BLOG

Alex Jones Hawks Supplement With 'Stuff Found in Comets'

John Oliver delved into the world of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on Sunday’s episode of Last Week Tonight, taking a look at Jones’ lucrative supplement store. It’s estimated that the InfoWars Store, which sells “vitality formula,” “lung cleanse” and other dubious health products, brings in millions for Jones each year.

The episode had gems including Jones’ own explanation of why he wears expensive Rolex watches: “I dress as a Satanist so that I could enter their world.”

Wednesday on radio, Glenn parsed an odd clip where Jones explained a particular supplement that is organic --- yet not organic.

The supplement iss “made from organic sources, but the bacteria’s GMO,” Jones said in the clip. “This stuff is only found in comets, with trace amounts in blueberries.”

“Do blueberries come from comets?” co-host Pat Gray asked jokingly.

Duh, Pat.

“You didn’t realize that blueberries . . . look at them, they’re baby comets!” Glenn countered.

GLENN: Yeah. Yeah. So here's what's crazy. So you have Al Gore, 10 percent of the population just listening to that guy. And then on the flip side, you have -- I don't even know, 3 percent, 10 percent of the population that actually will listen to the news of this guy. Listen to this.

ALEX: You've had back pain before. Maybe you've had nerves that were cut off. This creates tingling. A lot of people have their feeling come back. I'm not going to make claims. Just research it. It's true. Organically based bio PQQ. And it's not technically organic.

(laughter)

PAT: One of his products.

Oh.

ALEX: The other stuff is synthetic. Completely lab made. This is made from organic sources, but the bacteria is GMO. I'll just tell you up front. But it's not like the super high tech stuff. It's a bacteria that's just been bred to be able to then see secrete and produce this. Just like beer is bacteria.

GLENN: Okay. All right.

ALEX: That's how the Japanese do it.

PAT: Right.

ALEX: It's bioidentical. This stuff is only found in comets and in trace amounts in blueberries.

(laughter)

GLENN: This is the world we live in now.

PAT: Stuff is only found in comets -- and in trace amounts of blueberries.

(laughter)

PAT: Well, and kumquats. Some kumquats have it.

STU: Every fifth kumquat.

PAT: What the hell. What is that? First of all, GMOs, to this guy and his audience, are the worst thing imaginable.

GLENN: Ever.

STU: Right. But he can make money off of them.

GLENN: But this GMO is different.

PAT: It's not a high-tech GMO. It's just -- it's a normal run-of-the-mill GMO.

GLENN: Exactly.

STU: That's how the Japanese do it.

GLENN: It's a low-tech GMO. It's like -- it's a poor man's GMO.

PAT: It's the kind of genetically modified organism that let's say cavemen developed.

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: Would have done. Or really, really, the guys who flunked out of, you know, chemistry and all of that, they just -- they're not smart enough -- in fact, they blew up their lab themselves just trying to make a milkshake a few years ago, but they're the ones who put this one together. It's not high-tech at all.

STU: No, you'll find them in comets and blueberries. And certain packages of Twizzlers have them.

GLENN: Wait. Wait.

PAT: Do blueberries come from comets? How did they get this substance only available on comets? How did that happen?

GLENN: Please, you didn't realize that -- you didn't realize that blueberries. Look at them. They're baby comets.

STU: That's true.

PAT: Okay. Right.

STU: That's true.

PAT: Baby purply sort of comets.

GLENN: Take a blueberry. Freeze it. Put it in space. You know, make it 65 million times larger.

STU: Maybe closer --

GLENN: What do you identify that as? A comet.

STU: Maybe it's just closer than we think. When they go across the sky, they look pretty small.

GLENN: Right.

STU: So maybe it's just this blueberry, and it's only like 40 feet up. You just don't realize it.

GLENN: 40 feet? Maybe it's just out of arm's-length. You're just -- you're pointing, and you're about an inch away. Look at that in the sky.

PAT: Oh, man.

STU: But, I mean, tell me -- because you listen to that clip. And that clip is from the John Oliver rant that he had on Alex Jones this weekend, which is actually -- even though I'm not a huge fan -- very funny. But if you look at that clip that we just played of Alex Jones, it's just non-stop disclaimers. He knows he's lying to his audience. And it's the same thing with Al Gore with Dr. Maslowski. We've played that clip how many times where he has so many disclaimers built into what he's saying, you know he knows what he's saying is alarmist or he's justifying something that he knows is untrue. But he just says it because he knows -- his audience is going to go along with it. When you're this far down this road, you never disagree with what the host is saying. That's amazing.

GLENN: This is -- we really have arrived at the time when I said you're not going to know who to believe. You're not going to know what to believe. Everything will be upside down. Nobody will have any credibility. I hope you have yours at that point. We're at that point. Do you have your credibility?

VIDEOS

WATCH: This is the Maybach Ultimate Luxury SUV (2020)

Mercedes-Benz is presenting the Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury. The design of the crossover, based on an exclusive high-end saloon and an SUV, follows the philosophy of Sensual Purity.

The show car combines the comfort and typical strengths of both body styles. These include the raised seating position and the athletic looks. The Vision Mercedes-Maybach Ultimate Luxury is conceived as an electric car. Thanks to its four compact permanent-magnet synchronous motors, it offers fully variable all-wheel drive. The output from the powertrain is 550 kW (750 horsepower). The flat underfloor battery has a usable capacity of around 80 kWh, producing an NEDC range of over 500 kilometres (according to EPA: over 200 miles). The top speed is electronically limited to 250 km/h (155mph).

The fast-charging function is also convenient: thanks to DC charging based on the CCS standard, the system allows a charging capacity of up to 350 kW. In just five minutes, enough power can be charged to achieve an additional range of around 100 kilometres (62 miles).