Monkey Bread, Crab Cakes: What Thanksgiving Recipe Is Your State Searching For?

What are people in your state searching for as they prepare for Thanksgiving? A survey from General Mills had some surprising results.

The study looked at three popular recipe sites to find the top recipes people were searching for in each state from Nov. 1 to Thanksgiving of last year. Californians were apparently looking for a good mac ‘n’ cheese recipe; Illinois stuck to traditional mashed potatoes; and Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia all wanted to add some heat with buffalo chicken dip.

Iowa, Nebraska and Rhode Island were all searching for the same recipe. Listen to Doc and Chef Patrick’s chat on today’s show (above) to find out what it is and how to make it.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

DOC: Hi, there. It's Doc Thompson in for Beck. And happy Thanksgiving. Hopefully you'll be getting together with family tomorrow. You'll have some good times. Hopefully you'll count your blessings, truly recognizing how much good there is in the world. We focus on a lot of bad, because it's frustrating. We want the world to be better. And I think most people want better for our fellow citizens, for our fellow man. And most of us are passionate about how to accomplish that. We know things like the Constitution lead to that good. And that's the reason we're so passionate about it.

But somewhere in there, our passion for the right to help people gets twisted just a little bit. Still driven by the same cause. We're willing to be meaner. More combative. And by we, I mean we.

I'm as guilty as anybody. I think if we take a moment and recognize that while we differ on the -- on the method, we still want the same outcome.

I'm not sure our friends on the left give us enough due. I think they really think that somehow we want some sort of society that we really don't want. That we really think oppressing people is good. Really racist, whatever.

But I for one, recognize most people on the left really want good stuff for people. I believe they're misguided. But they want good stuff. About you so on maybe we take a step back as we count our blessings and say, as F we're trying to accomplish (?) good things for the right reasons, let's make sure our methods are still good.

I know how frustrating it is. I've lived this every day. I'm on the air with it. I do the research. I see the social media. I live it every day. And it's really frustrating.

But good is good. Bad is bad. Stay focused on the good. Count your blessings.

Chef Patrick Mosher is with us. Obviously, a big favorite around the holidays. So do you cook on the holidays? Do you cook for your family? Because, you know, a lot of people they don't want to bring their work home. You know, mechanics, they don't work on their own home that often.

PATRICK: No. Cooking for family and friends is really why I do this. I love the restaurant industry and all that goes with that. But it bills down to cooking for the ones you love, absolutely.

DOC: So you still do?

PATRICK: Traditionally, I used to smoke one turkey and roast another one. Because we had such a big crowd. Not so much anymore.

DOC: Not so much anymore.

PATRICK: Yeah.

DOC: It's funny (?) on the holidays, I don't say a word. I'm like a mute. I don't I don't a a word. I get up in the mornings. Okay. Everybody knows that's not true. In fact, it's just the opposite. It's the same stuff here. I'm doing the same stuff at home. Challenging people. Challenging me. Political debate. I actually love good political solid debate. It's family and friends.

PATRICK: It's entertaining.

DOC: Now, when you're out and barbecue, let's say you're at a gathering, (?) cocktail party. And you're introduced to new people. You're mingling. When they find out you're a chef, they ask you, don't they?

PATRICK: Immediately.

DOC: You know, how do you make a --

PATRICK: What's your specialty? And when I say Japanese food, it's interesting. Ah.

DOC: Oh. Because they don't know what to --

PATRICK: White guy. Japanese food. It doesn't compute.

DOC: Plus, most people don't have a go-to Japanese dish.

PATRICK: Other than sushi, they don't know any other Japanese food.

DOC: Or ramen.

PATRICK: Or boxed ramen.

DOC: I can see that. Because doctors (?) they're like, I got this right in the back -- in the shoulder blade. Can you take a --

PATRICK: You know, I have these chest pains. (?) and it's in mean arm. It's in my Czech chest.

DOC: Can you take a look at it?

PATRICK: Yeah. Quick pop (?)

DOC: Look at this. It's down the side of my leg here.

