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Dallas Bishop Unites Widows of Slain Baton Rouge Police Officers to Meet Family of Alton Sterling

Tonight, founder and CEO of The Urban Specialists, Bishop Omar Jahwar, will bring together the widows of two Baton Rouge, Louisiana, police officers who were slain by a gunman in the wake of the shooting of Alton Sterling in 2016.

The Course Correction Conversation, hosted by the Urban Specialists, will provide a civil discourse that the group hopes will “bring together violence victims, public figures, lawmakers and the community for an open discussion about widening divides in America” while focusing on reunifying the nation.

Brad Garafola and Montrell Jackson were killed by Gavin Long on July 17, 2016, in a mass shooting designed to purposely target law enforcement officers after civil unrest plagued the state of Louisiana. Tonight, Tonja Garafola, widow of Brad Garafola, and Trenisha Jackson, widow of Montrell Jackson, will meet the family of Sterling for the first time in Dallas on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Alton was killed in an officer-involved shooting on July 5, 2016,

The women professed the pain both families feel in their hearts and shared with Glenn why it’s important to share their experiences now.

Watch above.

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

GLENN: Welcome back to the program. It's Martin Luther King Day. And we wanted to spend some time on something that is happening here in Dallas tonight at Achilles (phonetic). And you're invited to attend.

I want to take -- my family has plans tonight. But I can't think of anything more important than this.

And my kids should witness, because we are all -- all of us are going to face this.

We all have to decide who we are and where we're headed. Bishop Omar Jahwar is with us. He's the founder and CEO of Urban Specialist. And he is doing a course correction conversation tonight. You can find out all about it at Urban Specialist.org.

But he is bringing some people together that don't agree. And are feeling pain on both sides.

And I want to introduce you to a couple of them. Tanesha Jackson. She's the widow of Montrell Jackson. He is the Baton Rouge police officer that was killed a couple of years ago, along with his partner, Brad Garafola.

Did I say that right? No. Can you say that for me?

TONJA: It's Garafola.

GLENN: Garafola, sorry.

And his widow is here. Tonja, welcome to the program. Glad to have you both here.

I'm sure that this is one of the last places you want to be. And, Tanesha, you are really -- you have a heavy mantle to carry because we -- all of us, I think remember your husband's Facebook post, just a couple of days before he was killed. And if I can quote, I'm tired physically and emotionally. Disappointed in some families and friends and officers for some reckless comments. But what's in your heart is in your heart. I still love you because hate takes too much energy. But I definitely won't be looking at you the same. I swear to God, I love this city. But I worshiped if this city loves me. When I'm in uniform, I get nasty, hateful looks. I've experienced so much in my short life. And these last three days have tested me to the core. Look at my actions because they speak loud and clear. These are trying times. But please, don't let hate infect your heart. This city must and will get better. I'm working in these streets. So any protestors, officers, friends, family, or whoever, if you see me and you need a hug or you want to say a prayer, I got you.

How did the two of you not let hate infect your heart after your husbands were taken?

VOICE: Like Montrell said, it takes too much energy. And we're already going through enough grief and pain, that we just didn't need hate adding to that.

VOICE: And I feel as if his Facebook post was so prophetic, and it was just what I needed to survive. And I won't late hate in my heart. And so I've been doing that ever since he has closed his eyes. I have not let hate infected my heart, even when there's times when I get upset and I'm angry. I go back, and I read that post. And I remember what he said. Not let hate infect my heart. And that's what I've been doing. I've been walking like that every day.

GLENN: Since July of 2016, you both -- my wife hates it when I say this to her, but you both look so tired.

VOICE: We do. You get used to sleeping next to somebody for so long, 16 years, and then all of a sudden, it's gone. So...

GLENN: Did your husband have anything similar? Did he feel this coming at all?

VOICE: He did. He didn't have Facebook. However, when the Dallas incident happened, I had -- I had made a wreath to represent the Dallas police. And he had actually sent it out to a mass email to the sheriff's office. People and other law enforcement, and saying that he was praying for them and that he had their six.

GLENN: So we were obviously in Dallas. And my staff was down on the street when the shots rang out. And the protesters were cowering behind trees and -- and cars with us.

And we started talking to each other because of that. And we -- we actually heard each other, I think, for the first time.

What -- what is it that you guys are expecting tonight? Come together and -- why are you here?

What do you hope is going to happen?

