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In the Year of #MeToo, Why Does This Oscar Nom Romanticize Adult-Teen Relationships?

What’s going on?

This year’s Academy Awards contenders were announced on Tuesday, and “Call Me by Your Name” was one of the Best Picture nominees. The movie starring Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer was nominated for four Oscars.

“Call Me by Your Name” is about a 17-year-old who begins a romantic and sexual relationship with an adult, his father’s research assistant. Hammer, who plays Oliver, is about a decade older than Chalamet (who plays 17-year-old Elio) in real life.

Wait, haven’t we been talking about #MeToo and #TimesUp for months?

Yes. Hollywood and many other industries went through a massive shakeup last year as Harvey Weinstein and other powerful men who abused women and (in some cases) young boys were exposed.

Actor Kevin Spacey was written out of a movie he had already filmed because multiple men came forward to say he had tried to seduce them while they were teenage boys, and GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore lost a special election in Alabama after a woman came forward to say he made sexual advances to her when she was 14.

Glenn’s take:

Glenn pointed out that in the U.S., sex with someone who is under 18 can constitute statutory rape. Why is it suddenly OK if it happens in Italy in an Oscar-nominated movie?

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

GLENN: Call Me By Your Name is probably the most hypocritical movie ever nominated for Best Picture. And that’s no easy feat for Hollywood.

If you haven’t heard of this movie, you’re in good company because most of America hasn’t either. That’s what Hollywood hopes to change by nominating it for Best Picture yesterday.

Call Me By Your Name is a new-fashioned romantic weepy about a 17-year-old boy who is seduced by, and has a sexual relationship with, an older man who spends the summer with the boy’s family in Italy.

Critics are contractually obligated to love this movie. The LA Times calls it, “Ravishing filmmaking and piercing wisdom.”

Huffington Post says of the actors who play the lovers, “some of the richest chemistry I’ve ever witnessed in a movie. It’s sublime.”

Esquire says this movie has, “Some of the most emotional moments in film history.”

There are two major problems here. First, the plot romanticizes what would qualify as statutory rape in most of the U.S. But the movie is set in Italy, so I guess that makes it okay.

Besides that, just a few months after the #MeToo movement began, followed by the Roy Moore accusations, and the end of Kevin Spacey’s career, Hollywood is celebrating a story about an older man seducing a teenage boy. Yet, Hollywood literally deleted Kevin Spacey from the movie business because he seduced teenage boys.

We can generalize about the Hollywood community here because the whole Academy votes for Best Picture nominees, not just a small committee. Hollywood is not only excusing a movie about sex between an adult and a teenager, but praising it.

As a business community and a cultural force in this country, Hollywood has zero credibility. How do you type your hashtags and wear your black protest dresses and then nominate The Kevin Spacey Story for best picture?

Here’s the thing Hollywood – you can’t have your cake and eat it too. If #MeToo and #Time’s Up are really more than slogans or a fad to you, then you must prove it through your choices. Who you choose to work with. Your story content. And the movies you nominate for awards.

Right now, all we see is #Hypocrisy.

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