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New California Law Will Make It Illegal for Employers to Ask This Question

What’s going on?

A new California law that went into effect on Monday forbids employers from asking job applicants about their previous salaries. It also requires California employers to give potential employees a pay range for the job they’re applying for.

Will this new law help workers?

The new law, which affects all employers of any size statewide, is intended to increase transparency and narrow the gender gap. Supporters of the bill said that if women are paid less than men for the same job and new employers base their salary on the previous one, women will continue to make less.

Pat and Jeffy talked about some of the new state laws that went into effect on Jan. 1 on today’s show while sitting in for Glenn.

“Who answers that truthfully, anyway?” Jeffy asked about the salary-related law. “’What’d you make on your last job?’ ‘$800 million.’”

Here are some of the other new laws they discussed:

Watch the clip or read the transcript below for more.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

PAT: Some of the new laws that we're looking at, as the new year begins, include the one in Texas that eliminates the possibility of just voting straight ticket. Not a huge deal.

In California, employers can no longer ask about your prior salary. Job applicants can volunteer that information if they want to. But you can't ask, hey, what did you make before? What were you making?

Strange, right?

JEFFY: Right.

PAT: Why would the government get involved in that in negotiation at all?

JEFFY: I'm guessing -- I don't know. But I'm guessing that they figured that you should be paid for what you're worth on this job.

PAT: I guess. But --

JEFFY: Who answers that truthfully anyway?

PAT: Nobody.

JEFFY: Thankfully, what did you make on your last job?

PAT: $17.9 million. Now I'm willing to come in for somewhat less than that.

JEFFY: Might be able to work on something else.

PAT: But it's got to be in the ballpark.

A new Nevada law requires employers to grant up to 160 hours of leave per year to employees who are victims of domestic violence or who have family members who are victims, or who know someone who was a victim, or has ever heard of being a victim.

JEFFY: Right. Well, I've heard.

PAT: Well, then you've got 160 hours coming.

Employers in Vermont can't request or require employees to provide their social media content. That act is meant to provide social media privacy for employees.

Well, that's kind of strange. You don't have it. If it's on social media, you've already compromised your privacy, haven't you?

JEFFY: They want their cake and eat it too. Right? You want to be able to have your social media. But you want to be able to have your job. And you want to be able to say bad things about your company.

Well, guess what, part of your job is representing the company that you work for. That's your life, right? Maybe that's just my old school thinking. But, you know, you represent who you work for.

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