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What really happened to Raoul Wallenberg: Holocaust hero who vanished without a trace

Ingrad Carlberg, author of “Raoul Wallenberg: The Man Who Saved Thousands of Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust,” joined Glenn Beck in the studio to share the untold story of a hero during the Holocaust who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews during World War II, then disappeared, never to be seen or heard from again.

In 1944, the War Refugee Board, a group established by the United States to rescue European Jews and other Nazi victims, appointed 31-year-old Raoul Wallenberg to be special envoy to Budapest, Hungary. A business man from an affluent Swedish family, Wallenberg seemed the ideal candidate as he was familiar with Budapest, spoke Hungarian and German, and was sympathetic to the plight of Jews.

Upon arriving in Budapest, Wallenberg opened an embassy office and used protective passports or employment at the embassy’s faculty to grant diplomatic immunity to thousands of Jews (some say as many as 100,000) who faced genocide during Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime. But as the war drew to a close, he was arrested as a spy and disappeared into the Soviet prison system. Wallenberg was never seen again.

In the clip above, Ingrid shares her insight into Wallenberg’s heroic life and the mystery behind his disappearance and death.

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WATCH: This is the Maybach Ultimate Luxury SUV (2020)

Mercedes-Benz is presenting the Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury. The design of the crossover, based on an exclusive high-end saloon and an SUV, follows the philosophy of Sensual Purity.

The show car combines the comfort and typical strengths of both body styles. These include the raised seating position and the athletic looks. The Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury is conceived as an electric car. Thanks to its four compact permanent-magnet synchronous motors, it offers fully variable all-wheel drive. The output from the powertrain is 550 kW (750 horsepower). The flat underfloor battery has a usable capacity of around 80 kWh, producing an NEDC range of over 500 kilometres (according to EPA: over 200 miles). The top speed is electronically limited to 250 km/h (155mph).

The fast-charging function is also convenient: thanks to DC charging based on the CCS standard, the system allows a charging capacity of up to 350 kW. In just five minutes, enough power can be charged to achieve an additional range of around 100 kilometres (62 miles).