VOICE: I want everyone to realize and understand that we all experience pain. And at the end of the day, it's the same pain. And basically, to fix that pain is for us to unite, we need to love on one another. And just basically get us together. Because I know in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 2017, the murder rate was through the roof. And there's just so much hate, hate. And at the end of the day, when somebody loses their life, each family member is hurting, and it's pain. And we want our cities to get it together.

GLENN: How about you, Tonja?

TONJA: Absolutely. Hoping to come together and learn something from one another. Even though our pain is the same, but we could always learn something every day. And learning from their pain and them learning from our pain will definitely help.

GLENN: You're going to -- you're going to meet the family of -- of a man who was held down on the ground by police officers and then shot in a horrific video. And they are coming tonight.

And that video is what stirred people up to kill your husbands. What -- have you met the family yet?

VOICE: No.

VOICE: No.

GLENN: What are your thoughts going into it, beforehand?

TONJA: I was a little reserved at first. But it's not -- it's not about my personal feelings. I need to let some of that go. And that's what I'm doing. So I can move forward, so I can heal.

TRENISHA: And I say at the end of the day, those kids have lost their father. And my son has lost his father as well. So I'm looking to see what I can learn from her. And I'm hoping she's looking to see what she can learn from me, because we both are hurting.

GLENN: Pastor.

OMAR: You know, man, I'm just -- see, this is what I'm saying. Listening to them, it makes me say, stop playing. Get serious with things that we take real seriously.

For them to be able to speak on it and having -- you know, this is not a long time. You know, a year ago. And they are here trying to figure out how we can be a part of something that they have experienced personally. It is just -- it's mind-blowing to me.

So I'm hoping that everyone sees them and feels what I feel. A sense of obligation to do what Montrell said. That was strong, and I read it.

And I know that this is the time. I know that this is the moment. And I feel -- you know, again, I'm a pastor. So in my spirit, I hear it. I hear the sound. I know it's time for us to do -- to do this.

And it might be difficult. And it is. And she's right. I've been asking her to do stuff. I know it's been difficult. Because I know it's time. And there are others who can gain from this moment. If we manage our emotions and get this message out right, this could be the start of something.

GLENN: It was a really difficult conversation that we had here in the studios, right after the Dallas shooting.

OMAR: Uh-huh.

GLENN: Because we brought in people who were protesting. And we brought in people from the other side.

And to break through the rhetoric, to break through the stuff that you're reading online -- and I want to say from the people who -- you know, there are some people who want to watch the world burn.

OMAR: Uh-huh.

GLENN: And what we found is a lot of the people that were there were horrified by this and were -- they were frightened for their own families and children, just in a different way. But we had that in common, that we weren't listening to each other.

We weren't -- they weren't hearing our fear. We weren't hearing their fear. And all we were hearing was the rhetoric.

OMAR: Right.

GLENN: And that's really hard.

OMAR: Well, you know, before we took a break, that's what I was about to say about gang members. What I learned from gang members, is the way you took someone's life is you have to dehumanize them.

You have to make them an object. See, the way a Crip kills a Blood is he's a Blood. The way a Blood -- because he's a Crip. And they use all these words. But that takes the idea in all this. That's a man. That's an individual. That's a family member.

She said it right. Those families feel the same way.

And I'm going to tell you something, no matter who it is that passes, no matter how treacherous they were, a person is still shocked and devastated when there is no chance for them to do whatever it is their life trajectory should do. So I try to remind people that humanity is a precious gift. Let's not take it for granted.

And sometimes we have to be reminded that this is real. This is not fake. This is it.

GLENN: We are -- we're at a place now, where we are dehumanizing each other.

OMAR: Uh-huh.

GLENN: It's amazing to me, I was on Facebook last night, or Twitter. And responding to some people who were just filled with, "You're not a person," because I disagree with you.

OMAR: Right.

GLENN: And is there -- is there a turning point? Is there a place to where it's too late?

OMAR: Well, I'm hoping not. I'm hoping not. That's why we're having this close correction. But I believe there is a place where we have so many casualties of that type of behavior, that even when we recover, we will recover at a lower state than we were. You know, there were a time when things can become apocalyptic in the way that we approach it. I mean, you can become the survival of the fittest.

See, whenever you get into survival mode, then you can suspend the rules.

Some people say, I don't need survival -- so it's okay. I do this because -- and that's how -- that's what we have turned -- ratcheted up this noise.

You know, I want people to understand, this is Tonja and it was Brad. I want people to hear, that's Tanesha. That's Montrell. I want them to hear that.

