We must have remote voting

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On the same April day that New York City saw more than 800 deaths in one day, Wisconsin voters had to go to the polls for the Democratic primary. Of course, thanks to the pandemic, Wisconsin's voter turnout rate for this election was far lower than the 2016 presidential primary, which saw a nearly 50% turnout rate. Yet, the worst problems weren't the lower turnout rate and the absentee voting rife with issues. The worst part of it was that Wisconsinites had to risk their health and safety to practice their rights as citizens.

Soon enough, every other state will have to go to the polls, and we have no real understanding of when the virus will ebb. It's time, then, that we incorporate remote electronic voting options into our electoral process.

After all, the one remote option we currently have, absentee voting, clearly isn't equipped to carry out an error-free election. This year's presidential primary left Wisconsin with an immense number of absentee votes, nearly 1.1 million, which accounted for nearly 80% of the total vote share—and the system floundered. There have been numerous reports about voters not receiving their ballots in time to vote, if at all. Moreover, there were issues regarding the postmarking of ballots such that they might not be counted. Investigations are already underway surrounding these issues.

Why are we doing this to ourselves? We should be striving for a system that allows easy access to voting so that an investigation into the integrity of an election isn't required in the first place.

Electronic remote voting, secured by blockchain technology, could very well be the key. A blockchain ledger is similar to a database that keeps track of various types of transactions. These transactions, however, are not controlled by a central computer or company, but are "dispersed across multiple computers, which can be located all over the world and run by anyone with an Internet connection." What's more, these are permanent data—once a transaction like a vote is recorded, it can't be removed or edited.

This tech has already been tested and has been proven to be secure.

This tech has already been tested and has been proven to be secure.

The trick would be to ensure each voter only votes once by way of attaching a unique voter ID into the ledger. Of course, this would require some sort of nationwide or state-by-state voter identification practice, but the upside is tremendous.

For starters, it would address standing issues of voter accessibility—anyone who is eligible with an internet connection could vote. And this type of secure, remote electronic voting would likely prevent various types of voter fraud, and is pandemic-proof.

Remote electronic voting using blockchain technology would completely disallow for cases of fraudulent voting that include identities found in obituaries, and would likely prevent ballot harvesting, as the vote depends on one's unique, individual voter ID number.

The use of a unique voter ID number, along with biometrics or other government-issued IDs ensures the votes are tied to active, eligible individuals. Moreover, voters would be able to audit their ballots to ensure the proper tallying of vote totals. In West Virginia (as well as Utah and Denver), officials launched a pilot mobile voting program that used QR codes for such self-checking.

COVID-19 will certainly affect life for quite a while, and remote electronic voting would allow us to prevent the need to wait in line with thousands of people (among a shortage of poll workers) for the upcoming primaries and general election. Too, voting would become a lot more convenient. No longer would your ability to vote depend or be upended by fewer and inaccessible polling locations, or the ability to get time off from work. Instead, it'd be a mere test of one's ability to access to the internet, which could be facilitated to local public libraries, coffee shops, or any local business with a WiFi service (which might not be a bad way to attract customers, as an aside).

We are living in a technological age. Let's start voting like it.

Anthony DiMauro is a Young Voices contributor. His work has appeared in Real Clear, The National Interest, Areo Magazine, and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyMDiMauro.

As the Senate prepares for former President Trump's second impeachment trial, many are asking whether it's constitutional to try a president after leaving office. Alan Dershowitz, lawyer and host of the of "The Dershow," joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to talk about the legal battles Trump still faces.

Dershowitz said he believes the Senate doesn't have the authority to convict Trump, now that he's a private citizen again, and thus can't use impeachment to bar him from running for office again.

"The Constitution says the purpose of impeachment is to remove somebody. He [Trump] is out of office. There's nothing left to do.
It doesn't say you can impeach him to disqualify him for the future. It says, if you remove him you can then add disqualification, but you can't just impeach somebody to disqualify them," Dershowitz said.

"The Senate can't try ordinary citizens. So once you're an ordinary citizen, you get tried only in the courts, not in the Senate. So it's clearly unconstitutional," he added.

Dershowitz, who served on Trump's legal team during the first impeachment trial, also discussed whether he thinks Trump is legally (or even just ethically) responsible for the Capitol riot earlier this month, and whether those engaging in violence could be considered "domestic terrorists."

Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation:

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A new, shocking CBS News poll shows that the majority of Americans believe they're facing a new enemy: other Americans.

More than two-thirds of poll respondents said they believe democracy in the U.S. is "threatened," and 54% said "other people in America" are the "biggest threat to the American way of life," rather than economic factors, viruses, natural disasters, or foreign actors.

Will it be possible to unite our nation with statistics like that? On "The Glenn Beck Radio Program," Glenn and Stu discussed the poll numbers and what they mean for our future.

Watch the video clip below:

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Countless leaders on the left are now arguing that removing President Donald Trump from office won't be enough — they're now calling for the president's "cult-like" supporters to be "deprogrammed." And it's not just fringe politicians.

During an appearance on "Real Time with Bill Maher" last week, former NBC anchor Katie Couric said, "The question is, how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump."

Former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Democratic Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi questioned whether the nation needs "a 9/11-type commission" to determine whether President Trump was colluding with Russian President Vladimir Putin "the day that the insurgents invaded our Capitol." Clinton also made sure to include her favorite "deplorables" in her unsubstantiated conspiracy theory:

"But we now know that not just [Trump] but his enablers, his accomplices, his cult members, have the same disregard for democracy," Clinton said to Pelosi.

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson and New York Times Magazine's Nikole Hannah-Jones agreed that there is a need for "millions of Americans, almost all white, almost all Republicans" to be deprogrammed and punished, during an MSNBC interview last week.

Now, a story from the Washington Post is also preaching that narrative and even added that we need more restrictions for conservatives on social media and in the broadcast industry.

"So now we have to be deprogrammed? We've heard this over and over and over and over again, for months," said Glenn Beck on the radio program Tuesday. He read through the shocking details of the Washington Post op-ed and discussed the extraordinary dangers of the latest anti-conservative movement in America.

Watch the video below:

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As calls for censorship and restrictions against conservative voices get louder, Glenn Beck said he feels an "awesome responsibility" to speak, not the words he'd personally like to say, but those he believes the Lord would want him to share.

"It's an awesome responsibility, and one that I am not worthy of," Glenn said. "I want to say ... what He wants me to say. And I have to listen very carefully, because I feel the same way you do. But that will get us nowhere."

Glenn said it's time for Americans who are awake — not woke — to come together, no matter which side of the political aisle you're on, and stand with the truth.

"We are the Alamo, we will stand. But we desperately, desperately need you," Glenn said. "We need the people who are awake — not woke — awake. You may disagree with us. We are your allies, not your enemies. And if you will not stand with us in our hour of need, there will be no one left to stand with you in your hour of need. We must all come together, anyone who is awake."

Watch the video below to hear more from Glenn:

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