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What We Can Learn From Texas’ Monumental Example of Self-Reliance

The state of Texas set an exemplary standard in its display of resilience and independence as Hurricane Harvey ripped through the Gulf Coast and flooded several areas of Texas and Louisiana. In fact, the state’s unmatched example of rescue efforts and self-reliance throughout the ordeal was beyond monumental that even those on the Left could not ignore it.

'Texans’ do-it-ourselves rescue effort defines Hurricane Harvey' read a headline from the Washington Post yesterday that celebrated the ordinary people who took up the challenge to save their neighbors as buckets of rain-ravaged their towns and homes, and virtually shut down the entire Gulf Coast.

The scenes around Houston and Southeast Texas were reminiscent of a scene in Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” where civilians gathered their vessels to save soldiers stranded on the beaches surrounded by their ruthless enemies.

The state has another storm coming as it recovers from likely the most expensive natural disaster in U.S. history.

“Now, can this last through the rebuilding effort?” Glenn asked. “The question is: Can a state with no income tax be a model for a different kind of recovery effort? On its own through innovative private and public partnerships without waiting for the money from the federal government to back up to Houston?”

Today on radio, Glenn discussed whether the values Texans are known for could be applied to the country at large to fix the amount of damage caused by progressives.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

GLENN: Scavengers are now stealing from flood victims in Houston. We have seen the absolute best of humanity during the rescue phase of Hurricane Harvey.

Saturday, I saw signs of the worst. I saw scammers. I saw a sign in one neighborhood that said, "Looters, beware, this is Texas."

Scumbags are starting to rear their head, as they always do. It's really an unreal idea. People returning to their ravaged homes, sifting through what's left of their life. Putting things out in the yard to dry, and then have somebody come by and steal from them.

This is really rare in Houston, compared to New Orleans, after Hurricane Katrina. But it's still early. It's a reminder of how much still hangs in the balance for southeast Texas.

On Sunday, the mayor of Houston said, "I'm encouraging people, get up, and let's get going." This is the kind of can-do American attitude that really lives -- it's the reason why I moved to Texas. I told you, when things get tough, we need to be surrounded by the people who kind of feel the same way you do: Just get up and do it.

The Washington Post ran a story with the headline: Texans, do it ourselves rescue effort defines Hurricane Harvey. This has been a big part of the story, if not the biggest part of the story so far.

The Texan resilience and independence. Neighbors having each other's back. Now, can this last through the rebuilding effort? Because the damage is now between 150 and $180 billion. The question is, can a state with no income tax be a model for a different kind of recovery effort on its own, through innovative private and public partnerships, without waiting for the money from the federal government to back up to Houston?

Do you remember all of the FEMA debit card abuses and swindles after Hurricane Katrina? I'm sure Texas will have its fair share of it. But federal dumps of money is not the efficient solution. Besides, I don't know if you know this, FEMA is still $25 billion in debt from Hurricane Katrina and Sandy. $25 billion in debt.

The federal government can't afford this. What do we do? Print more money?

I think this is the perfect opportunity for the governor of Texas and President Trump, the businessman, to outline a different path for rebuilding for more private donations and less federal aid.

Trump was in the real estate business. He was in the construction business. As anyone can figure this out, this is his wheelhouse. And this is an opportunity for President Trump to lead and make his mark. Lead and become a unique and find a better way to lead as a president and find a responsible rebuilding. A pathway to a new and better tomorrow in Houston.

RADIO

Glenn Beck celebrates the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11

It was only 50 years ago, on July 20th, 1969, that Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to actually set foot on the lunar surface -- something that just ten years prior had been unthinkable. More than 600 million people around the world listened as Armstrong spoke these immortal words: "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." Watch the clip to hear Glenn tell the story and bring the historic day to life.