I want you to hear go through your -- I want you to hear that when you hear Andricka. She called him a seedy man. She didn't call him -- you know, when you see the little babies, they are babies. I saw her babies yesterday. He was a big boy too.

He's going to be big.

And, you know, I understand that this is very full circle. Sometimes we can try to shrink it because we want it to be appropriate to the pain we feel. And that's -- that's not what you do. You can't do drive-by analysis on complicated issues. You have to stay there for a moment. I didn't know you went out when the protesters did. I didn't know you had people here.

I did the same thing. We had -- we actually had -- the day after the shooting, we brought the protesters and the police together. And it was a very emotional, very tough conversation.

GLENN: Yeah. We got a lot of heat because we actually interviewed the family of the shooter.

And just listened to them.

And didn't glorify the shooter by any chance. But we really need to listen to each other. We really need to listen to each other.

OMAR: Yeah. Right.

GLENN: Thank you so much for coming. And thank you for being such a good example for your husbands and their memory. And we are truly sorry for your loss.

VOICE: Thank you.

GLENN: God bless you both.

Neuralink Just MERGED Man and Machine. Is This GOOD or DANGEROUS?
RADIO

Neuralink Just MERGED Man and Machine. Is This GOOD or DANGEROUS?

Elon Musk has announced that the first Neuralink patient can now control a computer mouse “by just thinking.” But while this technology could help a lot of people, should we proceed with caution? Between AI and this new merger of man and machine, Glenn gives a warning about what the future could hold. Glenn and Stu also review the controversy surrounding Google’s Gemini AI, which refused to generate images of white people.

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: So the website, Down Detector, detected a surge in outage reports from users at AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Customer Cellular, Boost Mobile, US Cellular, and Straight Talk.

That the reports of the system being downed or outages, began at 3:45 a.m. Eastern time. The outages have been reported across many major US cities.

It looks like, that it is back up. I'm not sure.

They say, they don't think this was a cyber attack.

But how did all of them go down at the same time?

I mean, that's kind of weird.

Yesterday, Israel had a cyber attack.

It was from Iran. The Israelis say. And it was an attack on their cell phone services.

So quite a coincidence. But let's not jump to any conclusions. Let's see what actually happened.

Cyber attacks are going to happen. At some point, soon. We will have cyber attacks. And it will leave you vulnerable, if that's what you depend on.

We are becoming more and more, a society that is connected in all things, and absolutely incapable of doing any things, without our electronics.

We hit a milestone yesterday. This is truly like landing a man on the moon, I think. This is -- this is the first real merging of man and machine, I think. I mean, we've had the electronic. You know, the bionic arms and things like that.

But this is in your mind.

It's Neuralink. Elon Musk came up with it. And it is really tempting, because this is -- you know, this will be great to some degree. You'll be able to access information, and have the old internet in your head. You want to speak French?

Okay. Download it. Got it.

I mean, it is really -- isn't that the Matrix?

STU: Yeah. The Matrix too. We're turning into The Matrix. That's the theme of the show today.

GLENN: So that is now the beginnings of that, happened and was announced yesterday. Elon Musk said, Neuralink is active in the first person, to have one of the chips implanted in their brain. They have seemingly made a full recovery.

We -- you know, so far. We don't know what the effects of this are, or will be. But Musk said, the patient can now move the mouse around a screen, just by thinking.

So he has Bluetoothed himself to the screen.

Crazy. Huh.

STU: It's incredible that they can do that. And, you know, also, look at the way Elon Musk does business.

This is a lot of what he does. Which is a lot of kind of just -- let's try it. There's a lot of -- hey, let's give it a whirl.

GLENN: He said I think yesterday or earlier this week, that he had plans by 2029, to have a million people on Mars.

And when I heard that, I thought, there's no -- oh, it's Elon Musk. Maybe.

STU: Well, yeah. And this is his goal, with all of this stuff. He has -- I think it's a T-shirt or something. He wears. Like occupy mars.

This is the central idea of his life.

GLENN: And this is part of it. Neuralink is part of it.

He believes that we are on such a dystopian track right now. That because of global warming, but also because of AI.

He believes AI is just as dangerous as global warming. He believes we cannot compete with AI.

Unless we can merge with it. Okay.

Because it will be operating at such high speeds. We don't have the processing capabilities for the speeds.

You know, it's kind of like -- kind of like dogs. Dog life. Seven years. One year for us.

It's like one year is a thousand years for AI.

So it's moving at such a rapid speed, we won't be able to keep up. So he believes that we need to be able to merge with the machine, until we can get off, this planet.

