Original Post:

Many major websites like Wikipedia, reddit, Mozilla, and others are going dark today in an effort to raise awareness of SOPA and PIPA, two bills that aim to increase regulation of the internet. Glenn asked the GlennBeck.com staff this morning to post this note voicing our own concerns about the bill and asking our audience to join us in standing up against these bills, which will regulate one of the last places where people are still free to create without government interference – the internet. While we strongly believe in Intellectual Property (Mercury is a company built around our own intellectual property and that of our partners), we don’t feel that this legislation is the right solution to fighting the problem of online piracy. With so many voicing their concerns over the bill and its questionable content, we felt that the old saying “when in doubt, leave it out” should be applied to SOPA and PIPA.

Glenn, as he does with any bill expanding government power and increasing regulation, will be applying a critical eye to this proposed legislation on radio and GBTV tonight.

We encourage to reach out to your local officials in regards to this bill. Wikipedia has set up a special page on their website in order to easily find ways to contact elected leaders in your area HERE.

UPDATE:

SOPA was the top story on Glenn’s mind this morning and started the show off by calling for listeners to speak out to elected officials against this legislation.

“What are we doing with the Internet? Tonight we’re going to go into this in great detail on GBTV, but I want to tell you that there’s something wrong here and when in doubt, leave it out. There doesn’t seem to be anybody for this Internet piracy thing, and if you go to Wikipedia today, they have gone dark today in protest of this. I think everybody is against it. Google is against it. We’re against it,” Glenn said.

“It’s also about the freest market that we have in existence,” Stu said.

“Look, intellectual property is important. Copyright laws are important,” Glenn said. “The reason why America changed the world is because of our trademark and copyright laws. When we said we can copyright, patent and trademark things, that’s when the average individual got rich. Before, before the United States did this, if you invented something, a rich guy who had all the money could just take that idea and just start making it and then you’d be out.”

Despite the importance of intellectual property, Glenn cautioned that he didn’t feel like Washington needed more power, especially to police the internet.

“When in doubt, leave it out. When you have a group of people like we do in Washington that you don’t trust, I’m going to say let’s not give them any more power. Let’s not give them any more jurisdiction.”

“I would urge you to call your congressman, your senator, call anybody you can. Reach out to all of your friends. Hands off the Internet. Hands off the Internet. I’m telling you, this is a back door ‑‑ I don’t know what it is, but remember when I said they’re building structure, they’re building structure, you can’t let these things pass,” he added.