‘I didn’t write that’: Bill Ayers denies involvement in bombing detailed in his own book during interview with Megyn Kelly

Last week, Fox News released a sneak peek of Megyn Kelly’s interview with domestic terrorist turned “education theorist” Bill Ayers, in which Ayers refused to answer how many bombings he was directly responsible for during his time in the Weather Underground.

“Me, personally? I have never talked about it,” Ayers said. “Never will.”

If you followed Glenn in his Fox News days, you will recall his exposé into the radical past of Ayers and his wife – domestic terrorist turned law professor – Bernadine Dohrn. Both are former members of the Weather Underground and were a part of the group’s violent anti-government activity. They also have ties to the Obama White House.

The full Ayers interview aired Monday during The Kelly File, and Kelly continued to press the radical on his violent past. For his part, Ayers constantly deflected Kelly’s assertions – even denying some of the plot points of his own book.


Kelly confronted Ayers about the Weather Underground’s suspected involvement in the 1970 bombing of Judge John Murtaugh’s home. Murtaugh, who was the judge in a case involving the Black Panthers, was home with his 9-year-old son.

Ayers denied any involvement in the bombing, but Kelly was quick to respond with an excerpt from his own book, Sing a Battle Song, which he co-wrote with his wife and Jeff Jones. The book claims:

Two weeks before the townhouse explosion, four members of this group had firebombed Judge Murtagh’s house in New York as an action of support for the Panther 21, whose trial was just beginning.

To many people this was a very good action. Within the group, however, the feeling developed that because this action and not done netting to hurt the pigs materially it wasn’t very important.

But Ayers denied the authenticity.

“I didn’t write that,” Ayers said.

Ayers argued the words must have come from an “autonomous group.” It should be noted, however, the statements are signed by Bernadine Dhorn on behalf of the Weather Underground, according to the book.

Ultimately, Ayers admitted that his actions with the domestic terrorist group were “reckless” and “illegal” though he refused to take responsibility for any of the lives lost during the group’s reign of terror.

Watch more from the interview below: