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Fox to air never-before-seen OJ Simpson ‘confession’

Years after it was pulled before airing, an interview with O.J. Simpson offering a “hypothetical” account of what happened the night that Nicole Brown and her friend Ronald Goldman were brutally murdered will be released.

“OJ Simpson: The Lost Confession?” is a new special that will air this week. The interview was slated to air in 2006 when Simpson was promoting his book, “If I Did It,” but both were scrapped at the time because of the public backlash.

On today’s show, Glenn, Pat and Stu watched the trailer for the new special, which will air this Sunday on Fox.

“He starts speaking hypothetically, and then all of a sudden, it turns first person, and it’s chilling when he does,” Pat described.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

PAT: I'm excited about Sunday night. Are you guys going to watch the O.J. confession?

GLENN: If I remember.

PAT: You got to remember.

GLENN: You have to call me. I won't remember.

PAT: Oh, you have to remember. It's 7 o'clock Central, so 8:00 Eastern. And this is the one done that was done, what? Ten, twelve years ago, when they wrote the book, if I did it, here's how it happened.

GLENN: Do we know why that book wasn't released?

PAT: Yeah. Because the Goldmans were pissed, and they stopped it.

STU: And they were like, hey, maybe you shouldn't be making millions of dollars off our kid's murder. So it became a controversy at the time.

PAT: So whoever did it in the first place -- I think it was Fox, wasn't it? That shelved it. So now they're bringing it back out after all this time and putting it on the air.

GLENN: And they're putting it on the air now because, eh, nobody cares about the Goldmans anymore. Is that what it is?

PAT: Yeah. It's been long enough now, I guess. So they're going to play it. And he goes through this hypothetical. And he starts speaking hypothetically. And then all of a sudden, it turns first person. And it's chilling when he does.

Because he starts talking about his friend Charlie that came over to his house. And he said to me, in the words of O.J. -- he said to me, O.J., you're not going to believe what's going on at Nicole's house. And he said, whatever is going on, it's got to stop.

GLENN: Do we have the audio of that?

PAT: We have the --

STU: The trailer.

PAT: I think we have the trailer of it.

GLENN: Play a little bit of it.

VOICE: 2006, O.J. Simpson gave a no-holds-barred interview, including his gripping account of what might have happened that fateful night. For over a decade, the tapes of that infamous interview were lost, until now.

STU: Lost.

VOICE: I'm going to tell you a story you've never heard before. It takes place the night of June 12, 1994, and it concerns the murders of my ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her young friend Ronald Goldman. Forget everything you think you know about that night. Because I know the facts better than anyone.

PAT: I bet you do.

STU: I bet he does.

VOICE: This is one story the whole world got wrong.

VOICE: Does he confess? You be the judge. O.J. Simpson. The Lost Confession. Sunday, March 11th, on Fox.

GLENN: It wasn't lost. It was sitting in some vault some place, and somebody was licking their chops going, oh, my gosh.

PAT: Is it time yet?

GLENN: Oh, my gosh. It's time now, isn't it?

STU: Now that he's out, they can actually play this, I guess. It's amazing because he does do it in the first person.

GLENN: But wasn't that the point of the book.

STU: Yes, but what a weird point. It's one of the strangest things in American history.

PAT: It is. Well, because he starts talking if it happened, here's how it might have happened. But then he switches to, I did this. And he said this to me. And it's a chilling kind of switch into first person speak, where it sounds like he's talking about what he did.

STU: Yeah.

PAT: What he actually did.

STU: Can you imagine going to someone who is accused of a crime. And his freedom is dependent on the idea that he did not commit it. And going to him and saying, hey, would you write a book, describing a hypothetical way of the way you would commit the crime you're accused of? What would possibly motivate you, other than the fact that you did do it and you believe you wanted to confess for some reason, either money or for -- to get it off your chest, but you knew you couldn't do it without going to prison. This is your way of confessing it.

GLENN: I just want to point out, it's worse than that. It is, imagine, your wife has been killed. A brutal, brutal killing. You are busy looking for the killer.

PAT: On every golf course in America.

GLENN: People think you have done it, what would possess you --

PAT: Nothing.

GLENN: You would say, that's obscene.

STU: Of course.

GLENN: If I remember, I am going to definitely watch this on Sunday night.

PAT: If you remember.

STU: Well, you might be out fixing old cars in the garage.

GLENN: Well, not fixing exactly.

STU: Sitting under them.

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: You need to put a flat screen underneath the car.

STU: I've already got one. Because the car doesn't work because I have no idea how to fix it.