Pastor Hutcherson reacts to Riley Cooper

Glenn talked to the always entertaining Pastor Ken Hutcherson on radio today about Riley Cooper and political correctness in general.

Transcript of interview is below:

GLENN: All right. Let me go to Hutch who's in Seattle. He is the pastor of the Antioch Bible Church. Pastor Hutch, how are you, sir?

HUTCHERSON: I'm doing good, Glenn. How are you doing?

GLENN: Very good. Very good. I ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I'm glad to hear that about Marcus.

GLENN: He is really doing well. It's amazing what this new therapy is able to do for some of these guys.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah, yeah. You know, he was really having problems sleeping and I think that that was one of the major ‑‑ did you hear about the first time we met?

GLENN: You and Marcus?

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: No.

HUTCHERSON: I'm ‑‑ we were going in to do this fundraiser in the Dakotas and I'm waiting for this brother named Marcus Luttrell. Ain't no white guy named Marcus Luttrell.

GLENN: (Laughing.)

HUTCHERSON: And he walks in and I'm going, what? That's Marcus? And we had ‑‑ I mean, we laughed about that the whole weekend, man. I go, a white guy named Marcus Luttrell, come on. Give me a break.

STU: (Laughing.)

GLENN: So Ken, let me ask you a couple of questions. First of all, Riley Cooper is in trouble.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah, he is. Yeah, he is.

GLENN: And, you know, he was ‑‑ you know, I can't imagine you would know what the locker rooms at the NFL, especially today, how often that word is used.

HUTCHERSON: Oh, my lands, please.

GLENN: Right?

HUTCHERSON: Absolutely.

GLENN: Okay.

HUTCHERSON: Absolutely. But it's how you use it, bro. I mean, it's how you use it, what reference you use it. Do you say it to one another as friends, as close friends; but when you get angry and derogatory and call names out, I mean, you know, for heaven sakes.

GLENN: Right.

HUTCHERSON: The boy's in trouble. And if his teammates, which I understand one I think a running back has come out now and said that he has totally lost respect for him.

GLENN: Well, I ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: So I think he's in trouble.

GLENN: So let's ‑‑ so let me ask you this, Ken. I don't use that word. I don't like that word. I wouldn't like to hear that word coming from you, but I understand that you've just used it in a ‑‑ in a sermon.

HUTCHERSON: I used it in a sermon now and in Dallas.

GLENN: You used it in a sermon.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: I'm just very uncomfortable with the word myself, but I just think we have to get over it.

HUTCHERSON: Thank you. Thank you very much. I mean, even when it comes to ‑‑ you know, we're not that ‑‑ we're not that ‑‑ we're not that conservative on black‑on‑black crime as we are blacks using the N‑word towards one another between friends. I don't understand this whole philosophy that we're going to, threatening. I mean, we'll throw someone out of the NFL for using the word, which I don't think he should be kicked out. You know, I think he should really understand what he's done and how he said it and how his teammates are and how they feel. But, you know, guys with black‑on‑black crime gets a better break.

GLENN: How about ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: ‑‑ in using that word.

GLENN: How about Paula Deen who we just chased out of the public square?

HUTCHERSON: I totally admit the best thing about Paula Deen is her hot grease.

GLENN: That's just a whole disturbing sentence there. I mean ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I mean, the TV network, my girl will be right on there and her contract will be, you'll have to cook me some fried chicken once a week.

STU: (Laughing.)

GLENN: We're sitting in a country now where we are chasing, like the guy from ESPN who said there is a chink in the armor, and they chased him out.

HUTCHERSON: Come on. It's political correctness, Glenn.

Let me ‑‑ can I throw a question at you?

GLENN: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: All right. I really love the way you said "yeah." Guys, did you hear the way Glenn said, "Yeah."

GLENN: Go ahead.

HUTCHERSON: He don't know what's coming, right?

All right. Do you think God discriminates?

GLENN: No, I don't think he discriminates. I think he judges.

HUTCHERSON: Okay. What's the difference between discriminating and judging?

GLENN: Well, we have changed the word.

HUTCHERSON: Thank you.

GLENN: There's discriminating taste.

HUTCHERSON: Thank you very much.

GLENN: Yeah, Discriminating taste.

HUTCHERSON: Discriminating is negative.

GLENN: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: You know, I think we are so cautious about what we do. Even our e‑mails discriminate. If you think I'm kidding, don't get that e‑mail correct when you're trying to talk to one another. I ran into that with you.

GLENN: What do you mean?

HUTCHERSON: E‑mails discriminate. Well, I'm sorry, bro, but you got real close. So I think I sent it through anyway. E‑mail don't work that way. God don't work that way. God just says, "Hey, I'm worse than e‑mail. You've got to get it exact for what I say. Close isn't good enough."

GLENN: Oh, I see what you're saying, that we ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: We discriminate.

GLENN: Right.

HUTCHERSON: But we don't want to admit that.