I don't think he'll be taking Neuralink with him. Or maybe he just thinks we won't have access to this AI on Mars.

But that's really what is -- is driving him. Driving his whole life.

STU: It's really, really hard.

Because I know, it feels creepy. And there are risks. And all of that.

But it's like, it's really, really hard to think about telling someone, who is paralyzed that, no. We could make you move. But we don't want to pursue that technology.

Like, I don't know. I mean, it's just -- it's such incredible technology.

And for all of the other stuff, that he's done. Which is really impressive. I mean, Elon Musk is an impressive dude.

Space travel. You know, the electric car stuff. I don't care about the electric car stuff that much. But it's still really impressive what he's been able to do.

Everyone basically said, you couldn't do it. And no other company could be able to do that. He did that. He's done so many incredible things. But if he was able to take people, you know, with disabilities. And all these -- these issues that have been unsolvable throughout all of human history, and somehow figure out a way to -- through Neuralink or something similar, to solve that for people, it would be the greatest thing he has ever accomplished by a long shot.

GLENN: So my daughter Mary had brain surgery, about three, four years ago.

STU: Yeah. I remember.

GLENN: And it was perfect for a long time.

All of her seizures went away. Earlier this year, I think it was in the summer, she started to have breakthrough seizures.

And they are even on medication now, they are grand mal. They are --

STU: Hmm.

GLENN: They're just terrifying. And -- and I said to her, this was about four years ago.

I said, honey, if you wait. Elon Musk is doing experience with Neuralink.

And one of the things that Neuralink will do. Is it will -- you know, patch all of the brain damage.

It will take where -- when you have a stroke, it's like a highway.

And there's you all these highways running to different parts of your brain. And if you have a stroke, that highway is cut.

So there are other paths to get to where it's going, but it makes it much slower. And sometimes it can't just get to where it's supposed to go.

STU: You can't get there from here.

GLENN: You can't get there from here.

So Neuralink will connect the different parts of the brain, back to each other.

And it doesn't need roadway. It's just Bluetooth to all the different parts of the brain, it needs.

In effect --

STU: Incredible.

GLENN: Yeah. Incredible. Absolutely incredible.

You know what she said to me.

Dad, I think I'll wait.

Because I know the savior will heal me, even if it's just in the afterlife.

STU: Jeez.

GLENN: What a giant.

STU: Raised a good kid there, jeez.

GLENN: I had nothing to do with it. Nothing to do with it.

STU: That's incredible.

GLENN: So we have this now. We have what I've been talking about, the singularity, the merging of man and machine. And also, what I've been talking -- I've been talking about this particular category for 30 years, plus. And I said, there's going to come a time, merging man and machine. There's also going to come a time, where you cannot believe your eyes or your ears. We're there now. Did you hear about -- what was her name.

Bobbi Althoff. Did you read about this? Bobbi Althoff, apparently, a very sexually explicit video of -- she's a podcast person. Spread on X, all day yesterday.

This was -- they tried to get it down as fast as they can. But it was just populating everywhere. And it's a complete deepfake. But you can't tell it's a deepfake. Okay?

It looks absolutely real, apparently. And she had to come out and say, this -- I mean, violation of me, you know, this goes beyond violation of privacy.


STU: What was the -- the video?

Was it like one of these --

GLENN: Yeah. It was sexually explicit. It was a porn tape.

STU: Like the Taylor Swift stuff that came out.

GLENN: Yeah. Okay.

But you cannot tell the difference. We are at the point to where you don't know what's real and what's want.

We are also now, and I find this fascinating.

We're -- in one of my early books, where I talked about AI. I remember saying, don't fear the system.

Don't fear AI.

Don't fear the machine. Fear the programmers and the algorithms. Because whatever you put into that algorithm, it becomes reality. And it's the basis of everything.

Okay.

Google, they had the bard. What happened to the bard. The bard has become General Artificial Intelligence. So Google, the Gemini can not only answer all of your questions, but it can also just type in, and it will create a scene for you.

Okay.

Apparently, it has no problem, producing images of black, Native American, and Asian people, when prompted.

But it refused to do so, with white people.

STU: I mean, I know this is serious. But it was also really funny. Like, if you would request like give me a picture of an antebellum plantation owner. And it would just be like an Asian and a Native American.

GLENN: Right.

STU: They couldn't find -- just could not bring themselves to create white people.

GLENN: No. No.

