GLENN

Glenn Goes to Bed Early, Misses Greatest Super Bowl Ever

Early to bed and early to rise makes and man healthy, wealthy and wise. According to Ben Franklin, that is.

In Glenn's case, it also makes a man miss the greatest Super Bowl of all time: The first time a quarterback has ever won five Super Bowls. The first overtime ever in a Super Bowl. The greatest comeback in Super Bowl history.

Watch the complimentary video above or read the transcript for details.

GLENN: I have such fear of, you know -- of missing out --

PAT: On the Super Bowl?

GLENN: On everything. I always -- I have that. What is that? FOBO? Is it FOBO or something? Fear of missing out. FOMO?

PAT: Uh-huh.

GLENN: You never heard that?

PAT: Yes. But I heard some other FOBO things. Something else.

(laughter)

GLENN: So, anyway -- all right.

PAT: Or maybe that's FOOBOO. That's one of those. We probably don't want to go there.

GLENN: Let's not go there. Let's move on.

Anyway, I always have the fear of missing out. Of just like, "Oh, man, that could have been historic."

JEFFY: Right.

GLENN: Last night, I go to bed, and, of course, it is the greatest Super Bowl of all time.

JEFFY: Tremendous.

PAT: Yeah, when you went to bed, it was, what, 21-3 or 28-3? Or whatever.

GLENN: Yeah, something.

PAT: I almost gave up on it at that point too. Because I was like -- I was sort of rooting for the Patriots. I didn't really care that much. But my only interest in it really was where BYU was concerned.

GLENN: Yeah, it was really -- it was really -- I mean, I thought it was colossally boring.

JEFFY: The first half was --

PAT: It was. For three quarters, it was boring. And then at 28-3, the Patriots started their comeback. And it turned out to be -- they're already calling it the greatest Super Bowl of all time now.

GLENN: Now, he is the only one that has won five Super Bowls, right?

JEFFY: Correct. Correct.

GLENN: He was tied at four with Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw.

PAT: And Terry Bradshaw.

GLENN: So he's the only one to win five. I mean, I don't know anything --

JEFFY: I mean, that's tremendous.

GLENN: He's no longer in doubt as the greatest --

PAT: No, he's -- I mean, you got to say, five Super Bowls --

GLENN: This is it?

PAT: -- and his statistics, he's probably the greatest of all time. And we should probably remove the probably.

JEFFY: Yes, we should.

PAT: The greatest of all time.

JEFFY: I think we should.

GLENN: Back in a minute.

(OUT AT 8:31AM)

GLENN: You guys are bad people.

PAT: Why? I --

JEFFY: Oh, come on now.

PAT: You're talking about the coin toss?

GLENN: I'm talking about the coin toss. And I bring it up off air. And I think -- I think that was great moment.

PAT: I thought it was really sad. I thought it was really sad.

GLENN: He's 91.

PAT: I know. And they put him in a bad position.

GLENN: No, they did not.

PAT: There was no way for him to look good there.

GLENN: He just got out of the hospital.

PAT: I know. That's why they should have given him some help. What they needed to do was have the president, his son, and his father. They could have had W. and H.W. And W. could have flipped the coin.

GLENN: Why? If I were W,. I wouldn't have done it.

PAT: Why?

GLENN: This is my dad's moment. This is my dad's moment.

PAT: Your dad's moment is passed, and he wasn't -- he's not healthy enough to have that moment right now. He's just not. He just got out of the hospital.

GLENN: You can't handle -- you can't handle the ravages of age.

PAT: No. It's hard. It's hard to see him that way.

JEFFY: Pushed out in the wheelchair.

GLENN: But it was good to see him. He was alert. He knew what was going on.

PAT: I'm not sure that's true.

GLENN: Oh, yes, he did. When the referee turned, he said --

JEFFY: Yeah, the first time, he did -- he went to reach for the coin.

(laughter)

GLENN: Yeah, he was like, where's my coin?

JEFFY: And the referee walked away. He was left hanging out there in his wheelchair waiting for the coin.

(laughter)

GLENN: He said -- he said -- you can read his lips.

PAT: That was nice. Thank you, Jeffy.

JEFFY: No. Thank you.

GLENN: You could -- you could read his -- so mean.

(laughter)

So mean.

PAT: It was not pleasant.

GLENN: It was not good.

PAT: I'm glad most people didn't see that.

JEFFY: Come on now. That's not wrong.

GLENN: I mean, you can talk about Donald Trump making fun of the handicapped guy. Look at you.

JEFFY: I watched it on the television. They showed him.

GLENN: Yeah, so bad. So bad. I thought it was a nice moment.

PAT: He couldn't flip the coin. That's the problem.

GLENN: Yes, he did.

PAT: No. It rolled off his thumb and rolled on down on the ground. It rolled.

GLENN: All right. So here's -- can we say something nice?

PAT: Yes.

JEFFY: Yes.

GLENN: And I mean this in a nice way, except it made me realize that -- Barbara hasn't aged a day.

JEFFY: She looked great.

PAT: No, she looked the same in 1989 as she does today.

GLENN: Right? And that's amazing.

PAT: It is. It is.

GLENN: Because we didn't realize she looked 90 when she was 40. But she really --

PAT: So now that she's 90, she looks 40.

GLENN: Right. It didn't work out for her when she was younger, but now --

PAT: Now it's perfect.

