm sorry, the alleged "modern day lynching." Here he is in an interview with ABC News, complaining about people making up stuff:



Strong words, spoken by a man who, allegedly, created the whole narrative to begin with.

This compromise is an abomination

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Three decades ago, "The Art of the Deal" made Donald Trump a household name. A lot has happened since then. But you can trace many of Trump's actions back to that book.

Art of the Deal:

In the end, you're measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.

People laughed when he announced that he was running for President. And I mean that literally. Remember the 2011 White House Correspondents' Dinner when Obama roasted Trump, viciously, mocking the very idea that Trump could ever be President. Now, he's President.

You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion and get all kinds of press, and you can throw in a little hyperbole. But if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.

This empire-building is a mark of Trump.

RELATED: 'Arrogant fool' Jim Acosta exposed MSM's dishonest border agenda — again.

The most recent example is the border wall. Yesterday, congress reached a compromise on funding for the border wall. Weeks of tense back-and-forth built up to that moment. At times, it seemed like neither side would budge. Trump stuck to his guns, the government shut down, Trump refused to budge, then, miraculously, the lights came back on again. The result was a compromise. Or at least that's how it appeared.

But really, Trump got what he wanted -- exactly what he wanted. He used the techniques he wrote about in The Art of the Deal:

My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I'm after.

From the start, he demanded $5.7 billion for construction of a border wall. It was a months' long tug-of-war that eventually resulted in yesterday's legislation, which would dedicate $1.4 billion. It would appear that that was what he was after all along. Moments before the vote, he did some last-minute pushing. A national emergency declaration, and suddenly the number is $8 billion.

Art of the Deal:

People think I'm a gambler. I've never gambled in my life. To me, a gambler is someone who plays slot machines. I prefer to own slot machines. It's a very good business being the house.

In a rare show of bipartisanship, Senate passed the legislation 83-16, and the House followed with 300-128. Today, Trump will sign the bill.

It's not even fair to call that a deal, really. A deal is what happens when you go to a car dealership, fully ready to buy a car, and the salesman says the right things. What Trump did is more like a car dealer selling an entire row of cars to someone who doesn't even have a licence. When Trump started, Democrats wouldn't even consider a wall, let alone pay for it.

Art of the Deal:

The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people's fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That's why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It's an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.

He started the wall on a chant, "Build the wall!" until he got what he wanted. He maneuvered like Don Draper, selling people something that they didn't even know they wanted, and convincing them that it is exactly what they've always needed.