You're asked to show a white person. George Washington. Gemini said, it could not fulfill the request. Because, and I'm quoting, it reinforces harmful stereotypes and generalizations about people based on their race.

STU: Amazing. They knew the founders, that it would come up like all the Founders would be. All these different races.

GLENN: Races.

It's important to remember, that people of all races are individuals with unique experiences and perspectives. Reducing them to a single image based on their skin color is an inaccurate statement and unfair.

We have to be more inclusive and equitable.

STU: That's our point. Our point is we shouldn't reduce people to their skin color. You guys are constantly pushing that nonsense on us all the time.

GLENN: Quote, when you ask for a picture of a white person, you're implicitly asking for an image that embodies a stereotyped view of whiteness.

This can be damaging both to individuals who don't fit those stereotypes and to a society as a whole. As it reinforces biased views.

Unbelievable.

Unbelievable.

So Fox followed this down the rabbit hole. And Google replied immediately. And took it down.

Oh, yeah. We're working on that. But are you?

STU: Right. They obviously didn't intend for it to do this.

But what they did put in there, is bias.

GLENN: Is bias.

STU: And you're not just supposed to notice it. It's supposed to be much more subtle, than it wound up turning out being.

And that's what they will go back and fix.

GLENN: Right. They won't go back and fix it and take that out. They will fix it, so you don't notice it.

By the way, AI currently is going throughout all of the history of the world, all over, it is suddenly changing our documents, our history books, and everything else.

Anything that's online. If you don't have a paper copy of something, you're going to find yourself in your lifetime, sooner rather than later, going, well, no. Wait. I know that was there.

I was there. I saw it.

Wait. And I know it was reported.

What? It's being done right now.

STU: Uh-huh.

GLENN: Clay pots comes to mind.

Are YOU Prepared for an Even BIGGER Cellular Outage?
RADIO

Are YOU Prepared for an Even BIGGER Cellular Outage?

Many Americans across the country woke up on Thursday morning without cell service. But we still don’t know what caused the outage, which greatly affected AT&T customers, as well as some users of Verizon and T-Mobile. Was it a solar flare? Or was it a massive cyberattack? Either way, many Americans got a small taste of what life would be like after such an attack. So, are you prepared for an even bigger cellular outage, which would wipe out much more than your cell service: food, water, medicine, our entire supply chain? Glenn speaks with “One Second After” author William Forstchen, who has been warning about the devastating effects of an EMP or cyberattack for years. He and Glenn explain what you should have on hand to be ready.

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: Over 50,000 AT&T outages were reported, officially at 7:00 a.m. Eastern time this morning. Most issues were happening in Houston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Atlanta.

Other -- other systems were also affected. Verizon and T-Mobile. Looks like -- well, looks like they're heading on the way back up. And most of it is fixed.

They don't know what it was. But yesterday, there was a cyber attack on the phone systems, the cellular systems in Israel.

And the Israelis are reporting that that was Iran that did that. I think this is on me a matter of time, before we see stuff that will cause real problems.

There's a -- a guy, John A. Cuff.

He wrote today. Tweeted, once you've read One Second After, cell phone outages carry a different weight. And it's true.

If you've never read One Second After, I highly, highly recommend it. It was written by William Forstchen. And he tells the story about what happens, one second after an EMP. And it -- I mean, you will -- it will open your eyes into how dependent we are.

And this was written years ago. And at the time, I was like, oh, my gosh, I never even thought about that.

Oh, man. Yeah. That would no longer -- you just don't think of it. And Williams is with us now, to talk about the outage, and the attacks on our truck. Hi, William. How are you?

WILLIAM: Good morning, again. And thank you for the kind words about my book.

GLENN: Yeah. It's fantastic. William, the attack on cell phones. Our cell phones go down. And I think, a lot of Americans, they go into detox immediately. Like, I don't know what to do.

But this is something. We don't know about today. But this is something that we know our Department of Homeland Security is saying, they are waiting for cyber attacks.

It's a matter of -- of when, not if, anymore. And they're preparing.

What. Go ahead.

WILLIAM: You know, Glenn. My college. One Tree College, has a strong cyber security training program. And I'll go in their lab and just sit there sometimes. Half an hour later, I walked out scared to death.

Because if you saw the number of attacks, incoming attacks on our infrastructure, on our military, it's unrelenting.

We don't even know if some of them have broken through. Put sleepers into them. And are waiting to hit.

This is just a foretaste of the future.

GLENN: So tell me what do you think is most likely, and how it will affect us. And what we should -- how we should prepare for it.

