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You'll Never Guess How Many Homes' Yearly Energy Output Al Gore's Heated Pool Would Cover

Climate change activist Al Gore isn’t exactly practicing what he preaches. As it turns out, the former vice president used enough electricity for six homes last year just to heat his outdoor swimming pool at his Nashville residence.

In the last year, Gore’s Nashville home used enough energy to power a typical house in America for 21 years, the Daily Caller reported. The National Center for Public Policy Research obtained the numbers through interviews and public records requests with the Nashville Electric Service.

Glenn, Pat and Stu examined Gore’s hypocrisy on radio Thursday.

Despite a publicized green makeover to his house, Gore in the last year consumed 230,889 kilowatt hours (kWh) at the residence, including electricity for the house, pool and entry gate in the driveway. In contrast, the typical family needs 10,812 kWh of electricity on average per year. While Gore has publicly said his home is completely powered by renewable energy, only about 3 percent of the electricity used at Gore’s Nashville residence comes from renewable energy sources.

“Is this is how you conduct your life, seriously, if you believe in catastrophic global warming?” Pat asked incredulously.

GLENN: Let's just, on stupidity, let's go here. An Inconvenient Truth came out with Al Gore. And when that happened, people started to look at his energy and his carbon footprint. His energy uses. And, of course, he consumed 230,889 kilowatt-hours. This is at his Nashville residence.

PAT: Yeah. That's before he even had the Malibu residence.

GLENN: Yeah. By the way, 230,889 kilowatt-hours. So you know, the average home uses 10,812 kilowatt-hours of electricity.

STU: So you're saying 20 times.

JEFFY: A little bit more.

PAT: Twenty times the average.

GLENN: Yeah, stop after he won in 2007, they found that he was using 20 times more electricity than the average household. So when that became public knowledge, he decided to change his way. And he was going to give his whole place a green makeover. He added 33 solar panels. That cost him 60,000. He upgraded the home windows and ductwork. Replaced the installation. Put in driveway rainwater collection system. Installed a geothermal heating system. And then he changed all the lightbulbs to fluorescent lightbulbs. Total renovations cost well over 250,000 dollars.

Okay. Here's what he has now, now that, you know, he's got another movie out. Let's check his carbon footprint in his second home -- in -- the same home he just did to make it green.

PAT: Yeah, this is the Nashville home still, right?

GLENN: Yeah, this is his second home. His Nashville home. Or is Malibu his second home?

PAT: I think Malibu is his primary residence now.

GLENN: Yeah. So Nashville is his second home. So he's not really even living there. The 33 solar panels generate 12,000 kilowatt hours of electricity. That's -- that's a year. That's way more than the average typical household needs. But he is such an energy hog, that the rooftop solar array that he put there, produces only 5.7 percent of the electricity that he uses. He also --

STU: That's 21 days of energy a year.

PAT: Think about how inefficient that is for a 65,000-dollar investment. That's unbelievable. Unbelievable.

GLENN: Yeah. He also --

PAT: Wow.

GLENN: He also has a couple of other problems with his home. He is currently using 30,993 kilowatt-hours of electricity. That's enough to power 34 average American homes for a month over the last 12 months.

PAT: Is this how you conduct your life?

GLENN: Seriously, if you really believe this.

STU: You don't.

PAT: If you believe in catastrophic global warming.

GLENN: No, no. You don't.

STU: It's quite clear he doesn't.

GLENN: No, you don't.

PAT: He doesn't believe it.

STU: That's, by the way, Glenn, over the past 12 months, Gore used more electricity just heating his outdoor swimming pool than six typical homes use in a year. Now, again, that is --

PAT: You don't even have a pool heater if you believe in catastrophic global warming.

STU: Of course not.

GLENN: Of course not.

PAT: You don't even have a pool if you believe that. It's insane.

JEFFY: Yeah, no way.

PAT: It's insane.

STU: You buy a smaller house. Now, look, you might now buy -- maybe you can give him a break and say he's not going to buy the smallest house possible. He's not going to go to tiny houses. I got it.

PAT: Nobody expects him to do that, unless you believe in catastrophic global warming!

STU: Then, of course, you would. Then you would.

PAT: Then you would. Yes.

STU: By the way, to put this into perspective. I looked -- I went to my energy bill this morning, as we were looking at this. Now, I am person who has never in their entire life made one decision about energy based on the environment.

PAT: Me neither.

STU: Never. I've made decisions because of money. I've made decisions because of comfort. I have never once in my entire life made one decision based on the environment when it comes to energy.

JEFFY: Welcome, Stu.

PAT: Thank you.

And I don't know. There's apparently a lot of people in the audience who have made that same choice. But think about that. Because I don't care. I do not believe that my energy choices are going to cause catastrophic global warming. It's important to know I use 64 percent less energy per square foot in my home than Al Gore does. Now, his home is bigger than mine, of course. Again, that makes no sense if he believes in catastrophic global warming. But, okay. You might think, well, yeah, he uses more energy than I do because his home is bigger.

No, per square foot, I use 64 percent less energy than Al Gore. And I've never tried.

GLENN: So here's the thing: He spent -- he spent 250,000 dollars redoing his --

PAT: Retro fitting it, yeah.

GLENN: -- home. At my ranch, I have a ranch home. It is, what? 2,000 square feet.

PAT: I think it's a little more than that. It's a little more than that.

GLENN: Yeah. But I know the top -- because it has a lot of bedrooms in the second floor, which is really underground -- the first floor is I think 15 or 1800 square feet. And that's the part that we use as a family. And it's like kind of the house I grew up in.

PAT: Yeah, it's really nice. But it's not gigantic.

GLENN: And it's not opulent.

PAT: Right.

GLENN: Okay. What we did is we spent our money in doing -- for instance, my house was the first house that was wrapped in this copper sheathing for energy and heat, to trap energy.

PAT: And it works.

GLENN: And it works. So much so that last -- last winter, when it was ten below zero for like two weeks, my power went out. I had no power in my house. Now, imagine ten below zero.

PAT: Yeah. You would think it would be really cold.

GLENN: By lighting one of the fireplaces once a day and just -- because we made doors that we have two doors. So you open one and the other door is closed. You close that one, and then you open the other one. So it's not blowing stuff in. Because it gets very cold in the winter. Just by doing that and lighting the fire with no electricity, my house, because of my installation and everything else, stayed at 68 degrees for a week.

PAT: That's pretty amazing.

GLENN: Al, why aren't you doing that? Why aren't you doing that?

PAT: Yeah.

GLENN: We're completely grid green. We're completely off the grid. We have solar and wind. Why aren't you doing that, Al? It can be done.

PAT: Such a phony. Such a fraud.

GLENN: He doesn't believe it.

PAT: It's such a hoax.

STU: We should point out, on your Facebook page is the video that debunks the main claim he made in the trailer. If you go to Glenn Beck's Facebook page -- I think yesterday it was posted. Or the day before. Look for it.

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: Because in about six minutes, just blows apart his entire case that all of his stuff has been proven right.

PAT: Yeah, it's great.

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