PATRICK: Does this look infected to you?

DOC: Right. You're at dinner, right? That's got to be horrible.

PATRICK: That is -- I do get captured quite often in the food conversation. But --

DOC: It's still probably pretty good. Because you're passionate about it.

PATRICK: Anybody who knows me, knows that I love food. It's been my life for almost 30 years. I love to share knowledge and my passion for the food industry. And teach people that the food -- everybody at some point NBC life, (?), well, it probably would be cool. But it's also expensive.

DOC: Uh-huh.

PATRICK: Exhausting.

DOC: Yeah. If you're worth $450 million and you start a small restaurant and you can lose $100,000 a year, it's probably pretty cool. You get to go in, mingle, you own the restaurant. But when you got to make it balance or profit, that's where it gets tricky, right?

PATRICK: It's a 24/7 business. The average margin I found out (?) the average restaurant makes 4 percent.

DOC: So traditionally, in supermarkets, I'm going way back, the margins was percent, percent and a half. 2 percent?

PATRICK: Yeah. It used to be two. (?) somewhere in the one and a half range.

DOC: At one point in broadcasting, because Telecommunications Act of 1966 said that you could earn more than radio stations that you used to -- I think at one point you could own across the country 17 or 20 or something like that. But you could only own 1:00 a.m. or FM (?) you could own. Per market. Yeah. Ravioli and that's what -- I remember when some of those sold. Some of the stations I worked at. The profit margin was imagine if I told you it was 40 percent, would you think that's pretty good?

SHAWN: Absolutely. Yeah.

DOC: They were 70 percent. (?)

PATRICK: More power to them. I'm obviously in the wrong business.

DOC: The reason why it was 70 percent -- because they didn't pay Doc Thompson. They were like, it's all right. Kid. You can eat ramen, that's fine.

PATRICK: Wait. Where's my paycheck --

DOC: That has all changed somewhat. You just get on. And it works. So we're talking a little bit about Thanksgiving and some of the other things that people search for by state. And some of them seem pretty traditional. Some of them not. Give you some of the other ones. Maybe we'll hit your state here. Indiana, peanut butter cookies. That's kind of a holiday thing. (?)

PATRICK: At least it's a cookie.

DOC: Pin wheels. That's also a cookie. That's in Kansas. Cornbread (?) dressing in Louisiana. That makes sense. Chicken potpie in Maine. Maryland, crab cakes. You know what, I think they search for that all the time in Maryland. That's not a holiday.

PATRICK: That's year around because you can get them cheap.

DOC: Cheesecake in Massachusetts.

PATRICK: And New York. And being from New York, that's pretty common.

DOC: Makes sense. Michigan is chili. Odd choice.

PATRICK: It's really cold up there.

DOC: Minnesota, green bean casserole. Does anybody else have that? That's the only one?

PATRICK: I think so.

DOC: What is chicken spaghetti in Mississippi and also Texas. Chicken spaghetti.

PATRICK: I found a few recipes for that. (?) dish. Which I think you would just substitute turkey for that. But it's made in spaghetti than turkey.

DOC: (?) oven roasted vegetables for Montana. Nevada, peanut butter cookies. New Hampshire, blueberry pie. Thank you, Kal. Blueberry pie. Although, New Hampshire (?) so maybe.

PATRICK: Yeah, it's cold.

DOC: Crab cakes in New Jersey. Pecan pie in New Mexico. Sweet potato pie (?) that's an interesting one. In both Ohio and West Virginia, buffalo chicken dip.

PATRICK: Why not?

DOC: Have you ever had that?

KAL: That stuff is awesome.

DOC: Yeah. And checking account me -- it's shredded chicken with (?)

PATRICK: Mixture of cream cheese, heavy cream, and main ace.

DOC: And it's layered in there?

PATRICK: No, you mix the whole thing (?) served on baguette or toast. Crackers. Whatever you have.