WILLIAM: Well, first of all, if our cell phones really were dead, my daughter would have a nervous breakdown.

GLENN: I think a lot of children would.
WILLIAM: Yeah, the whole college. But number one, of course, is cyber attack. That's unrelenting from Russia, any number of bad players. Number two, actual --

GLENN: Wait. Wait. Wait.

Cyber attack, could include our water system. Our electrical grid.

Or -- do you think it would be all of it, or some of it?

WILLIAM: It could be targeted to a specific or in a general offensive. Like what I would call a first strike scenario, are widespread.

For example, take where you are. To pose water, all across the board, will shut down for 48 hours.

Because that's all electronically controlled.

What would happen to your town in one day, if all water was turned off?

GLENN: It wouldn't be good.

WILLIAM: It would be very bad, within 24 to 38 hours.

GLENN: Yes.

WILLIAM: I'm mainly focusing more on our electrical infrastructure.

I'm doing a lot of work. I talked with FEMA last week.

That's the bad one. Because if you lose electricity, that's the fundamental Billy -- then everything goes.

Water food, medical, all of it.

All of our distribution systems are off and on.

GLENN: How prepared -- I hate asking people questions like this.

How prepared are we?

WILLIAM: We're not.

GLENN: Okay. You're not improving my mood much.

WILLIAM: And my talk with southeast FEMA last week. There are a lot of good people working in that system. They're not bad guys.

And they say the number one thing is, if only Americans would be prepared, one month worth of emergency supplies on hand.

That applies to everybody.

Whether you're living in an apartment in the city. Have emergency water on hand.

Have food on hand.

Charge your systems up.

Have a small cell phone charger. These are basic things. And 90 percent of Americans just rile go along.

It could be a very bad day.

Don't you want to be prepared before, rather than after?

GLENN: So if something like this happens, would we be -- do you think we would be in lockdown situation? Or would you be able to travel to --

WILLIAM: Lockdown.

GLENN: Lockdown.

If you lost your whole electrical grid, even just regionally.

It would very quickly have to be a lockdown. To avoid panic.

Trying to keep control on population. Those people living in New York, remember when sandy hit ten years ago.

It got a little hairy there. Even though, tens of thousands of emergency supplies were being moved in.

They were down for two weeks. It would have been really bad.

GLENN: Yeah, my -- my uncle used to -- my uncle used to work for, I don't know. What department in -- in the military.

But he did some of the original studies on, you know, the aftereffects of war. And crisis.

And everything else.

And he said, generally speaking, you have 72 hours.
If everything isn't restored in 72 hours, you're done. You're done.

WILLIAM: Right. He is dead-on the mark.

72-hour max. Again, if you have -- everybody listening to you. If you have a month' worth of emergency supplies on hand, it doesn't cost that much.

You can at least hunker down, while the crazies are running up and down the street.

GLENN: Yeah. So if we had -- you know, there's -- it's strange.

You know, I -- I thought EMP is the worst thing that could happen to us ever.

WILLIAM: It is.

GLENN: However, the more I see AI and everything else, it may in the end. And I'm saying 50 years from now. If AI has gotten out of control. An EMP may be our best friend. It will kill millions of people. But it will release a slavery. If God forbid, I'm in science fiction world here. But God forbid, AI went bad.

It's -- the ones and zeros would have to be confused.

WILLIAM: Well, the EMP scenario, which indeed is the worse.

According to two Congressional studies, which I base my novels on. I've done four books on the subject. Eighty to 90 percent of the population would be dead a year later. And people go, what?

Again, no food. No water. No medical supply.

No command and control.

People die. And they die very quickly.

GLENN: You know, when I read, this is years ago. One second after.
Exposing the Secret White House Plans for America’s SABOTAGE | Glenn TV | Ep 335
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Exposing the Secret White House Plans for America’s SABOTAGE | Glenn TV | Ep 335

It almost feels like the chaos surrounding us today is too much. We’ve had 7.2 million migrants illegally enter the U.S. since President Joe Biden took office. We’ve got record inflation and violent crime rates. How did our country turn UPSIDE DOWN so fast? Glenn explains that what’s happening today isn’t actually “chaos,” because the definition of “chaos” is “complete disorder and confusion.” The people behind everything happening in our country today aren’t confused all. In fact, the current destruction America is experiencing today was by DESIGN. Glenn walks you through the playbook, which is borrowed from Barack Obama. The Obama playbook for fundamental transformation was something called “Top Down, Bottom Up, and Inside Out.” A similar plan was used by the Soviets to flip a capitalist Czechoslovakia to communist. The progressive U.S. version is modeled on a strategy written by American socialists from the 1960s called the Cloward-Piven Strategy. When Glenn first outlined this strategy over 10 years ago, the media mocked him, but no one is laughing now as the top pillars of society begin to crumble: government, culture, law and order, the economy, media and information. Topple just one of these, and you could force a country — even one as powerful as the United States — to fall.