GLENN: She can get all of the guys that are still aware. You know, if they ever go on like a single's cruise after, God forbid, he passes on, and they're on a single's cruise. And she'll be like, "She's the one." Because she looks 40.

JEFFY: Yeah, yeah.

GLENN: But she's the same age as he.

JEFFY: They had a great reception.

PAT: They really did. You would accept that.

GLENN: The music they played was just really, just noble.

PAT: It was nice.

GLENN: It was a nice moment. A nice moment.

PAT: It was a little bit sad. But it was nice. Because it's hard to see him, you know, age this way. And he's sick.

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: I think the two of them -- I think the two of them -- who in politics is not sick?

I think the two of them though -- I love them as a couple. They always have struck me as the kind that will go out at the same time.

PAT: Uh-huh.

JEFFY: Boy, that's possible.

GLENN: It is. When she went into the hospital, when he was there --

JEFFY: When she stayed.

GLENN: No, they checked her in.

JEFFY: They put her in, yeah.

GLENN: Because she was getting sick too. And I thought, oh, my gosh. Is the Lord going to take both of these at the same time? Which in some ways, it's hard on the family, but great for them. Great for them.

PAT: Very Notebook-esque.

GLENN: Brutal, just brutal.

Anything else you want to make fun of? Anything else?

PAT: I am not making fun of him. I am not making fun of him. I just think they put him in a bad situation, and they could have made it better for him, but they didn't.

JEFFY: Yes. But I guess maybe that's the best position they had for him. Right?

PAT: I guess.

GLENN: Tell me the deal -- tell me the deal. See, look, there he is -- picture of him flipping. It did not roll out of his hands. He's throwing it up.

PAT: No, it really kind of did.

JEFFY: No, it really kind of did.

GLENN: Look at it. He's flipping it up. It's going up in the air. Look at it.

PAT: I saw it yesterday. There was a lot of flip in that coin.

JEFFY: No, there was not. There was not a lot of flip --

GLENN: Anyway -- anyway, can you tell me the deal with the egomaniacs that came out without their NFL Hall of Fame jackets at the beginning? There were like three guys that wouldn't wear the jackets.

PAT: That wouldn't wear the jackets?

GLENN: Yeah. Did you guys notice that?

PAT: No.

GLENN: Do you see when the Hall of Famers came out?

PAT: I must have missed that.

JEFFY: From the black universities?

GLENN: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

JEFFY: Yeah. There were -- Jerry Rice didn't wear his.

GLENN: Two or three.

JEFFY: And there was someone else too. Yes, you're right.

GLENN: Yeah. And they didn't wear their NFL Hall of Fame jackets.

JEFFY: Hall of Fame jacket, yeah.

GLENN: And it was amazing to me to see how the older guys came out, and they were just like, "Hi." And the younger guys, all showboats.

JEFFY: Yes.

GLENN: All showboats.

Just -- at first, they refused to wear the jacket. It appeared as though they were like, "Are you kidding me? Look at this outfit. I'm not messing with it."

PAT: I'm not messing with this.

JEFFY: I mean, that was for sure Jerry Rice. I mean, he danced out.

GLENN: Yeah. The other one too. The two that didn't --

JEFFY: I got to see --

GLENN: Yeah, the two of them that did, they both walked out, and they were both showboats. Both showboats.

PAT: I completely missed that. I must have been getting food or something, which was pretty continual.

GLENN: You, at the -- really? I'm fascinated by that.

PAT: Yeah, it was pretty continual. I know. Isn't that surprising?

GLENN: Yeah, that was a little shocking there.

PAT: Yeah. So brought up the new Hall of Fame guys?

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: Kurt Warner and LaDainian Tomlinson, those guys?

JEFFY: What Glenn is talking about is they brought out the Hall of Fame players history from black universities that have played such a prominent role in the NFL over the years. It was really good.

PAT: Oh, like guys in the Hall of Fame that went to black-only universities?

JEFFY: Yes.

GLENN: My father-in-law said -- he was watching it with us. And he said, you know, when I was growing up, when I was growing up, he said, "You couldn't find a black guy on the football team." He said, it was -- it was a big deal to be black.

He said, "Now find the white guys."

PAT: Now you can't find the white guy. Yeah, it's harder. Much, much harder.

GLENN: Yeah.

JEFFY: You know, Lambarni, Elvin Bethea, Mel Blunt, Roosevelt Brown, Willie Brown, Buck Buchanan, Harry Carson, Willie Davis, Richard Dent, Bob Hayes, Claude Humphrey, Len Ford.

PAT: Wow. Legendary.

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: All I keep thinking -- when I see these old guys, all I keep thinking is them walking out to this and thinking, jeez, if I could have just waited ten or 20 more years to play football, I wouldn't be, you know, working at the -- at the pet store right now.

PAT: Oh, yeah.

GLENN: I mean, the guys who played football when it was really playing football and now are just leading an ordinary life.

PAT: If you played in the '50s and '60s, you really wish you were born a little bit later and played today.

GLENN: Don't you think in the '70s too?

PAT: '70s, I think the salaries really started to kick in, in the '70s. Because while it was hundreds of thousands instead of millions, it was still commensurate with, I think, what they have today. You know, if you were to adjust for inflation, you would find that $400,000 in 1978 was like 4 million today, probably. I mean, they made a lot of money in the '70s. But the '50s and '60s guys made nothing.

RADIO

Malcolm Gladwell explains why memories are totally unreliable

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