DOC: Oklahoma, pecan pie. I'm sorry. Pecan pie. Whichever. Oregon, bread stuffing. Pennsylvania, also chicken dip. That whole region, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania. Interesting. You know that he probably just found out about it. (?), yeah, we had that 30 years ago. We're like, have you tried this new thing?

PATRICK: Which is interesting. Because Ohio is typically the test region. I don't understand why. But it's the test region for new foods for the major food companies.

DOC: Yeah. Columbus, in particular. For some reason, demographically, it cuts across all of them. Midwest. But you're also east. You have older (?) just demographically, it's worked for them.

PATRICK: Well, you would think so, but no candidate has won that won the state of Iowa. So I don't understand (?)

DOC: No Ohio. Without winning Ohio. I think that's the history. Anyway --

PATRICK: So maybe you keep Ohio --

DOC: Yeah. (?) pumpkin pie. (?) sausage balls in Tennessee. Just like Alabama.

You've got crescent recipes in Utah. Crescent rolls. Butter nut soup. (?) sugar cookies in Washington. And then shrimp in Wisconsin. And Wyoming pork chops. And then I left out three states.

New Hampshire -- I'm sorry.

KAL: New Hampshire.

DOC: Appreciate you being there, even though I screwed it up. Nebraska, Rhode Island, and Iowa, all search for something that is an odd pick. Kal, have you ever had monkey bread?

KAL: Is that brain?

DOC: No. Monkey bread. Because you're thinking sweetbread.

KAL: Yes. Might as well be bread.

DOC: It's made with only part of the monkey. Not the entire monkey. You're giving me the look. It has nothing to do with monkey.

KAL: Like Rocky Mountain oysters?

PATRICK: Kind of. (?) I was a Boy Scout. Monkey balls instead of monkey bread. But it has nothing to do with monkeys. I don't know where the term came from.

KAL: What is it made of?

DOC: It's cinnamon bread.

PATRICK: Yeah, you are take any kind of a canned biscuit or Doe. You cut it into pieces. (?) and then you make a caramel mixture. So it's sugar and butter in the bottom of like -- like --

DOC: Your roasting pan?

PATRICK: Like an angel food cake pan. A buttoned cake pan. Then you put the (?) you roll them in cinnamon sugar. You put them in there. You bake it. You turn it upside down. I it has this wonderful. (?) it's actually really good.

KAL: That sounds awesome.

DOC: Yeah, it's fantastic or whatever. It seems like an odd pick -- it's not really a breakfast dish. It can be. Not as much as cinnamon rolls.

PATRICK: That you can serve (?) a lot of people with. That doesn't require a lot of preparation.

DOC: This is more, like you said, camping, or late at night, snacky thing. Maybe people are using it for all those. Maybe breakfast or even a desert then it could be used for.

PATRICK: Yeah. I suppose.

DOC: You know what, though, it's probably simple to make for a sweet dessert or whatever you're going to use it for, by comparison. (?)

PATRICK: You don't have to make a Doe.

DOC: You don't have to make the Doe --

PATRICK: It's sugar, butter, (?) those are the ingredients.

DOC: So you're already starting the Doe made. That probably works really well. That's interesting.

PATRICK: It's like the crescent recipes in the other states. Alaska and Utah.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) joined the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" to explain how mail-in ballots are typically disqualified during recounts at a far higher rate than in-person, Election Day ballots, and why this is "good news" for President Donald Trump's legal battle over the election.

"One of the things that gives the greatest cause for optimism is, this election ... there's a pretty marked disparity in terms of how the votes were distributed. On Election Day, with in-person voting, Donald Trump won a significant majority of the votes cast on in-person voting on Election Day. Of mail-in voting, Joe Biden won a significant majority of the votes cast early on mail-in voting," Cruz explained.