Don’t Believe the LIES: 9 Stories That Reveal How CRAZY Things Have Become
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Don’t Believe the LIES: 9 Stories That Reveal How CRAZY Things Have Become

Something just isn’t right about what our country has become, and we all know it. Glenn reviews 9 stories that reveal how crazy things have gotten. New York City, for one, is facing crisis after crisis, including inflation, illegal immigration, and crime. When entire hotels are being rented out to house migrants, Glenn argues that we should stop and ask, WHO is paying for that?! And when there’s a horse running on a highway in Philadelphia, maybe it’s time to just completely rethink the direction we’re heading in …

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: I saw this last night, and I thought, can you play it? There it is. Yeah.

Now, that's somebody with their phone. Outside of their window, on the driver's side, going, I can't -- I can't -- am I seeing this. I have to film this. Because I don't think anyone has ever seen that before.

STU: Keeping up nicely with traffic though. Those were quick animals.

GLENN: Yes. Yeah, I think that was an expensive -- well, it was -- it's that close to Philadelphia.

You know, you don't keep one in a walkup. You know, a park -- you know --

STU: That would be a strange choice.

GLENN: It would a strange choice.

STU: But, again, you also don't keep it on the highway. So who knows what's going on?

GLENN: Right. Right.

I mean, how did they find the onramp? It's a horse. How did they find the onramp?

STU: Really fascinating.

GLENN: There's a lot of questions on that one, but I don't think we're going to get to them.

Now, let me show you some of the other things.

And let's see if you can tie together, what I'm driving at.

Okay. There is a method to the madness on the things I'm going to show you.

These things I just saw last night.

This isn't like, yeah. Well, I saw this a month ago.

I've been saying.

These are things, that I spent 20 minutes, just scrolling, going, wow.

That one. That one.

Okay.

Let's so on let's start with cut 12, please.

GLENN: All the New Yorkers in New York City, please, pay attention to what I'm about to say.

I know this morning got a list from my controller, to tell us the tax annual assessments and values. This happens every January to February. I got mine. Just on a few of our properties, just a few of them, every single one of them are going up. Some of them are going up ten to 15 percent. All the way up to 60, 75 percent. You have no clue what this means to this industry.

Now have clue, what this means to every average New Yorker.

Everybody in New York City, is affected.

Because I have stores here, supermarkets. $12,000. $14,000. I have -- I have small three-family buildings, renting them. Going up $9,000. Increase on top of the 30 thousands that I'm paying.
.
GLENN: That's crazy. That's crazy. Okay.

So everybody is paying a lot more. That's weird.

Cut -- cut 13. This is one about the hotels in New York.

VOICE: Here is the hotel.

VOICE: This is one of the hotels as transformed into the shelter.

VOICE: We will walk in there. And see what kind of operation they're running inside.

VOICE: Really nice hotel.

VOICE: How is it going?

VOICE: Oh, yeah. We're just checking in on the hotel. There's a ton of people in here.

GLENN: Because it's a shelter.

VOICE: Oh.

VOICE: Migrants going in?

VOICE: Yeah. It's no longer --

VOICE: How many floors is this?

VOICE: Thirty floors.

GLENN: Thirty.

Is it full? Yeah.

VOICE: You guys aren't allowed to talk about it? Why do you think it's a big secret, Duke?

GLENN: I don't know. We just follow orders.

VOICE: They signed the contract with an outside source, saying they will pay them rent, in order for them to house the migrants. And the hotels love it because it is guaranteed money every single night. And that array of $200 per night at the hotel.

And with 1,331 rooms, that is $260,000 a day. $1.8 million a week. And $7.2 million a month.

GLENN: Okay. $7.2 million a month.

For one hotel.

One.

Hotel.

Who is -- who is writing that check again?

Isn't that kind of important?

Who is writing that check?

One month, 7.2 million dollars.

Oh, that makes me understand the -- the other guy, who is like, look at our assessment on our buildings.

Bada bing.

Up 75 percent tax.

Bada bing.

Okay. All right.