GLENN: Well ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: And I discriminate against other women compared to my wife. I discriminate against different food. I discriminate against different people. I know that's really surprising, but there are some people I don't like.

GLENN: But we are ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I love them. I don't like them.

GLENN: But we are supposed to, we're supposed to do that.

Pat, this is one of the oldest arguments that Pat and I have had with people and that is we are ‑‑ discriminating tastes used to be a good thing.

PAT: Mmm‑hmmm.

HUTCHERSON: Yes.

GLENN: We are supposed to say I don't want that kind of ‑‑ and I do. Let's go back to the N‑word. I don't want that word used around me. I don't like that word. Now, if you choose to use it, that's fine, but you better have a damn good reason for using it and, you know, in your particular sermon, I looked at it.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: And I think it was exactly the right word to use coming from you. But I couldn't use that word.

HUTCHERSON: You know, you look at Jesus saying, and calling that woman a dog in Matthew 15. And today we don't understand the derogatory putdown that Jesus said to that woman. It is one of the worst things you could say back in the day. And he says it to a woman. But he got his point over because of the caliber of the decision that she had to make whether she was going to walk away from it or she was going to trust him to the end to get her daughter saved. And today we are so afraid to discriminate to someone that has a greater score to someone in a game. We want everyone to be a winner. Everyone is not a winner!

GLENN: Okay. So let me take you here and see if you can answer this.

HUTCHERSON: Sure.

GLENN: We were in our morning meeting today and we were talking about Detroit. And Stu, what are the stats on black versus white on bailout with Detroit? Do you have them handy?

STU: I don't have them handy, no.

GLENN: Well, generally speaking, generally speaking whites are against the bailout and blacks are for the bailout.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: Now, I don't know if that was the same for GM or not, but it is for Detroit.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: Now, I was against the GM bailout.

HUTCHERSON: Me too.

GLENN: I'm against the Detroit bailout.

HUTCHERSON: Me ‑‑ I'm right with you, right with you.

GLENN: But they are going to make this about race, that we don't care about Detroit because of race. I don't care if it's California. I don't care if it's Scandinavia. We don't bail people out.

So how do we break that cycle? Because you're getting free stuff.

HUTCHERSON: You know how we break that cycle, Glenn? We vote in good people.

GLENN: I tried that.

HUTCHERSON: We've got to vote in people, man, that's not afraid to do what's right instead of being liked. It's the same thing with radio hosts. It's the same thing with pastors. It's the same thing with our Republicans, our Democrats, our, you know, independents. I don't care what it is. We've got to have people that's going to start having guts enough to vote what's right in this state.

GLENN: I have to tell you ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I'm writing you a letter right now for TheBlaze, what I would do if I was president. It's going to make some people really mad.

GLENN: Are you? You write it; I'll publish it. Ken, here's the problem. The ‑‑ I think that you're at the last stop. You're at, let's vote good people in. I think the people don't even know how to judge good and bad people anymore, and most people ‑‑ I mean, you've got to start at the pulpit, you have to start at the head of the households. Am I a good person? Have I done the right thing? Do I even know the difference between right or wrong? Am I holding myself to a higher standard?

HUTCHERSON: Individual responsibility starts it off, absolutely correct. That's why one of the first things I would do is I would ‑‑ if I was president, brother, I would take the 90‑week ‑‑ listen to me ‑‑ the 90‑week unemployment benefit, I would cut it to six weeks, and you can't get back on.

GLENN: You would not be popular.

HUTCHERSON: Any woman outside of wedlock that has two babies that's not married, as the government I will only help her on the first one. After that ‑‑ you know, anybody can make a mistake, Glenn. We know that. Anyone can make a mistake. I will help her on that first one. But the second, third and fourth and fifth baby that she has outside of wedlock is not a mistake. That's a lifestyle. And I will not support that lifestyle.

GLENN: Yeah, but then you would just increase the number of abortions.

HUTCHERSON: No, sir. Because I am going to get all ‑‑ I'm going to make sure that all that support we're going to Planned Parenthood and all those things, I'm going to get some good legislation going and we're going to quit paying all that money to Planned Parenthood to help people get abortions.

GLENN: Why do you hate black people so much, Ken?

HUTCHERSON: I love black people. I be one, you know.

GLENN: Pastor Ken Hutcherson, good to have you on and we'll see you soon.

HUTCHERSON: My pleasure, what you had

GLENN: Wait, wait, Ken, are you there? Shoot of the I wanted to ask him about the brown bag thing.

HUTCHERSON: What's that?

GLENN: I wanted to ask you about, because you're in Seattle, I wanted to ask you, how offended are you when somebody says we're going to brown bag it today? Because the City of ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I ask them what's in the bag; can I have some.

GLENN: The City of Seattle says they're going to ‑‑ they're banning the use of the word, the words "brown bag."