"Now, here's the good news: If you look historically to recounts, if you look historically to election litigation, the votes cast in person on Election Day tend to stand. It's sort of hard to screw that up. Those votes are generally legal, and they're not set aside. Mail-in votes historically have a much higher rate of rejection … when they're examined, there are a whole series of legal requirements that vary state by state, but mail-in votes consistently have a higher rate of rejection, which suggests that as these votes begin being examined and subjected to scrutiny, that you're going to see Joe Biden's vote tallies go down. That's a good thing," he added. "The challenge is, for President Trump to prevail, he's got to run the table. He's got to win, not just in one state but in several states. That makes it a lot harder to prevail in the litigation. I hope that he does so, but it is a real challenge and we shouldn't try to convince ourselves otherwise."

Watch the video clip below to catch more of the conversation:

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Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean is perhaps even more disgusted with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) for his coronavirus response than BlazeTV's Stu Burguiere (read what Stu has to say on the subject here), and for a good reason.

She lost both of her in-laws to COVID-19 in New York's nursing homes after Gov. Cuomo's infamous nursing home mandate, which Cuomo has since had scrubbed from the state's website and blamed everyone from the New York Post to nursing care workers to (every leftist's favorite scapegoat) President Donald Trump.

Janice joined Glenn and Stu on the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" Tuesday to ask why mainstream media is not holding Gov. Cuomo — who recently published a book about his leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic — accountable?

"I'm vocal because I have not seen the mainstream media ask these questions or demand accountability of their leaders. [Cuomo] really has been ruling with an iron fist, and every time he does get asked a question, he blames everybody else except the person that signed that order," Janice said.

"In my mind, he's profiting off the over 30 thousand New Yorkers, including my in-laws, that died by publishing a book on 'leadership' of New York," she added. "His order has helped kill thousands of relatives of New York state. And this is not political, Glenn. This is not about Republican or Democrat. My in-laws were registered Democrats. This is not about politics. This is about accountability for something that went wrong, and it's because of your [Cuomo's] leadership that we're put into this situation."

Watch the video excerpt from the show below:

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As America grows divided and afraid to disagree with the Democrats' woke plan for America, Megyn Kelly is ready to fight back for the truth. For nearly two decades, she navigated the volatile and broken world of the media. But as America leans on independent voices more than ever, she's breaking new ground with "The Megyn Kelly Show."

She joined the latest Glenn Beck Podcast to break down what's coming next after the election: Black Lives Matter is mainstream, leftists are making lists of Trump supporters, and the Hunter Biden scandal is on the back burner.

Megyn and Glenn reminisce about their cable news days (including her infamous run-in with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump) and to look into the chaotic and shady world of journalism and the growing entitlement it's bred. For example, many conservatives have been shocked by how Fox News handled the election.

Megyn defended Fox News, saying she believes Fox News' mission "is a good one," but also didn't hold back on hosts like Neil Cavuto, who cut off a White House briefing to fact check it — something she never would have done, even while covering President Obama.

Megyn also shared this insightful takeaway from her time at NBC: "Jane Fonda was an ass."

Watch the full podcast here:

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Glenn Beck has had enough of exposing scandal after scandal, just to have everyone look the other way: Benghazi, Hillary Clinton's emails, Joe and Hunter Biden's dealings in Ukraine and China … the list goes on, but no consequences are paid. Now, the media have called the election for Joe Biden and insist no one can question it. But for many of the more than 71 million people who voted for President Trump, our search for the truth isn't over yet.

On his Wednesday night special this week, Glenn called out the left's long list of alleged corruption that has gone unchecked and stressed that Donald Trump's legal team must be allowed to go through the process of investigating the multiple allegations of election fraud to ensure our voting systems are fair.

"I don't know about you, but I'm tired. I am worn out. I am fed up!" Glenn said during his opening monologue. "I've had enough. I am tired of exposing corruption, doing our homework, even going overseas and having documents translated to make sure they're exactly right, [and] presenting the evidence ... except, once we expose it, nothing happens. Nobody goes to jail. Nobody pays for a damn thing any more!"

Watch the short video clip from the full show below:


Because the content of this show is sure to set off the Big Tech censors, the full episode is only be available on BlazeTV. The election and its aftermath are the most important stories in America, so we're offering our most timely discount ever: $30 off a one-year subscription to BlazeTV with code "GLENN."