BLOG

Black Lives Matter Is Organizing ‘Black Christmas.’ Here’s What That Means.

A California professor has called for Black Lives Matter supporters to continue a “Black Xmas” tradition of supporting black businesses and boycotting “white capitalism.”

“We say ‘white capitalism’ because it’s important that we understand that the economic system and the racial structures are connected,” said Dr. Melina Abdullah, a professor at California State University-Los Angeles and a national BLM leader.

Sitting in for Glenn on today’s show, Pat and Stu talked about how the BLM movement has gone far beyond protesting police brutality.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

PAT: You deserve to be vilified and your life destroyed? I don't think so. Also, Black Lives Matter is organizing something really wonderful. You might not have the best opinion of Black Lives Matter, but I think when you hear this, it will change your mind.

Black Lives Matter is organizing black Christmas.

STU: Ooh.

PAT: Where black people only buy from other black people and ignore white businesses or places that are run by white people.

STU: So it's like --

PAT: They're trying to divest from white corporations and white capitalism.

STU: Oh, thank God.

PAT: Yeah. And that's not racism. I don't want you to start your right-wing kookery and start jumping to racism. Because they're not capable of racism.

STU: I did have a thought, Pat, and I must admit this, that it does seem like -- what do they call it? Segregation.

PAT: Uh-huh.

STU: Like if you were to buy only from people in your own race and only deal with people in your own race, that seems like you might be segregating yourselves.

PAT: Yes. But, again, it's fine. Because it's Black Lives Matter doing it. So black people segregate themselves, that's only because they want to. If white people start segregating themselves, that's because they're evil and racist and hateful.

STU: Wouldn't it be better to try to advance a society where you don't care about skin color. And you wouldn't make your decisions based on skin color. Or either way.

PAT: That's cute. That's so quaint.

STU: But it was something that Martin Luther King kind of argued --

PAT: Yeah. When he said you should pay attention to the color of people's skin, not the content of their character, when he said that, I kind of cheered. Yeah. That's right.

STU: Because I think he said the opposite. I'm pretty sure. You would think it was -- it was the opposite of what he actually said. Because these people are being applauded for, you know, supporting black businesses. But if a white person had started this, they would be a white supremacist. They would be a racist. They would be a member of the KKK. They're Neo-Nazis.

STU: And people would attack them. And people would be right.

PAT: Yeah, they would be right.

STU: They would be right to do that. I wouldn't go to a business. I would not deal -- and, you know, I would not -- if I knew a restaurant I went to every day a bunch of white supremacists were behind it, I wouldn't go, right?

PAT: Yes.

STU: I wouldn't want to be part of that. We said this before. If a bakery really says, you know what, I don't want any gays in here, as several have been caught saying -- doing this about Trump supporters and other groups on the conservative side, Christians, that's happened -- but any group -- if a bakery -- were like, you know what, we don't want to serve gay people, no. I would never go to that bakery. Never.

PAT: Right.

STU: Never. Despite if they had like really delicious, moist red velvet. Even if they had that, I still wouldn't go.

PAT: What if they had Diet Coke?

STU: I do like Diet Coke.

PAT: And it was the last place you could buy Diet Coke.

STU: Well, then my rights are being violated. I have a constitutional right to aspartame that is protected --

PAT: The 29th amendment, I believe?

STU: Twenty-ninth amendment. Absolutely. If a bakery was like, you know what, we're not serving Jews, you would be like, get out.

PAT: You would be outraged.

STU: I'm never going to that place. And they would likely go out of business if they had a stance like that. But the idea that you would go and only support someone of your own race is a terrible idea, a terrible idea.

PAT: But one of the Black Lives leaders, and she's also a professor at Cal State University, Malina Abdula said, we say white capitalism because it's important that we understand that the economic system and the racial structures are connected.

We have to not only disrupt the systems of policing that literally kill our people, but we have to disrupt the white supremacist capitalist patriarchal heteronormativity system that is really the root cause of these police killings.

I think it's important to realize that Black Lives Matter has gone so far beyond the black people who have been killed by police. I mean, now it's -- to the very economic system of the United States of America. Wow.

STU: Yeah.

PAT: And now it's about heteronormativity standards. And it's about patriarchy. What is that?

STU: These things change, right?

We've talked to people who are in Black Lives Matter who don't believe those things.

PAT: But the leadership certainly does.

STU: But the leadership does. Whatever that leadership is. And many of them, as is typical with movements in the left, it always comes back to the three or four things. Socialism, communism, aborting children.

PAT: Sure does. Yep.

STU: There's three or four things that it always comes back to. And all of this -- even like -- you might say, well, it always comes back to something like global warming. Now, global warming is the other way. Global warming is a cause to get to the end. It's a means. And it is well, that global warming thing gets back to, you know, the same thing, of government control and taking money from people to do what the government seems to -- it's progressivism. That doesn't mean that everyone who believes in global warming, or is an environmentalist is like that. It's certainly not true. But it's a big part of it. And it needs to be called out. And you can't act like just because the initial motivation, right or wrong, was a positive thing. We want to protect black people from being shot unfairly. That is an absolutely positive initial ideal.