HUTCHERSON: Brown bag, come on. You know, there's several of them that TSA can't use out here. Man, we're so liberal out here, I love it because I'm not ever going to run out of people I can deal with. I'm going to always have a job out here in Seattle.

GLENN: Thanks a lot, Ken. Talk to you later.

HUTCHERSON: Thanks, bro.

Michigan barber Karl Manke isn't a troublemaker. He's a law-abiding citizen who did everything possible to financially survive during the COVID-19 lockdown. pandemic. Eventually, he had no other option: he had to reopen his business in defiance of Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's stay-at-home orders.

In an interview on the "Glenn Beck Radio Program," Manke, 77, told Glenn, "I'm not backing down" despite Whitmer's seemingly vindictive attempts to shut down his business.

Shortly after reopening, Manke was ticketed for violating Whitmer's stay-at-home order and charged with a misdemeanor. When he still refused to close his doors, the governor's office went a step further and suspended his barber license.

"It's kind of a vindictive thing," said Manke. "I've become a worm in her brain ... and she is going full force, illegally, when legislatures told her that she was out of place and this was not her assignment, she decided to take it anyway."

On Thursday, the Shiawassee County Circuit Judge refused to issue a preliminary injunction against Manke. Read more on this update here.

Watch the video clip from the interview below:

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Time after time, Americans have taken to the streets to defend our constitutional rights, whether it was our livelihood at stake -- or our lives. But, what was the point of all the civil rights movements that came before, if we're about to let the government take our rights away now?

On his Wednesday night special, Glenn Beck argued that Americans are tired of having our rights trampled by "tyrannical" leaders from state and local governments who are ignoring our unalienable rights during this pandemic.

"Our nanny state has gone too far. The men and women in office -- the ones closest to our communities, our towns, our cities -- are now taking advantage of our fear," Glenn said. "Like our brothers and sisters of the past, we need to start making the decisions that will put our destiny, and our children's destiny, back into our hands."

It took less than two months of the coronavirus tyranny to make America unrecognizable, but some Americans are fighting back, risking losing their jobs and businesses or even jail time, as they battle to take back our civil rights.

Here are just a few of their stories:

After New Jersey's Atilis Gym reopened in defiance of the governor's executive order, the Department of Health shut them down for "posing a threat to the public health." Co-owner Ian Smith says somebody sabotaged the gym's toilets with enire rolls of paper to create the public health "threat."

Oregon Salon owner, Lindsey Graham, was fined $14 thousand for reopening. She said she was visited by numerous government organizations, including Child Protective Services, in what she believes are bullying tactics straight from the governor's office.

77-year-old Michigan barber, Karl Manke, refused to close his shop even when facing arrest. "I couldn't go another 30 days without an income," he said. But when local police refused to arrest him, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's (D) office suspending his business license instead.

Port of Seattle police officer Greg Anderson was suspended after he spoke out against enforcing what he called "tyrannical orders" imposed amid coronavirus lockdowns.

Kentucky mother-of-seven, Mary Sabbatino, found herself under investigation for alleged child abuse after breaking social distancing rules at a bank. After a social worker from child protective services determined there was no sign of abuse, he still sought to investigate why the Sabbatino's are homeschooling, and how they can give "adequate attention to that many children."

Dallas salon owner Shelley Luther was sentenced to seven days in jail after she defied the state-mandated stay-at-home orders to reopen her business.

Watch the video clip from Glenn's special below:


Watch the full special on BlazeTV YouTube here.

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It took less than two months of the coronavirus tyranny to make America unrecognizable. Leaders from state and local governments across the U.S. have flattened the curve of some of our most basic constitutional rights, but some Americans are fighting back — and risking jail time or losing their businesses.

On Wednesday night's GBTV special, Glenn Beck argued that we're witnessing the birth of a new civil rights movement — and it's time to build a coalition of common sense to keep America as we know it free.

Watch the full special below:

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On the radio program Thursday, Glenn Beck sat down with chief researcher Jason Buttrill to go over two bombshell developments that have recently come to light regarding former Vice President Joe Biden's role in the 2016 dismissal of Ukrainian Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin.

"Wow! Two huge stories dropped within about 24 hours of each other," Jason began. He went on to explain that a court ruling in Ukraine has just prompted an "actual criminal investigation against Joe Biden in Ukraine."

This stunning development coincided with the release of leaked phone conversations, which took place in late 2015 and early 2016, allegedly among then-Vice President Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Ukraine's former President Petro Poroshenko.

One of the audiotapes seems to confirm allegations of a quid pro quo between Biden and Poroshenko, with the later admitting that he asked Shokin to resign despite having no evidence of him "doing anything wrong" in exchange for a $1 billion loan guarantee.

"Poroshenko said, 'despite the fact that we didn't have any corruption charges on [Shokin], and we don't have any information about him doing something wrong, I asked him to resign,'" Jason explained. "But none of the Western media is pointing this out."

Watch the video below for more details:


Listen to the released audiotapes in full here.

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To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multiplatform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.