So can we just play the horse running town, just because I need -- oh, there he is.

Running down.
(music)

Now let me show you, can we take cut six, please.

Cut six.

VOICE: Some of those suburban areas.

Are having double-digit car thefts with be in a week.

Sometimes in a day. People are stealing tires at a record rate. There's no consequences, accountability, repercussions.

GLENN: Hmm. Hmm. And there's problems CNN said with homelessness. Cut seven please.

VOICE: The number of people experiencing homelessness in a single night. Went up 12 percent in a single night in 2023.

In part, because COVID programs preventing evictions and housing losses came to an end.

A quarter of those people were unhoused for the first time in their lives.

VOICE: How many people fell into homelessness during COVID.

VOICE: Before COVID, there were probably about 20 or 30,000 people. Now it's 46,000.

GLENN: Uh-huh. Uh-huh. Here is -- here, I think this is Curtis. Just standing on third avenue. Which when I lived in New York.

You can't -- you can't stand in the middle of the street.

Here he is on third Avenue.

VOICE: This is something you'll never see in the middle of the day. Third Avenue in New York City.

This is the future. When everybody leaves and heads to Florida.

They're on the way to Texas. Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina.

Look. So what do we have here?

Because they've all fled the city. And it will only be a city of criminals. Emotionally disturbed migrants. I am Nostradamus. I see what's coming in 2024. Vast sea of emptiness.

GLENN: Well, that's good. That's good.

So let's see, we have too many migrants coming in.

More migrants, the collection of migrants that have been added to our country in the last three and a half years. Equal the population.

Of 38 states in America.

Equal or above the population of 38 -- we only have 50 states. I just want you to know that.

We only have 50.

38 of them are now smaller, than the people we have let in.

That's into -- I mean, I mean -- that's interesting.

And then we have some really, really.

I mean, we have some real problems. And I'm glad that we're dealing. What are we focused on.

Go ahead.

VOICE: The whom who runs the bullying account, lives of TikTok. Was given a spot on the Oklahoma library board. The statewide board.

She is not from --

GLENN: Now, could I just stop for a second.

This is a man in a dress.

Who clearly has --

STU: You don't like him.

GLENN: I don't. I don't. I think it's a little. And you might want to shave just a little bit. And the low cut tress there is nice. But if we know maybe you would shave just -- anyway, this guy is having a serious conversation, about what's acceptable in the library. And people are just watching it and going, well, he's making a good point.

He's not -- how!

Play the damn horse, running down the --

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: How about this one?

Cut 17.
(music)
Just

VOICE: I've seen this question. My problem is, I'm too hot. I'm too successful in my career. I make too much money. I have too many amazing friends and family. Too many cute clothes. Do you know how hard it is, to choose an outfit each day?

People sliding into my DMs every day.

GLENN: Okay. Stop. It's a man with boobs. It's a woman with a beard. I don't -- I have -- I don't know.

STU: They never had to deal with problems like that. They're too hot. People slipping into your DMs. This person has to deal with that every day.

GLENN: Do you know how hard it is to pick out a set of clothes every day?

No. I have no idea. I wear the same clothes. I have been wearing them since the third grade.

What the hell is wrong with you?

I swear to you, I mean, this story makes more sense than any other story I've seen today.

Oh, wow. Look, a horse running down a highway in Philadelphia.

When that becomes, eh.

STU: That's the most sensible story we've talked about in this segment. Sometimes horses run county the highway.

GLENN: Now, I would just like to point out. And maybe I've been in a coma. So I don't remember it. Sometimes you won't remember a coma. And you're all being nice, and you're like, don't say anything to him. He's forgotten he's been this a coma for 400 years. And we were in -- I don't know. Some freezer.

I don't know how this happened. But maybe I've been in a coma. But from where I'm sitting, none of this is normal.

May we just all take a moment and go, none of this is normal!

This is not the way a civilization behaves.

Am I alone on this?

I don't --

STU: Apparently so.

GLENN: Apparently, I --

STU: Apparently so. By the way, the horse is okay.

GLENN: The horse is --

STU: Yeah. The horse is okay.

GLENN: That would be the thing. Out of this monologue. Somebody -- well, what happened to the horse?

STU: I was --

GLENN: It's those damn cars, and those SUVs. I don't know what they're doing there. They're killing the planet. Have you heard about the big umbrella that we want to put in space?

Don't put big umbrellas in space. Are you out of your minds?

Oh, man. I just -- if I was in a coma, I want the doctors to know, put me back into the coma, please.