PAT: That everyone is on board with.

STU: Yeah. Everybody is.

PAT: Black, white, Hispanic, it doesn't matter. We're all on board with that.

STU: Then it goes into some that are maybe justified shootings that we're going to protest. Then it turns into every cop is really bad. Then it turns into Colin Kaepernick who is kneeling during the anthem with his pig socks and his Che shirt. And like, wait a minute. Where did we get to?

They try to make you, if you oppose what Colin Kaepernick does as a protest and you think it's a dumb protest, even though he would have the right to do it if he could stay on the actual field and keep a job, you know, they make it seem like you're against that initial cause.

We all don't -- it's nothing to do with black people. I don't want anyone shot when they're not supposed to be shot. Ever. It should never happen. It will happen occasionally. And when it does, there needs to be justice behind that.

But, you know, this is -- this is kind of where these things go. You know, the NFL players are like, well, what are you talking about? We had this -- all we're saying, we're standing up for injustice. That has nothing to do with protesting the country. Protesting the military. Then do it at any other minute of the day.

PAT: Right.

STU: Then kneel at -- during any one of the other 23 hours and 59 minutes that the anthem isn't playing. And you know who will have a problem with that? Pretty much nobody.

PAT: Very true. And they keep saying it's not about the anthem and it's not about the country. Well, that runs contrary to what Colin Kaepernick, the founder of this movement said. It was about the anthem, and it is about the country. To Colin Kaepernick, it was.

STU: Yeah. But we're supposed to take all of their best intentions. The best way you can take anything that Black Lives Matter does. For example, they want to only buy from black businesses, and they want to essentially racially segregate themselves to only do business with their own race.

And what we're supposed to take from that is, well, they're good people, and they just want to help other blacks. And, you know, look, they've had some -- they've been oppressed in the past, and we should support their efforts, to only buy from people with the same skin color as them.

PAT: Unbelievable.

STU: No. You should never make a decision based on skin color. That comes from racism. That comes from what we're talking about with Black Lives Matter. And it comes from giving free money at college to a black person over a white person because they're black. It should never ever be part of your decision-making process. That is the absence of racism.

GLENN

INSANITY: High schooler ARRESTED after not wearing mask at school tells her story

On Thursday's radio program, Grace Smith and her father, Andy, joined Glenn Beck on the phone and provided a first-hand account of Grace's refusal to wear a mask at school.

Smith, 16, began a maskless protest after her school district in Laramie, Wyoming, decided to implement a mask mandate. As a result, Grace received three suspensions, was issued two $500-citations, and was eventually arrested.

"How long were you in jail?" Glenn asked.

Grace said was taken to jail but was never booked nor was she was placed in a jail cell.

Glenn commended Grace's father, Andy, for raising such a "great citizen" and asked if it was Grace's idea to protest. Andy said it was Grace's idea, explaining that they took the position of arguing on the grounds of civil rights rather than the efficacy of wearing a mask.

Grace has since withdrawn from public school and started a home school program. She also told Glenn that she will continue to fight the school district, legally.

You can donate to Grace's legal fund here.

To hear more from this conversation click here.

Disclaimer: The content of this clip does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID-19 and/or COVID vaccine related questions & concerns.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

RADIO

Jason Whitlock: Raiders coach fired by NFL as a ‘SIGNAL’ to others

Raiders Head Coach Jon Gruden was forced to resign (fired) by the NFL on Monday due to 'misogynistic' and 'homophobic' language found in several of his old, private emails. But Jason Whitlock, sports writer and host of 'Fearless' on BlazeTV, tells Glenn that Gruden's words never should have resulted in his job lost: 'We should have accepted his apology and kept it moving.' But instead, Whitlock says the NFL chose to use Gruden as a 'signal' for all other employees who may oppose the football organization's current, far-left political stances: 'Taking over sports, taking over the NFL, is crucial to the goals of the left and what they're trying to do.'

RADIO

How an ‘orchestrated’ revolution is bringing America TO ITS KNEES

Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, joins Glenn to discuss his new book, 'The Dying Citizen.' He explains how America's hippies from the 1960s are the progressive elites running our institutions today and how their 'well orchestrated' moves have created a top-down revolution that's 'bringing us down to our knees.' So, what's the solution? Davis Hanson tells Glenn what we can do to push back against the far left today…

THE GLENN BECK PODCAST

Who Is More Evil: Government or Facebook? | Robby Soave | Ep 120

The Left and Right agree: Social media companies like Facebook are abusing their power — whether through censorship or harmful, groupthink-creating algorithms. But is the solution really more censorship and regulation, like government fearmongers and leftist "whistleblowers" have insisted? Glenn sits down with the senior editor at Reason, Robby Soave, who has a much more refreshing solution laid out in his latest book, "Tech Panic: Why We Shouldn't Fear Facebook and the Future." Politicians have weaponized the fear we have about social media. So, maybe we should be looking at the positives. Glenn and Robby take a look at the (very familiar) history of tech panic and censorship, balance the consequences of changing Section 230, and expose the real threat to the future of free speech: Progressive tyranny entrenched in the old school media.